"C" AUTHOR LISTING (JOHN CALVIN, WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM, STEPHEN CHARNOCK, and many other CLASSIC REFORMATION AUTHORS)

Rare Reformation, Classic Covenanter and Calvinistic/Puritan Books (by John Calvin, William Cunningham, the Covenanted General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, Richard Cameron, Stephen Charnock, Joseph Caryl, the Cameronian magazine, W.H. Carslaw, Andrew Clarkson, Charles Chiniquy, Daniel Cawdrey, Thomas Chalmers, Elisha Coles, John Cotton, Walter Chantry, David Calderwood, John Knox, the Westminster Divines, et al.) at Great Discounts!

In the history of the church's sanctification I don't believe there has been a more valuable extra-biblical resource and tool than the Puritan Hard Drive.

It holds some of the most priceless Reformed works of God-centered and Christ-glorifying truth that were ever penned.

Most students, ministers and scholars of the Bible would never personally acquire even half the literal number of books on the Puritan Hard Drive, much less the extreme caliber of its contents.

In God's providence modern day Christians have been chosen to be the recipients of both a theological and practical blessing. May we not squander it. 

- Matthew McMahon, Ph.D.  A Puritan's Mind


ANNOUNCING THE GRAND OPENING OF STILL WATERS REVIVAL BOOKS' NEW WEB SITE!


PLEASE JOIN US AT PuritanDownloads.com TO SEE ALL THE NEW 99 CENT DIGITAL DOWNLOADS (REFORMATION AND PURITAN BOOKS, PSALM SINGING MP3s, etc.), THE NEW SWRB PURITAN HARD DRIVE, AND MUCH MORE! The new Web site is state-of-the-art and contains Puritan Hard Drive videos, Puritan quote videos, free samples of Psalm singing (MP3s), a powerful search engine, new material (Puritan books, MP3s and videos) that you may follow through an RSS feed, and it is very easy to navigate. Click here now to take a look at SWRB's new Web site!


John Calvin resources begin at the sixth item below. John Calvin's 22 volume hardcover commentary set now over 82% off. For a limited time just $249.94 (US funds, about $US199.00). Save $US1,146.00! See "Calvin's Commentaries (22 volumes)" below.

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*** Get 60 CLASSIC SWRB (PURITAN, REFORMATION, COVENANTER, CALVINISM, etc.) CDs for FREE! ***

60 NEW SWRB CDs, 3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE with ADDITIONAL PREPUBLICATION DISCOUNTS (for a limited time only)!

"Your... CD's of Reformation and Puritan authors are a great boon to studies in the Reformed-Puritan experiential tradition. Receive our hearty thanks for your invaluable work in making so many rare gems accessible to thousands."

- Dr. Joel R. Beeke, President of Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary

"Still Waters Revival Books... have released an incredible array of... compact disks which contain over 2,000 titles of some of the best Reformation and Calvinistic books ever written. It is by far the best and widest collection of Reformed literature ever assembled" (The Five Points of Calvinism: Defined, Defended, and Documented, Second [Special 40th Anniversary] Edition, Updated and Expanded [p. 76, 2004, Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Company] by David N. Steele, Curtis C. Thomas, and S. Lance Quinn, Foreword by Roger Nicole, Afterword by John MacArthur, emphases added).

"I have been systematically working through reading the Puritan and Reformed CDs I purchased... I must say, there is nothing like them available anywhere. It is the most amazing collection of works I know of in one package to date... You have done an immeasurable service for the Kingdom of Christ in making these CDs available, and every pastor and theologian should own them without question (they would be foolhardy to pass them by)" (Dr. C. Matthew McMahon, A Puritan's Mind Ministries).

The most extensive classic Christian CD library ever (on 90 CDs)!
(The best of the Puritans, Covenanters, Reformers, Baptists, Presbyterians, et al.)

90 Christian CDs In Total, Containing The Best Of Classic and Contemporary Christian Books (PDFs), MP3s, and Videos on Puritanism, the Reformation, the Covenanters (Like Gillespie, Rutherford, Durham, Manton, Cameron, Renwick, Love, et al.), the Westminster Divines (Like Gouge, Twisse, Henderson, Caryl, Burgess, et al.), the Puritans (Like Watson, Owen, Flavel, Sibbes, Brooks, Charnock, Edwards, et al.), Baptists (Like Spurgeon, Pink, Bunyan, et al.), Presbyterians (Like Calvin, Knox, Triall, Boston, Miller, Dabney, Thornwell, et al.), Calvinism and the Calvinists (Like Hodge, Henry, the Erskines, Shedd, et al.), the Reformers (Like Wycliffe, Tyndale, Luther, Bullinger, Foxe, Bradford, Beza, Perkins, et al.), the 1599 Geneva Bible (retypeset and searchable), Classic Puritan and Reformation Commentaries, and Much, Much More!

LIMITED TIME ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME PREPUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY FOR HUGE SAVINGS (UP TO AN ADDITIONAL $200 OFF OUR 3 FOR 1 DISCOUNT OFFER!)

ADDITIONAL PREPUBLICATION DISCOUNTS ONLY GUARANTEED UNTIL THE END OF THE DAY September 13, 2010 -- so if you have any questions or would like to place an order please call us at 1-780-450-3730 (24 hours a day, leave a message if you get voice mail and we will return your call), email us at swrb@swrb.com, Fax 780-468-1096, or use our secure order form at https://www.shopalberta.com/SWRB/.

         Over 23 years in the making

         3 for 1 CD Super Sale

         90 CDs in total (Calvinism, Protestant, and Reformation Bookshelf CDs -- 30 CDs per set)

         60 CDs for FREE for a limited time (see details on our 3 for 1 CD Super Sale at the links below)

         Over 3000 classic Christian books, sermons, and articles (in PDF format)

         Over 1500 classic sermons, audio books, lectures, and debates on MP3 (audio)

         Over 60 Christian videos (.wmv)

         Well Over $1,000,000.00 worth of resources on all 90 CDs at just pennies per book, audio, or video file.

         You may never have to purchase another Christian book or MP3 again -- and why would you want to when you can get the classic resources on these CDs for less than .02 each using our 3 for 1 SUPER SALE and our best prepublication offers (details at the links below).

         These 90 CDs comprise a complete Puritan, Reformation, Covenanter, Presbyterian, Baptist, etc., rare book library that is just one click away -- and on sale with additional prepublication discounts for a limited time only.

         The smallest CD in these sets contains over 10,000 pages and the largest CD in these sets contains over 30,000 pages of classic, printed, Christian (Puritan) information -- and lots of audio and videos too!

         All 90 SWRB CDs work with all operating systems and computers, PC or MAC.

         The printed books are all in the common, popular, and easy-to-use PDF format which can be read using the free Adobe Acrobat Reader program available at abode.com

         All audio files are in MP3 format and video files are in .wmv (Windows Media Video) format

         For set purchases all 90 CDs come in a convenient, durable, padded, carrying case, which is heat, moisture, and tear resistant -- as well as space-saving at just 7 inches (wide) by 11.5 inches (height) by 2.5 inches (depth)

         These CDs now make these exceptional and extraordinary Puritan, Covenanter, Presbyterian, Calvinist, Protestant, Reformed, and Baptist works both accessible and affordable to everyone!

         Interest free deferred payment option available for as little as $25/month

"This collection of... CDs is a truly astounding accomplishment. There is nothing like this available to the ordinary Christian on the whole face of the earth. Now, for the first time ever, ordinary Christians can have direct and near effortless access to the very cream of Puritan and Reformed, as well as Covenanter, literature... What they used to say of the Puritan John Flavel's preaching, can be said of these CDs: they are 'hissing hot'! (Dr Jonathan D. Moore, Cambridge, Scholar of 16th and 17th century Calvinistic literature.).

Click on the links below for the contents of all 90 Classic SWRB CDs offered in our new 3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE, including money saving details on additional discounts through our time limited PREPUBLICATION OFFER -- save up to $200 more by purchasing these CDs before September 13, 2010 .

CLICK ON THE LINKS BELOW FOR FULL DETAILS ON HOW TO GET 60 SWRB CDs FOR FREE

30 CALVINISM BOOKSHELF CDs

30 PROTESTANT BOOKSHELF CDs

30 REFORMATION BOOKSHELF CDs

ADDITIONAL PREPUBLICATION DISCOUNTS ONLY GUARANTEED UNTIL THE END OF THE DAY September 13, 2010 -- so if you have any questions or would like to place an order please call us at 1-780-450-3730 (24 hours a day, leave a message if you get voice mail and we will return your call), email us at swrb@swrb.com, Fax 780-468-1096, or use our secure order form at https://www.shopalberta.com/SWRB/.

"Your... CD's of Reformation and Puritan authors are a great boon to studies in the Reformed-Puritan experiential tradition. Receive our hearty thanks for your invaluable work in making so many rare gems accessible to thousands." (Joel Beeke, President of Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary).

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"These Puritan resources are the greatest I've ever seen. These eyes have never seen anything greater than what you have produced except that old King James Bible" (Email from a Customer in Georgia, USA).


Some Additional Customer Comments on SWRB's CD sets (Reformation, Calvinism, Protestant, Puritan).

"This collection of… CDs is a truly astounding accomplishment. There is nothing like this available to the ordinary Christian on the whole face of the earth. Now, for the first time ever, ordinary Christians can have direct and near effortless access to the very cream of Puritan and Reformed, as well as Covenanter, literature... What they used to say of the Puritan John Flavel's preaching, can be said of these CDs: they are 'hissing hot'! ... more" (emphases added).

- Dr Jonathan D. Moore, Cambridge, UK.
(Scholar of 16th and 17th century Calvinistic literature.)


"The purchase of (SWRB's) CD's is proving to be one of the wisest investments that I have ever made. They are much more than I expected!! I am having a wonderful time reading and studying."

- TC, Internet Customer (USA).


"The greatest collection of classic Reformation resources on one CD set ever!"

"In reading this mornings mailing I noticed that you also do the Reformation Bookshelf CD's so I went to your web site to see what was out -- I was in ecstasy!!!"

- Missionary working in Hatyai, Southern Thailand


Full SWRB CD comment from Dr. McMahon:

"I have been systematically working through reading the Puritan and Reformed CDs I purchased.

I must say, there is nothing like them available anywhere.

It is the most amazing collection of works I know of in one package to date.

In my opinion, it far surpasses Ages Software and their collections.*

The Puritan and Reformed material presented on these CDs is exceptional.

I am continually amazed at the depth and breadth of information in both collections, and the rarity of works that I now have at my fingertips.

You have done an immeasurable service for the Kingdom of Christ in making these CDs available, and every pastor and theologian should own them without question (they would be foolhardy to pass them by)."

- For Christ's Crown and Covenant,
Dr. C. Matthew McMahon
A Puritan's Mind Ministries, www.apuritansmind.com
John 5:39, "...search the Scriptures..."
"Novum Testamentum in Vetre latet, et in Novo, Vetus patet." Augustine
( "The New is in the Old concealed, and in the New, the Old revealed." )

* It is SWRB's opinion that Ages has done an excellent job in making various Reformed works available on CD, so much so that we also distribute a number of their CDs at discounts. Thus, please don't make more out of our publishing this comment than is warranted, as this is a comment we received from one of our customers and it expresses his opinion. As for Ages' work, we rejoice whenever the truth is published, whether through others or through SWRB (as we play only a very small part in the revival of classic Reformation, Puritan and Covenanter thought that is now taking place worldwide through God's marvelous grace). The publication of the best Reformers and Puritans of the past is one of the greatest needs of our time, as this extends the blessings that come through faithful preachers and authors into our day and into the future. Lord willing, the growth in the publishing of faithful works from the past will help stem the tide of the great declension and unfaithfulness which we are now witnessing all around us, even (sadly) among many churches that still call themselves "Presbyterian" and/or "Reformed." So please pray together with us that our Lord will multiple the number of faithful publishers and publications, and that He will give many the heart to stand for the truth no matter the consequences (as He has done for our faithful forefathers, who resisted Satan and sin unto blood and even to martyrdom in many cases). -- RB.


"SWRB's Puritan and Reformation CD libraries are an invaluable source for the study of the history and theology of classic Reformation theology. The collection is remarkable not only for depth of content, but also for the rarity of many of the works. Most seminary libraries will not have even a percentage of the works available on these CD-ROMs. I cannot imagine anyone working in Reformation / historical theology that would not want to use the Puritan and Reformed libraries!"

- Phillip J. Long
Associate Prof. of New Testament
Grace Bible College
Grand Rapids, MI 49509


"I just received your CD collection. One bit of advice: you should instruct your customers to take about 1 week off just to peruse the tables of contents for these CD's, followed by another week off, in order to recover from the state of shock in which they will find themselves.

In all seriousness, this collection is almost impossible to describe. It has to be seen to be believed. As a pastor, my library has just increased dramatically. As a Ph.D. student in Puritan and Post-Reformation studies, I have immediate access to many of the same works for which I would normally need to access through rare book rooms of theological libraries.

Thank you for this labor of love. Thank you for making it accessible, both financially and technologically. May the Lord richly bless you for this service to his people."

- Yours for the faith,
Pastor David Owen Filson
Good Shepherd Presbyterian Church (PCA), Nashville, TN


"You all are doing a wonderful service by making all these materials so readily available. Having them on my hard drive is BETTER than having access to a rare book library with all of them in hand... I have found the CD set invaluable as a tool of scholarship. So once again I commend you brothers for making it available."

- Dr. E. Calvin Beisner
Knox Theological Seminary
Author and Associate Professor of Historical Theology and Social Ethics

(Author of: Psalms of Promise: Celebrating the Majesty and Faithfulness of God, God in Three Persons, Answers: For Atheists, Agnostics, and Other Thoughtful Skeptics--Dialogs About Christian Faith and Life, Man, Economy, and Environment in Biblical Perspective, Where Garden Meets Wilderness: Evangelical Entry Into the Environmental Debate, Evangelical Heathenism? Examining Contemporary Revivalism, as well as other books, scholarly papers, and contributions to various anthologies).


"It's been several weeks now since I received the CDs and have had some time to digest some of them. All I can say is, "WOW!" This is truly a library like no other, and has already paid great dividends not only in my own personal worship and study, but in my teaching as well. I first balked at the price, but after seeing the vastness of the material, I almost feel as though I'm robbing you!

I pray that the Lord will allow you to get these materials into the hands of as many ministers as possible."

- Email from SC, USA


Full SWRB CD comment from Dr. Moore:

This collection of 62 CDs is a truly astounding accomplishment. There is nothing like this available to the ordinary Christian on the whole face of the earth.

Now, for the first time ever, ordinary Christians can have direct and near effortless access to the very cream of Puritan and Reformed, as well as Covenanter, literature.

These books are often in fascinating first editions and many are electronically linked and indexed for the first time. The ordinary Christian may here dig into a simply staggering wealth of literature, from devotional and sermonic material to technical and scholarly works. Even in the days of the Long Reformation itself ordinary Christians didn't get to see this kind of library -- most couldn't read for a start, and even those who could, would never have been able to afford to buy even a hundredth part of the material on these CDs. Truly we are without excuse!

And the significance of this collection goes even beyond that. No longer do we have to wait for modern Reformed publishing houses to predict that a particular Reformation or Puritan book will be sufficiently popular to make it economical to reprint, or to deem it "safe" enough to be let loose on the modern evangelical church. Rather, we are now able to see for ourselves the whole range of the Puritan and Reformed publishing enterprise, including views that are usually suppressed by most modern devotees of "Puritan" piety!

Buy these CDs while you can, and find out for yourself what the First and Second Reformations were really all about! You'll be truly amazed, and, by God's grace, will grow from being an ordinary Christian to being an extraordinary one. What they used to say of the Puritan John Flavel's preaching, can be said of these CDs: they are "hissing hot"!

- Dr Jonathan D. Moore, Cambridge, UK.
(Scholar of 16th and 17th century Calvinistic literature.)


"This side of eternity I'll never be able to repay the favor you have done mankind by bringing these... CDs together.

The first week of reading I grew more as a Christian reading those rich, pure Gospel Commentators than I have in 18 years of Christian life. After reading some of the Puritan CDs I have to get the Reformation set if it kills me. A fire is burning within me. These... CDs are liable to start a revival fire unseen in any generation... the Gospel in its pure form is seen in these... CDs.

Sir, I cant say enough. What a treasure! I'll never be able to repay you this side of heaven, but when we get there I am sure you will see the rich fruits of your labor. God bless you for not being money hungry but wanting to see Christians grow in the Lord... I love you even though we have never met, you have helped me in my Christian walk tremendously with these... CDs.

I am not bragging on the flesh, I am just giving honor where honor is due. The Holy Ghost will take these CDs and light a fire unseen and unheard of. God bless you all at Still Waters."

- Email from the USA


"Thank you so very much for the CDs.

I am amazed at the quality and quantity of the literature...

I cannot imagine any other single thing being done by any man or group of men in the earth today that is of such extensive, present, and enduring value as this CD work is.

God be praised that he uses sickly and weak men to forward his kingdom, that the work may not be mistaken to be wrought by the might of men, but by his Spirit. His strength is perfected in weakness."

- Email from Colorado

______________

Many more comments on the SWRB's CD sets (by the Banner of Truth magazine, Calvin Beisner [Professor of Historical Theology and Social Ethics at Knox Theological Seminary], Dr. E.P. Elliott [Christian Observer magazine], and many others.) can be found at the end of the page at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm


 

HOW TO GET 60 FREE SWRB CDs (UNTIL THE END OF THE DAY April 27, 2010) BY THE BEST CLASSIC AND CONTEMPORARY PURITANS, REFORMERS, COVENANTERS, CALVINISTS, PRESBYTERIANS, REFORMED BAPTISTS, PROTESTANTS, et al. (CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW)

http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/60_FREE_PURITAN_CDs.htm

 


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CALAMY, EDMUND
A Practical Discourse Concerning Vows: With Special Reference to Baptism and the Lord's Supper (1697)

Everything you always wanted to know about vows (an important part of sanctification which is little heard of in our day). This book includes much general practical application (regarding vows), with abundant particular attention to vows as they relate to baptism and the Lord's supper. As it should be with all Christians, Calamy writes, "Whoever is conversant in David's Psalms, will find him frequently making vows, and careful in paying them."

Calamy was a prominent Westminster Divine, and Thomas Smith notes that "he was an active and zealous man in all their proceedings, and much distinguished, both for his learning and moderation, in assembly"(Select Memoirs... of English and Scottish Divines, p. 474). Smith further states, "Mr. Calamy was one of the most popular preachers in London, and frequently appointed to preach before the long parliament; for which the prelatical party have treated him with unmerited abuse" (idem.) He opposed Cromwell (as many faithful Puritans did) to his face, was ejected in 1662, and spent time in prison (due to popish/prelatical persecution) for his faithfulness to Christ. 318 pages.

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(Rare bound photocopy) $9.95 (US funds) [$70 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds) [$80 off!]

September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(Rare bound photocopy) $79.95 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $99.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 3 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALDERWOOD, DAVID
The Altar of Damascus or the Pattern of the English Hierarchy, and Church Policy Obtruded Upon the Church of Scotland (1621)

Considered by many to be one of the major classics of Reformation thought regarding worship and church government.

The "Altare," or Altar of Damascus (a title founded on 2 Kings 16: 10-11), is Calderwood's masterpiece, and contains an elaborate examination of the constitution and ceremonies of the Church of England (and thus Prelacy and the English Popish ceremonies which the most faithful Reformers have always condemned--RB). The original of the Latin work was a tract in English, published in 1621. It is said that King James, on reading this looked melancholy, and being asked the cause pointed to the formidable treatise. "Let not that trouble your majesty," said the courtier, "I shall soon answer it." "Answer what man"" replied the King, "there is nothing there but Scripture, reason, and the fathers" (Johnston, Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 284).

The "Altare Damascenum" is beyond comparison the most learned and elaborate work ever written on the subject, embracing the whole controversy between the English and Scottish divines as to government, discipline, and worship ( T. M'Mcrie as cited in Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 284).

This volume is the English "tract" (of 222 pages) referenced above.

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO AND INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(Rare bound photocopy) $9.95 (US funds) [$40 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds) [$50 off!]

September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(Rare bound photocopy) $49.95 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $69.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 3 and 11 at:
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALDERWOOD, DAVID

The History of the Kirk of Scotland

(8 volumes)

 

"The extensive learning and eminent talents of the Rev. David Calderwood, his matured experience in ecclesiastical affairs, and especially in those of his native country, the persecutions he had endured for his beloved Church, and the numerous works he had written in its defence, all qualified him, in the happiest manner, for becoming a Historian of the Kirk of Scotland. Above all, when the narrative was to be one of struggle and suffering, in which the principalities and powers of the earth, as well as those of darkness, were the antagonists, the record of such a conflict fell most aptly into the hands of a man whom a monarch had in vain attempted to brow-beat, and a whole hierarchy to silence. His own heart also appears to have affectionately inclined towards this his most congenial occupation, so that, after his return from exile, he spent many years in collecting and arranging the materials necessary for such an important task. At last, when he had reached his seventy-third year, the General Assembly, for the purpose of enabling him to perfect his work, granted him an annual pension of 800 pounds Scots. Calderwood died only two years afterwards; but he lived to accomplish his purpose of writing the History of our National Church from the commencement of the Reformation to the close of the reign of James the Sixth, in two, if not three successive and copious revisals" (Preface to volume one, pp. v-vi). More on the prominent role Calderwood played in the church of his day is supplied by Johnston, in his Treasury of the Scottish Covenant (p. 47), when he writes that "the Second Book of Discipline was sworn to in the National Covenant in 1581, and revised by the Assembly of 1638. The most important parts of the book were legalized in 1592, and again in 1690. Calderwood, the historian, edited "The First and Second Book of Discipline," printed in 1621." Furthermore, the Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology (p. 118) tells us that Calderwood was "excluded from the church courts when he opposed Bishop James Law of Orkney's (FES VII, 322) substitution of royal supporters in place of the Presbytery's duly elected representatives to the General Assembly. But when King James VI visited Scotland in 1617, Calderwood and 54 other ministers meeting in Edinburgh wrote a protest against the King's intention that the monarch and men of his preference should appoint forms of worship and discipline in the Church. Calderwood was required to appear with Archibald Simson before the King at St. Andrews, where from his knees he boldly opposed the King's will and asserted the freedom of the General Assembly to control the Church's ceremonies and government (emphasis added, and some today say these are points of little or no consequence -- how different from our Reformed forefathers--RB). Calderwood was deprived of his charge, imprisoned and banished. In 1619 he went to Holland, whence he issued anonymously his monumental critique of English episcopacy, The Altar of Damascus (n.p., 1621), greatly enlarged in Latin... Calderwood's writings were erudite and widely persuasive, preparing the way for the restoration of Presbyterian practice at the 'Second Reformation'... With Alexander Henderson and David Dickson he was appointed by the General Assembly of 1643 to draft a directory for public worship, to fill a need for guidelines after the episcopal conventions had been removed (in keeping with the Solemn League and Covenant--RB)." The same article, commenting on this eight volume history, relates, "it is a major source for the history of the Church of Scotland from the Reformation until 1625." This massive set (of over 6000 pages) was printed between 1842 and 1849. It contains a 171 page index and Thomson's "Life of David Calderwood." The contents are listed and dealt with chronologically by year; beginning in the preamble with the descent of the Scots from the ancient Gauls, but formally covering the period (focusing to the church) from 1514 to 1625. Documents and information available no where else (that we know of) are also included in this set. Must reading for researchers and those interested in church history!

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(8 volume rare bound photocopy set) $799.95-80%=$159.99 (US funds) [$135.99 off!]

(8 volume rare Hardcover photocopy set) $195.00 (US funds) [$200 off!]

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR DISCOUNTED PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(8 volume rare bound photocopy set) $799.95-63%=295.98 (US funds)

(8 volume rare Hardcover photocopy set) $395.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 11 at:
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALDERWOOD, DAVID

The Pastor and the Prelate or Reformation and Conformity Shortly Compared (First American edition of 1844).
This 17th century work refutes prelacy. Calderwood, bound by solemn oath to defend the doctrine and discipline of Biblical Presbyterian government and worship, and to oppose the hierarchy, along with all rites and ceremonies added to the worship of God, does a masterful job here. He uses the Word of God and the proceedings of the ancient and Reformation churches to make his points. He deals with controversies over things "indifferent," people's souls, state and society, etc. - as they are affected by these two systems of government. He points out the far reaching consequences of the implementation of various systems of church government and worship, showing how these specific ideas are eventually mirrored in the culture in general. Summarizing, he notes the classic saying concerning these matters and their consequences in the civil realm, "no ceremony no bishop, no bishop no king," and in the ecclesiastical arena, "no ceremony no prelate, no prelate no pope."
(Rare bound photocopy) $29.95-80%=$5.99 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 11 at:
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CALDERWOOD, DAVID

The True History of the Church of Scotland, From the Beginning of the Reformation, unto the end of the Reigne of King James VI (1678)
This is the officially sanctioned history of the Church of Scotland, written, as the title page notes, by "appointment of the General Assembly, by whom his laboures herein were several times revised and examined, and at length approved for the Press." The title continues: "Wherein, besides some touches of the Civil State and Alteration of Affaires, in their due order; there is not only a series of the Assemblies, and of the Principal of their Actings recorded; but also a full and plaine Relation of the Trials and Troubles, which the Church did meet with from Enemies to the purity of the Doctrine, Worship, Discipline and Government; of the several Alterations, caused or occasioned thereby; of the many sad and lamentable faintings and backslidings of Persons, sometimes eminent in the Church; of the faithful contendings of others for the Prerogatives of Christ, as the alone Head of the Church, for the purity of His Institutions, and for the Liberty and Privileges of His Church and Kingdom, against all the Enemies thereof; and particularly against Erastianisme and Prelacy, the two grand Enemies of the Discipline and Government of the Church of Christ, and of their sad sufferings upon the account thereof." 845 pages.
(Bound photocopy) $99.95-75%=$24.99 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $35.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 1 and 11 at:
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


Books On JOHN CALVIN:


BEZA, THEODORE

The Life of John Calvin

Beza was Calvin's friend, student and successor at Geneva. As an eye-witness to Calvin's conduct and an intimate friend, this work (of 100 pages), of necessity, retains a special quality that other treatments of Calvin's life will lack. Notwithstanding, the best modern treatment of Calvin's views and work is found in Carlos Eire's War Against the Idols: The Reformation of Worship from Erasmus to Calvin ($US39.96).

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(Rare bound photocopy) $3.98 (US funds) [$6 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy) $9.00 (US funds) [$15 off!]

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR DISCOUNTED PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(Rare bound photocopy) $9.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $24.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 19 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm

Works by John Calvin at also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 5 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm


THE HUMANNESS OF JOHN CALVIN

by Richard Stauffer 

 

"This little book is one of a kind. Written by a careful historian and Swiss pastor, it draws on Calvin's correspondence and other records of the time to give a strong impression of what the reformer was like as a person, in his family life, in his close friendships, and in his sympathy and generosity as a pastor."

 

- Sherman Isbell

 

.

"I shall never forget the impact of this small work on my own estimation of Calvin: it completely re-oriented my perspective on the French Reformer…. Read on, prepare to be challenged and rejoice that God raises up such historians for the blessing of the Church."

 

- Dr. Michael Haykin

 

"In the early years of my first pastorate I read the excellent biographies of Calvin by T. H. L. Parker, and Emanuel Stickelberger. At the same time I acquired Calvin's letters and the splendid little study which you now hold in your hands. Already convinced of the humanness of Calvin I considered Richard Stauffer's study to be unique in demonstrating this dimension of the great theologian. Beyond its value as an historical polemic, it provides a marvelous example to all who would be faithful pastors and theologians. The best response to detractors is the Christ-like example which Calvin left us."

- Gregory Reynolds

(Softcover) $13.00 (US funds)

Works by John Calvin at also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 5 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm


JOHN CALVIN, MARTIN LUTHER, JOHN KNOX, JOHN OWEN, CHARLES SPURGEON, ARTHUR PINK, et al.
Ultimate Christian Library (DVD)

This is the first collection of Christian writings to be available on DVD. Over 3 gigabytes of information are packed onto 1 disc containing the entire libraries of:

The Master Christian Library Version 8
The Reformation History Library Version 2
The C.H. Spurgeon Collection
The Complete John Calvin Collection
The Arthur Pink Collection
The John Owen Collection
The John Gill Collection

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO AND INCLUDING December 7, 2010
(DVD) $499.95 (US funds) [$100 off!]

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(DVD) $599.95 (US funds)


John Calvin wrote:

"If it be asked, then, by what things chiefly the Christian religion has a standing amongst us, and maintains its truth, it will be found that the following two not only occupy the principal place, but comprehend under them all the other parts, and consequently the whole substance of Christianity, viz., a knowledge first, of the right way to worship God; and secondly of the source from which salvation is to be sought. When these are kept out of view, though we may glory in the name of Christians, our profession is empty and vain." (Calvin cited in Carlos Eire's War Against the Idols, p. 198, from John Calvin's On the Necessity of Reforming the Church [FREE at: http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/NRC_ch00.htm], emphases added).


CALVIN, JOHN
The John Calvin Collection on CD-ROM

A great collection from John Calvin (and others) on one affordable CD-ROM. Now for a fraction of the price of hardcover volumes, you can have easy access to Calvin's commentaries, sermons, letters, treatises, and tracts. Also included is the new Battles translation of Calvin's Institutes (as well as the older Beveridge edition), Beza's biography of the great Reformer and much bonus data (including digital library Bibles, the complete works of Augustine, and Strong's Greek Dictionary). Requires 8MB of RAM and Windows 3.1 or higher. Here is what you get:

Commentaries (22 Volume Set)
Institutes (both the Battles and Beveridge editions)
Selected Works (tracts, treatises, letters, etc., 7 volumes)
Treatise on Relics
The Secret Providence of God
Sermons on Galatians
Sermons on Psalm 119
Sermons on the Deity of Christ
Sermons on Election and Reprobation (Genesis)
Commentary on Seneca's Of Clemency
History of the Reformation in the Time of Calvin (8 volumes -- by J.H. Merle d'Aubigne)
Calvin and His Enemies -- by Thomas Smyth
The Life of Calvin -- by Theodore Beza
Bibles
Strong's Greek Dictionary
The Works of Augustine

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO AND INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(CD-ROM) $79.95 (US funds) [$20 off!]

September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(CD-ROM) $99.95 (US funds)

FREE MP3s: Institutes of the Christian Religion #12 (Free Will Refuted & How God Works in the Hearts of Men Regarding Salvation, Sanctification & Reprobation) by John Calvin

FREE MP3 at http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=121506153210


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3 for 1 REFORMATION, PURITAN, COVENANTER, PROTESTANT CD SUPER SALE ENDS SOON (at the end of the day on this coming Monday, September 13, 2010 (click on the links below for details)!

Links to all 90 SWRB CDs related to the 3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE OFFER above.

30 CALVINISM BOOKSHELF CDs

30 PROTESTANT BOOKSHELF CDs

30 REFORMATION BOOKSHELF CDs

"This collection of… CDs is a truly astounding accomplishment. There is nothing like this available to the ordinary Christian on the whole face of the earth. Now, for the first time ever, ordinary Christians can have direct and near effortless access to the very cream of Puritan and Reformed, as well as Covenanter, literature... What they used to say of the Puritan John Flavel's preaching, can be said of these CDs: they are 'hissing hot'! ... more" (emphases added).

- Dr Jonathan D. Moore, Cambridge, UK.
(Scholar of 16th and 17th century Calvinistic literature.)


CALVIN, KNOX, LUTHER, et al.
Reformation History Library, Version 2 on CD-ROM

Did you ever wonder what the Reformation was really about? Are you aware of the sacrifices that many men and women made in the 16th century in their stand for the truth of Scripture and the Lordship of the Lord Jesus Christ? Why were these sacrifices made? What drove these believers to sacrifice their belongings, homes and eventually their lives, all in the name of the Reformed faith and unswerving faithfulness to the Lord Jesus Christ? Many brave men and women where tortured and died at the hands of the Roman Catholic Antichrist during the Reformation and this CD will give you a look at the truths that these brave martyrs (witnesses) stood for -- even to the shedding of blood in resisting sin. We need to understand the sacrifices that these noble witnesses for Christ made, as we reap the fruit of their faithfulness today, lest they and the teaching they maintained be forgotten and history repeats itself once again. Thus, we are excited to announce the release of the Reformation History Library Version 2 (less a few of the selections included). The Reformation History Library is the most exhaustive collection of books written about this critical time in the history of the world. The Reformation History Library will provide the reader with new insight and information that is not available on any other CD package. There are over 50 books and 650+ graphic illustrations that depict the history of the Reformation era on this CD. If you are interested in the finest collection of Reformation history information available on one CD, now is the time to pick up this great resource at our discounted price (adapted/Ages). Here is an overview of what is contained on this CD:

Index to Contents of RHL:

CATEGORIES

Bibles
References
Reformation Church History
The Ante-Nicene Fathers
The John Foxe Collection
The Martin Luther Collection
Collected Writings
Theology - Issues
Illustration Collection

Bibles

King James - New Testament / Old Testament
American Standard - New Testament / Old Testament

References

Wetzel, R. C. - Chronology of Biblical Christianity
Calvin, John - Institutes of the Christian Religion (Vols. 1-4)
Whiston, W. - The Life and Writings of Flavius Josephus

Reformation Church History

Allix, Peter - The Ecclesiastical History of the Ancient Churches of the Piedmont and the Albigenses
Arnaud, Henri - The Glorious Recovery by the Vaudois of their Valleys
Benedict, David - The History of the Baptists (2 Vols.)
Bliss, S. - Sacred Chronology
d'Aubigne, J. H. Merle - History of the Reformation in the Time of Calvin (Vols. 1-8), History of the 16th Century Reformation, The Protector
Geddes - History of the Church of Ethiopia
Faber, George - The History of the Ancient Vallenses and Albigenses
Hagstotz, Gideon & Hilda - Heroes of the Reformation
Hefele, C. - History of the Council of the Church (Vols. 1-5)
Heylyn, Peter - Ecclesia Restaurata (2 Vols.)
Jones, William - History of the Christian Church (2 Vols.)
Knox, John - The Reformation in Scotland
M'Crie, Thomas - The Life of John Knox, The Reformation in Spain
Miller, Andrew - Miller's Church History
Perrin, Jean Paul - History of the Ancient Christians
Poggius The Papist - Hus the Heretic
Smiles, Samuel - Huguenots in England and Ireland
Strype, John - Annals of the Reformation (Vols. 1-7)
Thomson, John Henderson - Cloud of Witnesses
Wilkinson, Benjamin George - Truth Triumphant
Wylie, J.A. - History of Protestantism (Vols. 1-3), History of the Scottish Nation

The Ante-Nicene Fathers

Volume 1 - The Apostolic Fathers (Clement, Mathetes, Polycarp, Ignatius, Barnabas, Papias, Justin Martyr)
Volume 2 - Fathers of the Second Century (Hermas, Tatian, Theophilus, Athenagoras, Clement of Alexandria)
Volume 3 - Latin Christianity; Its Founder Tertullian (I. Apologetic, II. Anti-Marcion, III. Ethical)
Volume 4 - Fathers of the Third Century (Tertullian, Minucius Felix, Commodianus, Origen)
Volume 5 - Fathers of the Third Century (Hippolytus, Cyprian, Caius, Novatian, with Appendices)
Volume 6 - Fathers of the Third Century (Gregory Thaumaturgus, Dionysius the Great, Julius Africanus, et al
.)
Volume 7 - Fathers of the Third and Fourth Centuries (Lactantius, Dionysius of Rome, Teaching of the Apostles, Early Liturgies)
Volume 8 - Fathers of the Third and Fourth Centuries (Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, Apocrypha of the New Testament, etc)
[Volume 9 - Index to the printed edition; now part of search feature]
Volume 10 - Original Supplement to the American Edition

The John Foxe Collection

Foxe, John - Acts and Monuments
Volume 1 - Life of Foxe, & The Church, 64AD - 449AD
Volume 2 - Acts and Monuments, 450AD - 1376AD
Volume 3 - Acts and Monuments, 1377AD - 1483AD
Volume 4 - Acts and Monuments, 1485AD - 1532AD
Volume 5 - Acts and Monuments, 1533AD - 1548AD
Volume 6 - Acts and Monuments, 1549AD - 1555AD
Volume 7 - Acts and Monuments, 1555AD cont.
Volume 8 - Acts and Monuments, 1556AD - 1581AD

The Martin Luther Collection

95 Theses
The Life and Times of Martin Luther
A Commentary on St. Paul's Epistle to the Galatians
Luther's Commentary on the Sermon on the Mount
The Letters of Martin Luther
Watchwords for the Warfare of Life from Dr. Martin Luther
Propechies of Luther
Sermons of Martin Luther - (Vols. 1-8)
Works of Martin Luther - (Vols. 1-6)

Collected Writings

Bradford, John - The Writings of John Bradford, M.A.
Coverdale, Bishop - Writings and Translations
Fox, John - Writings of John Fox, Bale, and Coverdale.
Jones, Alonzo - Lessons From The Reformation - Ecclesiastical Empire
The Great Empires of Prophecy - The Two Republics
Knox, John - Select Practical Writings.
Latimer, Hugh - Sermons and Remains
St. Patrick. The Apostle of Ireland - Selected Writings
Tyndale, William - Doctrinal Treaties and Introductions to Different Portions of The Holy Scriptures

Theology - Issues

Anderson, Christopher - Annals of the English Bible
Andrews, J.N. - History of the Sabbath
Cassels, Samuel J. - Christ and Anti-Christ
Edwardson, Christian - Facts of Faith
Guiness, H. Grattan - Romanism and the Reformation
Heylyn, Peter - History of the Sabbath
Hoare, H. W. - Evolution of the English Bible
Howell, Robert B. C. - Evils of Infant Baptism (this item is an anti-scriptural inclusion--SWRB)
Newton, Sir Isaac - Observations of the Prophecies of Daniel and the Apocalypse of St. John
Smith, Uriah - Daniel and the Revelation
Standish, Russell R. - Modern Bible Translations
Taylor, D. T. - The Voice of the Church
Waggoner, E. J. - Christ and His Righteousness
White, Dr. Fr. - Treatise of The Sabbath Day
Wilkinson, Benjamin - Our Authorized Bible Vindicated

Reformation Illustration Collection

The Henri Arnaud Gallery - (Vols 1-2)
The John Foxe Gallery - Volume 1
The John Knox Gallery - Volume 1
The John Thomson Gallery - Volume 1
The J. A. Wylie Gallery - Volumes 1A,1B,1C, 2A, 2B, 3A ,3B

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO AND INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(CD-ROM) $129.95 (US funds) [$50 off!]

September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(CD-ROM) $179.95 (US funds)

FREE MP3s: Institutes of the Christian Religion #12 (Free Will Refuted & How God Works in the Hearts of Men Regarding Salvation, Sanctification & Reprobation) by John Calvin

http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=121506153210


 

RELATED CD RESOURCES:
Get 60 CDs for FREE!

3 for 1 REFORMATION, PURITAN, COVENANTER, PROTESTANT CD SUPER SALE ENDS SOON (at the end of the day on this coming Monday, September 13, 2010 (click on the links below for details)!

Links to all 90 SWRB CDs related to the 3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE OFFER above.

30 CALVINISM BOOKSHELF CDs

30 PROTESTANT BOOKSHELF CDs

30 REFORMATION BOOKSHELF CDs

"This collection of… CDs is a truly astounding accomplishment. There is nothing like this available to the ordinary Christian on the whole face of the earth. Now, for the first time ever, ordinary Christians can have direct and near effortless access to the very cream of Puritan and Reformed, as well as Covenanter, literature... What they used to say of the Puritan John Flavel's preaching, can be said of these CDs: they are 'hissing hot'! ... more" (emphases added).

- Dr Jonathan D. Moore, Cambridge, UK.
(Scholar of 16th and 17th century Calvinistic literature.)


CALVIN, JOHN
Sermons on the Beatitudes

Among the many activities which claimed Calvin‚s attention during his long ministry in Geneva (1536-1538; 1541-1564), preaching was the most public and perhaps the most influential. Public because, for many years, twice on Sundays and daily in alternate weeks, the Reformer stood before a congregation of townsfolk, refugees and visitors to teach, warn, appeal, counsel, admonish, and encourage. Influential because, vital as the Institutes, commentaries and treatises were to the defense and propagation of Christian doctrine, it was the Word preached and applied from the pulpit which above all fashioned Geneva‚s evangelical culture and made it the nerve-centre of Reformed Protestantism. This volume presents readers with a short series of sermons on the Beatitudes, translated for the first time into English by Robert White. They comprise Calvin‚s exposition of Matthew 5:1-12, Mark 3:13-19 and Luke 6:12-26. Five sermons were preached on the Beatitudes in the course of an extended treatment of the Synoptic Gospels. Begun in July 1559, this series had still not been completed by February 1564, when ill health forced the Reformer‚s retirement from the pulpit. His absence was to be permanent: he died three months later, in May 1564. The late date of these sermons, therefore, marks them out as a definitive example of the Reformer‚s mature pulpit style. They represent his very last effort to elucidate a New Testament text in the context of regular public worship. Translated into a modern idiom, this book will transport the reader back into sixteenth-century Geneva, where he can hear the Reformer preach on issues of perennial Christian concern.

ABOUT THE TRANSLATOR Until recently Robert White taught in the Department of French Studies, University of Sydney, Australia, and has a specialist interest in the Reformation in French-speaking areas of Europe.

128 pages.

(Softcover) $14.00 (US funds)

CALVIN, JOHN
An Exhortation to Suffer Persecution and to Flee Outward Idolatry (1553)

Contains the following two facsimile sermons by one of the greatest preachers ever:

1. A Sermon Wherein All Christians Are Admonished to Flee Outward Idolatry.
2. An Exhortation to Suffer Persecution.

"Robert Horne (a Protestant, exiled during the reign of Mary) added an exceedingly interesting and valuable 'Apology' which is printed with these sermons" (EE). 118 pages, black letter.

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(Rare bound photocopy) $4.95 (US funds) [$25 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds) [$30 off!]

September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(Rare bound photocopy) $29.95 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $49.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 19 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALVIN, JOHN
Devotions and Prayers of John Calvin

52 one-page devotions with selected prayers on facing pages.120 pages, indexed.

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(Rare bound photocopy) $5.98 (US funds) [$9 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy) $14.00 (US funds) [$15 off!]

September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR DISCOUNTED PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(Rare bound photocopy) $14.95 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $29.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 21 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALVIN, JOHN

Acts of the Council of Trent: With the Antidote
Scottish theologian William Cunningham once noted that, "Calvin is the man who, next to St. Paul, has done most good to mankind." (cited in Christian History magazine, Vol. 5, No. 4). Here we have one example why, in Calvin's willingness to stand against false religion. This is a one-of-a-kind Reformation refutation of this wretched Roman standard. Trent is still upheld today and remains binding according to Rome - even after Vatican II and the signing of the anti-Christ Colson/Neuhaus document Evangelicals and Catholics Together. Thus, this Antidote remains pertinent, citing fully each section of Trent that Calvin is attacking. The major points dealt with include the rule of faith, original sin, justification and the sacrifice and merits of Christ. In regard to all of these points, it is clearly shown that the heresies of the Papists are numerous and deadly. Written near the end of Calvin's life, we have here a clear demonstration of Calvin's mature thought, countering Rome, and reiterating some of the most important principles of Reformation thought.
(Rare bound photocopy) $29.95-60%=$11.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $24.00 (US funds)

An older copy of this book is available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 21 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

A more modern (type style) copy of this book is available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 16 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


FREE WILL IS FROM

THE PAPAL ANTICHRIST

But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God (John 1:12-13).

 

FIRST TIME ENGLISH TRANSLATION!

 

CALVIN, JOHN

The Bondage & Liberation of the Will: A Defense of the Orthodox Doctrine of Human Choice Against Pighius (1543, 1996)

 

"In the belief that the 1539 edition of Calvin's Institutes, and in particular its chapters on free choice and predestination, constituted a greater danger than did the other 'Lutheran' writings, the Dutch Roman Catholic theologian Albert Pighius wrote a response entitled Ten Books on Human Free Choice and Divine Grace (1542). Calvin, when he saw Pighius's work, felt a pressing need to respond to Pighius's first six books, that is, those on free choice. The result was The Bondage and Liberation of the Will (1543). The Bondage and Liberation of the Will is undoubtedly the most significant of Calvin's works hitherto not translated in English. This is in striking contrast to Luther's study on the same topic, which is one of his best-known publications." This is Calvin's "fullest treatment of the relation between grace and free will, and contains important material not found elsewhere in his writings. It also contains far more discussion of the early church fathers than does any other of Calvin's works, apart from the Institutes. It is high time that this major work is made available to those whose knowledge of Calvin is confined to English translations" (back cover). 303 pages.

 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(Softcover) $29.95 (US funds) [$10 off!]

 

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CALVIN, JOHN

Calvin's Calvinism

Contains two treatises by Calvin:

1. The Eternal Predestination of God; and

2. The Secret Providence of God.

Translated by Henry Cole, this edition contains an index of Scripture passages cited.

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010
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September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES
(Rare bound photocopy) $24.95 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $39.00 (US funds)

+ This book is also available on all 30 Reformation Bookshelf CDs (in the "FREE BOOKS" file) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm (along with 100 other free books and articles!).

The Secret Providence of God by Calvin in now free on seven MP3s beginning at
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=84059934


NEW LOW PRICE!!!

Just $149.95 (US funds) which is $US1,246.00 off retail (up to and including September 13, 2010)!

CALVIN, JOHN

Calvin's Commentaries (22 volumes)
Considered by many to be the best set of commentaries on Scripture ever produced! Calvin's Commentaries cover the O.T. (except for Judges through Job and Proverbs through Song of Solomon) and the N.T. (except 2 and 3 John and Revelation).

The preface to the Kregal edition of Spurgeon's Commenting and Commentaries (1988) also notes,

I would not be possible for me too earnestly to press upon you the importance of reading the expositions of that prince among men, JOHN CALVIN! I am afraid that scant purses may keep you from their purchase, but if it be possible, procure them. I have often felt inclined to cry out with Father Simon, a Roman Catholic: "Calvin possessed a sublime genius," and with Scaliger, "Oh! how well Calvin has reached the meaning of the prophets - no one better." You will find 42 or more goodly volumes worth their weight in gold. Of all commentaries I believe John Calvin to be the most candid. In his expositions he is not always what some would call Calvinistic. That is to say, where Scripture maintains the doctrine of predestination and grace he flinches in no degree, but inasmuch as some Scriptures bear the impress of human free action and responsibility, he does not shun to expound their meaning in all fairness and integrity. He was no trimmer and pruner of texts. He gave their meaning as far as he knew it. His honest intention was to translate the Hebrew and the Greek originals as accurately as he possibly could, and then to give the meaning which would naturally be conveyed by such Greek and Hebrew words. He labored, in fact, to declare, not his own mind upon the Spirit's words, but the mind of the Spirit as couched in those words. Dr. King very truly says of him:

No writer ever dealt more fairly and honestly by the Word of God. He is scrupulously careful to let it speak for itself, and to guard against every tendency of his own mind to put upon it a questionable meaning for the sake of establishing some doctrine which he feels to be important, or some theory which he is anxious to uphold. This is one of his prime excellences. He will not maintain any doctrine, however orthodox and essential, by a text of Scripture, which to him appears of doubtful application, or of inadequate force. For instance, firmly as he believed the doctrine of the Trinity, he refuses to derive an argument in its favor from the plural form of the name of God in the first chapter of Genesis. It were easy to multiply examples of this kind, which, whether we agree in his conclusion or not, cannot fail to produce the conviction that he is at least an honest commentator, and will not make any passage of Scripture speak more or less than, according to his view, its divine Author intended to speak.

The edition of John Calvin's works which was issued by the Calvin Translation Society, is greatly enriched by the remarks of the editors, consisting not merely of notes on the Latin of Calvin, and the French translation, or on the text of the original Scriptures, but also of weighty opinions of eminent critics, illustrative manners and customs, and observations of travelers. By the way, gentlemen, what a pity it is that people do not, as a rule, read the notes in the old Puritan books! If you purchase old copies of such writers as Brooks, you will find that the notes in the margin are almost as rich as the books themselves. They are dust of gold, of the same metal as the ingots in the center of the page. But to return to Calvin. If you needed any confirmatory evidence as to the value of his writings, I might summon a cloud of witnesses, but it will suffice to quote one or two. Here is the opinion of one who is looked upon as his great enemy, namely, Arminius: "Next to the perusal of the Scriptures, which I earnestly inculcate, I exhort my pupils to peruse Calvin's Commentaries, which I extol in loftier terms than Helmich (a Dutch Protestant divine, A.D. 1551-1608) himself; for I affirm that he excels beyond comparison in the interpretation of Scripture, and that his commentaries ought to be more highly valued than all that is handed down to us by the Library of the Fathers; so that I acknowledge him to have possessed above most others, or rather above all other men, what may be called an eminent gift of prophecy."

Quaint Robert Robinson said of him, "There is no abridging this sententious commentator, and the more I read him, the more does he become a favorite expositor with me." Richard Baxter wrote, "I know no man since the apostles' days, whom I value and honor more than Calvin, and whose judgment in all things, one with another, I more esteem and come nearer to."

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010
(Hardcover, 22 volumes) $149.95 (US funds) [$1,246.00 off!]

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(Hardcover, 22 volumes) $1395.95 (US funds)

"After the reading of Scripture, which I strenuously inculcate, and more than any other ... I recommend that the Commentaries of Calvin be read ... For I affirm that in the interpretation of the Scriptures Calvin is incomparable, and that his Commentaries are more to be valued than anything that is handed down to us in the writings of the Fathers -- so much that I concede to him a certain spirit of prophecy in which he stands distinguished above others, above most, indeed, above all" -Jacobus Arminius (1560-1609)


CALVIN, JOHN

Calvin on the Free Offer of the Gospel
These words may shock many, but they are the words of John Calvin and they clearly show that Calvin believed in and taught what has come to be known as the free offer of the gospel. For example, Calvin writes, "So wonderful is his love towards mankind, that he would have them all to be saved..." (Calvin's Commentary
on 2 Peter 3:9). Appended is the article: "Faith's Encouragement; or, the Gospel Hearer's Right to and Interest in Christ Before Believing, A Great Encouragement, and the Only Encouragement to Believe" by "D." (1863). Excerpted from the Original Covenanter and Contending Witness magazine (volumes 2:11; 3:22; 4:3).
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CALVIN, JOHN

Calvin's Ecclesiastical Advice
46 letters and writings of Calvin newly translated into English
from Corpus Reformatorum (volume 38, part I). Focusing on doctrine, the Reformation, worship, discipline, judicial questions, and marriage, this books clearly exhibits Calvin's pastoral style. It also shows the great influence which Calvin exerted over second Reformation thought, because of his focus on doctrine, worship and church government.
(Softcover) $39.95


CALVIN, JOHN
Calvin's Selected Works (7 Volumes)

These remarkable volumes contain Calvin's tracts and letters. They clearly exhibit why Calvin was one of the great saints (who defended the regulative principle of worship) and why his work was singularly blessed of God.

Understanding these works will shed much light on our current situation; for many in the professed Christian community live in as great (or greater) darkness today than those who were contemporaries of Calvin.

This set contains such classics as "The Necessity of Reforming the Church," "The Catechism of the Church of Geneva," "An Antidote Against Trent," "The Sinfulness of Outward Conformity to Romish Rites" and much more (see the full contents below).

Calvin's only letter to Luther, his letters to Knox, Bullinger, Beza and a host of other Reformers, along with Beza's 100 page Life of Calvin are also all included.

Indexed, 3507 pages.

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This book is also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 5 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm

+ CONTENTS OF VOLUME FIRST -- Calvin's Selected Works

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

1.     LIFE OF JOHN CALVIN, BY THEODORE BEZA.

2.     LETTER BY JAMES SADOLET, A ROMAN CARDINAL, TO THE SENATE AND

3.     PEOPLE OF GENEVA.

4.     REPLY BY JOHN CALVIN TO LETTER BY CARDINAL SADOLET TO THE SENATE

5.     AND PEOPLE OF GENEVA.

6.     ARTICLES AGREED UPON BY THE FACULTY OF SACRED THEOLOGY OF

7.     PARIS, WITH THE ANTIDOTE

8.     THE NECESSITY OF REFORMING THE CHURCH

9.     A PATERNAL ADMONITION BY THE ROMAN PONTIFF, PAUL III, TO THE MOST

10.   INVINCIBLE EMPEROR, CHARLES V.

11.   REMARKS ON THE LETTER OF POPE PAUL III.

12.   AN ADMONITION, SHOWING THE ADVANTAGES WHICH CHRISTENDOM

13.   MIGHT DERIVE FROM AN INVENTORY OF RELICS

+ CONTENTS OF VOLUME SECOND -- Calvin's Selected Works

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE

I.               CATECHISM OF THE CHURCH OR GENEVA

II.              FORMS OF PRAYER

III.            FORM OF ADMINISTERING THE SACRAMENTS

IV.            VISITATION OF THE SICK

V.             BRIEF CONFESSION OF FAITH

VI.            CONFESSION OF FAITH OF THE REFORMED CHURCHES OF FRANCE

VII.          SHORT TREATISE ON THE LORD'S SUPPER

VIII.         MUTUAL CONSENT AS TO THE SACRAMENTS

IX.            SECOND DEFENCE OF THE SACRAMENTS

X.             LAST ADMONITION TO JOACHIM WESTPHAL

XI.            TRUE PARTAKING OF THE FLESH AND BLOOD OF CHRIST

XII.          BEST METHOD OF CONCORD ON THE SACRAMENTS

+ CONTENTS OF VOLUME THIRD -- Calvin's Selected Works

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

1. CANONS AND DECREES OF THE COUNCIL OF TRENT, WITH THE ANTIDOTE, 1547

2. ADULTERO-GERMAN INTERIM, WITH CALVIN'S REFUTATION, 1547, AND THE TRUE METHOD OF REFORMING THE CHURCH AND HEALING HER DIVISIONS 1547.

3. THE SINFULNESS OR OUTWARD CONFORMITY TO ROMISH RITES, 1587

4. PSYCHOPANNYCHIA; OR, THE SOULS IMAGINARY SLEEP BETWEEN DEATH AND JUDGMENT 1584

+ CONTENTS OF VOLUME FOURTH -- Calvin's Selected Works

1528

LETTER 1 -- TO NICHOLAS DUCHEMIN. -- Calvin at the University of Orleans -- his early friendships -- he is recalled to Noyon by the illness of his father.

1529

LETTER 2 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Calvin in Paris -- Nicholas Cop -- the two friends visit a monastery.

LETTER 3 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Thanks to Francis Daniel -- salutations to Melchior Wolmar -- various messages.

1530

LETTER 4 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Domestic intelligence -- departure to Italy of the brother of Francis Daniel.

1532

LETTER 5 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Calvin's first work -- Commentary on Seneca's Treatise, "De Clementia."

LETTER 6 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Calvin despatches copies of the Treatise, "De Clementia," to several persons -- looks for lodgings in Paris.

LETTER 7 -- TO DR. MARTIN BUCER. -- Recommendation of a French refugee in Strasbourg, who had been falsely accused of holding the doctrines of the Anabaptists.

1533

LETTER 8 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Various communications -- a new work put forth, LETTER 9 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- The Reformation in Paris -- rage of the Sorbonne-satirical Comedy directed against the Queen of Navarre -- intervention of Francis I. -- deliberation of the Four Faculties -- revocation of the censure pronounced against the book entitled "The Mirror of the Sinful Soul."

1534

LETTER 10 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Retirement of Calvin to Angouleme.

LETTER 11 TO CHRISTOPHER LIBERTET. -- Calvin in Basle -- revision of the Bible of Robert Olivetan -- treatise on the Immortality of the Soul.

1536

LETTER 12 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Calvin in Geneva -- translation into French of the "Christian Institutes" -- disputation of Lausanne -- establishment of the doctrines of the Reformation in the Pays de Vaud.

1537

LETTER 13 -- TO MEGANDER. -- Calvin and Caroli encounter each other -- prayers for the dead -- the Genevese clergy accused of Arianism -- need of a synod.

LETTER 14 -- TO VIRET. -- Preaching of the Gospel at Besancon -- ecclesiastical intelligence -- discouragement of Farel -- necessity for the return of Viret to Geneva.

LETTER 15 -- TO SIMON GRYNEE. -- The nature of the controversy between Calvin and Caroli clearly laid open -- Synod of Lausanne -- Caroli is condemned, and the teaching of Calvin and Farel solemnly approved,

LETTER 16 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF THE CHURCH AT BASLE. -- Persecution in France -- request addressed to the Seigneury of Basle in favor of the faithful of the Church at Nismes.

1538

LETTER 17 -- TO LOUIS DU TILLET. -- Departure of Louis du Tillet from Geneva -- regret of Calvin -- controversy between the two friends regarding the character of the Church of Jesus Christ.

LETTER 18 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER. -- State of the Church at Geneva -- wish for the union of the Reformed Churches -- mention of Luther.

LETTER 19 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER. -- Synod of Zurich -- attempt at reconciliation between the banished ministers and the town of Geneva.

LETTER 20 -- TO PETER VIRET. -- Arrival of Farel and Calvin at Basle.

LETTER 21 -- TO LOUIS DU TILLET. -- Journey of Calvin to Strasbourg -- project of a new Assembly at Zurich -- policy of the Bernese -- in his retirement Calvin breathes freely -- news from France.

LETTER 22 -- TO WILLIAM FAREL. -- Farel called as minister to the Church of Neuchatel -- sad condition of the Church at Geneva -- uncertainty of Calvin -- Bucer's urgency to draw him to Strasbourg.

LETTER 23 -- TO FAREL. -- New efforts of the ministers of Strasbourg to attract Calvin thither -- the plague at Basle -- detail of the death of a nephew of Farel.

LETTER 24 -- TO FAREL. -- Calvin at Strasbourg -- negotiations between Bucer and the Magistrates of Geneva -- first preaching of Calvin in the French Church -- Anabaptists of Metz.

LETTER 25 -- TO THE CHURCH OF GENEVA. -- Letter of consolation and advice addressed to the Church at Geneva, deprived of her faithful pastor -- testimonies of his innocence -- confidence in God -- trust for the future.

LETTER 26 -- TO FAREL. -- Conferences of Basle -- absence of the theologians of Zurich and of Berne -- the minister Konzen -- complaints against Bucer -- a wish for the establishment of Ecclesiastical discipline -- celebration of the Supper in the French Church of Strasbourg -- the news of Germany and the Netherlands -- question addressed to Melanchthon -- domestic affairs.

LETTER 27 -- TO LOUIS DU TILLET. -- Reply to doubts as to the lawfulness of his call -- inward assurance of his calling -- declines the kind offer of Louis du Tiller -- appeals to the tribunal of God from the accusation of schism charged on him by his friend.

LETTER 28 -- TO FAREL. -- Death of Courault -- Calvin's discouragement and trust in God -- answers a question of Saunier regarding the Supper -- the faithful at Geneva exhorted not to separate from the new preachers -- affectionate advice given to Farel.

1539

LETTER 29 -- TO FAREL. -- Second edition of the "Christian Institutes" -- death of Robert Olivetan -- state of religion in Germany -- first lectures of Calvin at Strasbourg.

LETTER 30 -- TO FAREL. -- Fruitless efforts for the union of the two Churches -- synod of Zurich -- Bullinger's distrust of Bucer -- parallel between Luther and Zuingli -- Calvin thinks of marrying -- news of Germany -- policy of the ecclesiastical Electors French Church of Strasbourg -- conversion of two Anabaptists.

LETTER 31 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Excuses his long silence -- evidences of brotherly affection -- justifies Bucer -- his desire for the union of the Church of Zurich with that of Strasbourg.

LETTER 32 -- TO FAREL. -- Departure of Calvin for the Assembly of Frankfort -- the question of Ecclesiastical property -- news of Geneva -- opening of the religious conferences at Frankfort -- disposition of the Roman Catholic princes and Protestants in Germany -- policy of Charles V. -- Reformation in England -- remarkable judgment on Henry VIII.

LETTER 33 -- TO FAREL. -- Conclusion of the Assembly at Frankfort -- attitude of the Protestant princes -- conversations between Calvin and Melanchthon on ecclesiastical discipline -- opinion of the latter -- of Capito -- various details.

LETTER 34 -- TO FAREL. -- Numerous occupations of Calvin -- news of Germany -- firmness of the Senate of Strasbourg.

LETTER 35 -- TO FAREL. -- Union of the Swiss Churches first steps for the recall of Calvin to Geneva -- some details concerning his ministry and his straitened circumstances -- Lutheran ceremonies -- the Church property -- renewal of the League of Smalkald -- constancy of the German princes -- example of fidelity to the cause of Christ on the part of the town of Strasbourg.

LETTER 36 -- TO FAREL. -- Ecclesiastical news of Switzerland -- destitution of the minister Megander -- complaints addressed to Bucer -- further projects of marriage on the part of Calvin.

LETTER 37 -- TO THE CHURCH OF GENEVA. -- Recommends anew the counsel of peace and brotherly agreement to the Church of Geneva.

LETTER 38 -- TO FAREL. -- Journey of Farel to Strasbourg -- scanty remuneration of Calvin -- sale of his books.

LETTER 39 -- TO FAREL. -- Reconciliation of Farel with Caroli -- intercession of the Senate of Strasbourg in favor of the French Protestants -- answer of Calvin to the letter of Cardinal Sadolet.

LETTER 40 -- TO FAREL. -- Caroli at Strasbourg -- proceedings of Sturm and Bucer for the reconciliation with Calvin.

LETTER 41 -- TO FAREL. -- Farther details of the reconciliation of Calvin with Caroli -- the minister Alexander -- a lecture of Bucer -- negotiations of the Protestant Princes of Germany -- their answer to Henry VIII. -- French translation of the epistle to Sadolet.

LETTER 42 -- TO FAREL. -- Caroli -- encounter between William du Bellay, and the Constable de Montmorency -- preparation for an approaching Assembly in Germany -- negotiations with the King of England -- salutations addressed by Luther to Calvin -- hope of an accommodation between the Swiss and German Churches.

LETTER 43 -- TO FAREL. -- Persecutions in France -- policy of Francis I. and Charles V. -- ecclesiastical discipline -- university regulations at Strasbourg -- illness of Farel.

1540

LETTER 44 -- TO FAREL. -- Farther mention of Caroli -- discussion with Herman the Anabaptist -- good understanding of Charles V. and Francis I. -- alarm of the German Princes -- some detail of the propositions addressed to Calvin.

LETTER 45 -- TO FAREL. -- Impressions of Calvin on his recall to Geneva rigorous application of discipline in his church -- news of Germany, of France, and of England.

LETTER 46 -- TO FAREL. -- Reconciliation of parties at Geneva -- insufficiency of the ministers of that Church -- policy of Charles V. -- courageous attitude of the Protestant Princes -- favorable news from England -- cruel persecutions in France -- ecclesiastical discipline in the French Church at Strasbourg.

LETTER 47 -- TO PETER VIRET. -- Excuses for his silence -- sad news from France -- repugnance of Calvin to return to Geneva -- his comparative estimate of Capito, Zuingli, Luther, and Oecolampadius.

LETTER 48 -- TO FAREL. -- Preparations for the Assembly of Haguenau -- symptoms of misunderstanding between Charles V. and Francis I. -- severe judgment of Henry VIII. -- evils produced in the Church by the absence of discipline -- various details.

LETTER 49 -- TO MONSIEUR DU TAILLY. -- Review of the Conferences of Haguenau -- the state of parties in Germany.

LETTER 50 -- TO PETER CAROLI. -- Answer to the complaints of Caroli -- refuses to grant to him the professorial chair unless he repents of his past offenses.

LETTER 51 -- TO FAREL. -- Deputations sent to France and into England -- the Edict of Fontainbleau.

LETTER 52 -- TO FAREL. -- Sickness of Calvin -- preparation for departure to the Diet at Worms -- letter to the Queen of Navarre on behalf of the faithful persecuted in France.

LETTER 53 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- Excuses himself from returning to Geneva by the necessity of his attendance at the Diet of Worms.

LETTER 54 -- TO FAREL. -- Exposition of the motives which prevent him from returning to Geneva.

LETTER 55 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- Calvin at Worms -- he excuses himself to the magistrates of Geneva for his inability to comply with their request, on account of the mission with which he had been charged into Germany in the general interests of the Church. LETTER 56 -- TO FAREL. -- Details of the interview of Calvin with theDeputies from Geneva.

LETTER 57 -- TO NICOLAS PARENT. -- Testimony rendered to the French Church at Strasbourg, and to the pastor in charge of it during the absence of Calvin -- matters of advice.

LETTER 58 -- TO NICOLAS PARENT. -- Instructions regarding the Supper, and on various points of Ecclesiastical Discipline.

1541

LETTER 59 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- Calvin sent to the Diet of Ratisbon -- he excuses himself on that account from returning at that moment to Geneva -- advices addressed to the magistrates of that town.

LETTER 60 -- TO FAREL. -- Anxiety on account of the Swiss Churches -- approaching departure for Ratisbon -- disputes between Berne and Geneva -- calumnies directed against the Vaudois of Provence.

LETTER 61 -- TO VIRET. -- New expression of the repugnances and terrors which Calvin feels in prospect of his returning to Geneva.

LETTER 62 -- TO JAMES BERNARD -- Protests his devotedness to the Church of Geneva -- oblivion of past injury.

LETTER 63 -- TO FAREL -- Calvin at Ratisbon -- the plague at Strasbourg -- grief of the Reformer -- preliminaries of the Diet -- the German princes -- the Italian prelates -- Hungary -- the Turk -- Poland -- state of opinion -- inclinations of Charles V. -- stayedness upon God.

LETTER 64 -- TO MONSIEUR DE RICHEBOURG. -- Consolatory letter on the death of his son.

LETTER 65 -- TO FAREL. -- Affliction of Calvin -- news of the Diet of Ratisbon -- appointment of the theologians charged with the representation of the two parties -- their reception by the Emperor -- portrait of Julius Pfiug, of Gropper, and of Eck.

LETTER 66 -- TO FAREL. -- Request addressed by the ministers of the Church of Zurich to those of Strasbourg -- Calvin promises to return to Geneva -- message to Viret.

LETTER 67 -- TO FAREL. -- Results of the Diet of Ratisbon -- conferences of the theologians -- original sin -- free-will -- justification -- impossibility of agreement in the sacrament of the Supper.

LETTER 68 -- TO FAREL. -- Efforts of Bucer and of Melanchthon to effect a connection between the two Churches -- formula of concord -- feeling of Calvin on the subject.

LETTER 69 -- TO THE PASTORS OF THE CHURCH OF ZURICH. -- The expression of his sentiments in reference to the Church of Geneva -- ready return to that town if the Magistrates of Strasbourg consent to it, and if the Seigneury of Berne promise their support -- testimony of respect for the Church of Zurich.

LETTER 70 -- TO FAREL. -- Return of Calvin to Strasbourg -- news of the Diet of Ratisbon -- contradictory formulae presented to the Emperor -- reply of Charles V. -- letter to the King of France in favor of his persecuted Protestant subjects.

LETTER 71 -- TO FAREL AND VIRET. -- Communication of a letter received from Bucer -- news of Germany -- Church of Metz -- assurance given to Viret of his approaching departure for Geneva -- recommendation of two young men.

LETTER 72 -- TO VIRET. -- Excuses for his delay in leaving Strasbourg -- conclusion of the Diet at Ratisbon.

LETTER 73 -- TO FAREL. -- Prepares to depart for Geneva -- self-denial of Calvin -- absolute submission to the will of God.

LETTER 74 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- Arrival of Calvin at Neuchatel -- purpose of his going to that town.

LETTER 75 -- TO FAREL. -- Calvin at Berne -- his interview with one of the principal magistrates, and with the ministers of that town

LETTER 76 -- TO FAREL. -- Arrival of Calvin at Geneva -- his interview with the magistrates -- draws up a form of Ecclesiastical discipline -- advises Farel to moderation.

LETTER 77 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF NEUCHATEL. -- Efforts to pacify the Church of Neuchatel -- instructions given to Viret.

LETTER 78 -- TO BUCER. -- New details regarding the troubles in the Church of Neuchatel -- proceedings of Viret -- sentence pronounced by the Bernese -- the ecclesiastical Statutes of Geneva -- request for prolongation of leave for Viret -- testimony of respect and affection for Bucer -- approach of the pestilence.

LETTER 79 -- TO MADAME THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- Instructions on the subject of the Mass, and on the necessity of avoiding scandal.

LETTER 80 -- TO FAREL. -- Brotherly exhortations -- efforts of Calvin to draw Viret to Geneva -- news of that Church.

LETTER 81 -- TO FAREL. -- The Vaudois of Provence -- appeal addressed to Mathurin Cordier -- the Reformation at Paris and Lyons.

1542

LETTER 82 -- TO FAREL. -- Healing of the troubles of the Church at Neuchatel -- wise counsel given to Farel.

LETTER 83 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS. -- Restoration of the Church of Geneva -- wise and moderate behavior of Calvin -- obstacles to the establishment of ecclesiastical discipline -- duty of the magistrates thereupon -- information regarding an adventurer named Alberg.

LETTER 84 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS. -- The Reformation at Cologne -- some details on the condition of Germany -- efforts of Calvin to retain Viret at Geneva.

LETTER 85 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF LYONS. -- Stay of a Carmelite monk at Geneva -- declaration of motives for refusing to admit him to the ministry of the Gospel.

LETTER 86 -- TO FAREL -- Detail of the edifying death of the first Syndic, Amy Porral.

LETTER 87 -- TO VIRET. -- Sickness of Idelette de Bure -- the beginnings of the new ministers of the Church of Geneva.

LETTER 88 -- TO BENEDICT TEXTOR. -- Divers recommendations.

LETTER 89 -- TO FAREL. -- Excuses his silence -- estimate of the new ministers -- works and literary productions of Calvin.

LETTER 90 -- TO VIRET. -- Proceedings of Castalio -- school of Geneva -- criticism on the new ministers -- tidings of France -- domestic sorrow.

LETTER 91 -- TO VIRET. -- Instructions given to Viret for the Synod of Berne -- need of maintaining the spiritual independence of the Church -- various directions.

LETTER 92 -- TO VIRET. -- Disquietude of Calvin on occasion of the acts of the Synod of Berne.

LETTER 93 -- TO FAREL. -- Wishes for the success of the journey undertaken by Farel to Metz -- calumnies of James de Morges.

LETTER 94 -- TO VIRET. -- Origin of the disputes between Calvin and Castalio.

LETTER 95 -- TO VIRET. -- Invitation to Viret to come to Geneva -- nomination of a principal of the College of that town.

LETTER 96 -- TO VIRET. -- Approval of a letter of Viret to the Seigneuries of Berne -- the ecclesiastical property -- Italian emigrants at Geneva -- troubles caused by the differences of that town with Berne.

LETTER 97 -- TO VIRET. -- The plague at Geneva -- conduct of the ministers in these circumstances -- Italian refugees -- the question of the ecclesiastical property examined.

LETTER 98 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Numerous occupations of Calvin -- death of Leo Juda -- ravages of the plague in Switzerland.

LETTER 99 -- TO MICHAEL VAROD. -- Recommendation of a sick person.

1543

LETTER 100 -- TO MONSIEUR LE CURE DE CERNEX. -- Religious controversy occasioned by the plague at Geneva -- apologizes for the Reformation.

LETTER 101 -- TO PHILIP MELANCHTHON. -- Testimony of respect and of fraternal affection -- his homage in one of his books -- details of his labors at Geneva -- survey of the state of Germany and of Italy. LETTER 102 -- TO VIRET. -- Ecclesiastical particularities -- struggles to maintain the right of excommunication over the ministers.

LETTER 103 -- TO CONRAD PELLICAN. -- Offer of his services -- answers the accusations directed against Farel -- justification of Ochino -- introduces two young men.

LETTER 104 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- Calvin at Strasbourg -- expose of his proceedings with the magistrates of that town for preaching the Evangel at Metz -- the news.

LETTER 105 -- TO THE PASTORS OF THE CHURCH OF GENEVA. -- The preaching of the Gospel encounters difficulty at Metz -- intrigues of Caroli -- fraternal exhortations.

LETTER 106 -- TO VIRET. -- Relation of his proceedings at Strasbourg, and the state of things at Metz.

LETTER 107 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- Answer from the Assembly at Smalkald -- prolongation of the stay of Calvin and of Farel at Strasbourg -- preaching of the Evangel at Cologne -- war-like preparations in the Netherlands.

LETTER 108 -- TO THE AMBASSADORS OF GENEVA. -- Expose of the motives which prevent immediate return to Geneva -- Cologne news and of the Netherlands.

LETTER 109 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA. -- New delay in conclusion of the affair of Metz -- Calvin makes arrangements for his return to Geneva.

LETTER 110 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS. -- Exhorts him to quit his native country, and to retire where he can make free profession of the Gospel.

LETTER 111 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS. -- Christian counsel and exhortations.

LETTER 112 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS. -- Further exhortation to decide him on quitting his country.

1544

LETTER 113 -- TO VIRET. -- The ministerial office refused to Castalio -- the marriage of Bonnivard, Abbot of St. Victor.

LETTER 114 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Conclusion of an arrangement between Berne and Geneva.

LETTER 115 -- TO VIRET. -- Farther details of the arrangements with the Bernese -- recall of the refugees -- preparation of several works -- disagreements with Castalio.

LETTER 116 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF NEUCHATEL. -- Controversy with Chaponneau regarding the Divinity of Christ.

LETTER 117 -- TO FAREL. -- Struggles and difficulties of Calvin at Geneva -- quarrels of the ministers -- violent attacks of Castalio -- dissatisfaction of the deputies from Berne -- reappearance of the plague -- dangers of the Church.

LETTER 118 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS. -- Political and military intelligence from France and Germany.

LETTER 119 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS. -- Arrival of Monsieur de Falais at Cologne -- the sending of a minister -- pious counsels.

LETTER 120 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS. -- Christian congratulations -- hope of a speedy meeting.

LETTER 121 -- TO FAREL. -- Renewal of the controversy regarding the Sacraments between the German and Swiss Churches.

LETTER 122 -- TO BULLINGER. -- New appeal to the Seigneurs of Zurich, in favor of the Waldenses of Provence -- Luther's invectives against the Swiss Reformer -- remarkable judgment in regard to his character -- his injustice pardoned in consideration of the eminent services rendered by him to the cause of Christ.

1545

LETTER 123 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- Explanations relative to the publication of the book "Against the Nicodemites" -- appeal to the authority of Melanchthon and Luther -- troubles arising from ecclesiastical discords -- announcement of the Council of Trent -- policy of Charles V. and of Francis I. -- convocation of a Synod at Melun.

LETTER 124 -- TO LUTHER. -- Calvin submits to Luther several of his writings, of which he desires to obtain his approbation.

LETTER 125 -- TO AN UNKNOWN PERSONAGE. -- Difficulties in the way of a reunion, and doubts of the efficacy of a General Council under present circumstances -- deplorable state of the Church -- motives which prevented him from going to confer in person with the German Reformers -- his proposals to them.

LETTER 126 -- TO VIRET. -- Intelligence of France and Germany -- Synod of Melun.

LETTER 127 -- TO VIRET. -- Election of new magistrates at Geneva -- struggles of Calvin.

LETTER 128 -- TO VIRET. -- Mention of Clement Marot's metrical versions of the Psalms -- persecutions in France.

LETTER 129 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS. -- Discovery of a conspiracy for the spreading of the plague at Geneva -- punishment of the conspirators.

LETTER 130 -- TO THE QUEEN OF NAVARRE. -- Calvin vindicates himself from the charges of having intended to attack her in his book against the Libertines.

LETTER 131 -- TO FAREL. -- Massacre of the Waldenses of Provence -- Calvin entreats the sympathy of the Swiss Churches in their behalf.

LETTER 132 -- TO VIRET. -- Journey of Calvin to Switzerland -- resolutions of the Diet of Arau in favor of the persecuted brethren of France.

LETTER 133 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS. -- Directions for his conduct towards the Emperor Charles V.

LETTER 134 -- TO JOHN CAVENT. -- Consolations on the death of his wife and mother.

LETTER 135 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS. -- Information regarding a house to be sold at Geneva.

LETTER 136 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- He complains of Luther's tyranny, and affectionately exhorts Melanchthon to manifest greater decision and firmness.

LETTER 137 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Defence of the Waldenses of Provence -- artifices of their enemies -- oppression of that unfortunate people.

LETTER 138 -- TO THE PASTORS OF SCHAFFHAUSEN. -- Calvin exhorts them to redoubled efforts for the deliverance of their persecuted brethren.

LETTER 139 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS. -- Pressing entreaty in behalf of the Waldenses of Provence.

LETTER 140 -- TO JOACHIM WADIAN. -- Excuses for the long silence which he had observed towards Wadian -- allusion to the controversy regarding the Sacraments -- lively entreaties in behalf of the Provencal brethren.

LETTER 141 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS. -- Report of the near arrival of M. de Falais at Geneva -- details relative to the acquiring of a house in that town.

LETTER 142 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS. -- Letter of recommendation to Ochino.

LETTER 143 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS. -- Use of affliction -- preparation for the arrival of M. de Falais at Geneva.

+ SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN VOL. 5

LETTERS 1545-1553

by John Calvin

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 5

LETTERS, PART 2 1545 - 1553

Edited by Jules Bonnet -- Translated by David Constable

CONTENTS

1545

LETTER 144 -- TO VIRET. -- Unpopularity of Calvin -- various advises. LETTER 145 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Exhortation to glorify God amid poverty and persecution.

LETTER 146 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS -- Congratulations on the constancy manifested by her in the midst of trials -- salutations from the suffering Idelette de Bure.

LETTER 147 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Vanity of trust reposed in the princes of this world -- confidence in God.

LETTER 148 -- TO FAREL -- Captivity of Farel's brother -- ravages of the plague in Geneva.

LETTER 149 -- TO VIRET -- Dispersion of the School at Geneva -- contests at Neuchatel on the subject of church property -- Calvin's opinion of Farel.

LETTER 150 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Prayers for his restoration to health.

1546

LETTER 151 -- TO FAREL -- News from Germany -- journey of the French Ambassador to Geneva -- details concerning the condition of the town.

LETTER 156 -- TO VIRET -- Calvin dedicates to him one of his Commentaries.

LETTER 153 -- TO JOHN FRELLON. -- Rupture of the relations between Calvin and Servetus.

LETTER 154 -- TO FAREL -- Reply to various questions -- terrible threat against Servetus -- imprisonment of one of the leaders of the Libertins.

LETTER 155 -- TO FAREL -- Pacification of the Church at Neuchatel -- report of the speedy arrival of the Emperor in Savoy -- dangers at Geneva -- withering mention of Francis I.

LETTER 156 -- TO VIRET -- Election of a minister at Neuchatel -- sickness of Viret's wife.

LETTER 157 -- TO VIRET -- Calvin invites his friend to repair to Geneva after the death of his wife.

LETTER 158 -- TO VIRET -- Renewed and more pressing invitation to come to Geneva.

LETTER 159 -- TO THEODORE VITUS -- Indication of the various documents wherein are set forth the opinions of Calvin regarding the Lord's Supper -- earnest desires for union and peace among the Churches -- condition of Geneva.

LETTER 160 -- TO VIRET -- Instructions to Viret about a journey to Geneva.

LETTER 161 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Calvin's labors -- the diet at Ratisbon -- the Church of Metz -- the Reformation at Heidelberg -- Apology for M. de Falais -- opinion regarding the sermons of Ochino,..

LETTER 162 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Advice regarding the editing of the Apology -- details of a loan contracted for M. de Falais -- news from Germany and Italy -- Farel and Viret at Geneva -- death of Juan Diaz.

LETTER 163 -- TO FAREL -- Troubles at Geneva -- imprisonment of the several members of the family of Fayre -- account of the assassination of John Diaz at Neubourg.

LETTER 164 -- TO AMY PERRIN -- Complaints regarding the conduct of Perrin -- firm and courageous declaration by the Reformer of his resolution to persevere in his duty unto death.

LETTER 165 -- TO FAREL AND VIRET -- Requests in favor of the faithful in France.

LETTER 166 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS -- Expression of Christian sympathy and condolence on occasion of the illness of M. de Falais,

LETTER 167 -- Excitement caused at Geneva by the Representation of a Play.

LETTER 168 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Proposals of matrimony on behalf of Viret.

LETTER 169 -- TO VIRET -- Account of the steps taken relative to his marriage.

LETTER 170 -- TO VIRET -- Fresh details regarding the prospects for his marriage.

LETTER 171 -- TO VIRET -- Same subject as the preceding.

LETTER 172 -- TO VIRET -- Breaking off of the match treated of in the preceding letters.

LETTER 173 -- TO FAREL -- Violence of the family of Amy Perrin -- declarations of the wife of Froment against the ministers of Geneva.

LETTER 174 -- TO FAREL -- Calvin's Indisposition -- literary labors -- apparent reconciliation with Perrin and his family.

LETTER 175 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Recurrence to the matrimonial projects of Viret -- explanations on various subjects.

LETTER 176 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS -- Sad communication to be made to M. de Falais -- promise to send several discourses.

LETTER 177 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Congratulations on his convalescence -- uncertainty of prospects in Germany -- confidence in the all-powerful protection of God.

LETTER 178 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Excuses for Viret -- uses of sickness -- various rumors concerning the war in Germany -- explanations on the subject of the Supper.

LETTER 179 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Consolations on the death of his sister.

LETTER 180 -- TO MADAME DE FALAIS -- Assurances of affection for herself and her husband.

LETTER 181 -- TO VIRET -- Statement of the expense of a visit to Lausanne, on the occasion of Viret's marriage -- ecclesiastical difficulties at Berne.

LETTER 182 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Military movements in Switzerland -- policy of the Cantons in reference to the Emperor.

LETTER 183 -- TO MADAME DE BUDE -- Calvin exhorts this lady to leave France, and retire with her family to Geneva.

1547

LETTER 184 -- TO THE AVOYER NOEGUELY -- Complaints of the misconduct of several ministers in the Pays de Vaud,

LETTER 185 -- TO FAREL -- Mission of Calvin in Switzerland -- dispositions of the various Cantons.

LETTER 186 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Search for a house for that gentleman in Geneva -- various details -- mention of Charles V. and Francis I.

LETTER 187 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Instructions regarding the Apology -- alarming rumors current at Geneva -- Calvin's confidence.

LETTER 188 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Disputes of M. de Falais with Valeran Poulain -- reports of the expected arrival of the former in Geneva.

LETTER 189 -- TO VALERAN POULAIN -- Severe reprobation of his behavior towards M. de Falais -- reply to a calumny directed against the Reformer.

LETTER 190 -- TO VIRET -- Weakness of the Genevese magistracy -- expectation of Viret's arrival in Geneva.

LETTER 191 -- TO WOLFGANG MUSCULUS -- Anxiety regarding the Churches of Germany -- advice to Musculus.

LETTER 192 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Steps taken at Basle to retract a promise of marriage made to Valeran Poulain.

LETTER 193 -- TO FRANCIS DRYANDER -- Confused state of the Church -- hopes and fears for the future.

LETTER 194 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- The sending of a minister -- perplexities regarding anticipated events in Germany.

LETTER 195 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Information in regard to a house -- advice on the subject of a marriage proposed for a relative of Monsieur de Falais.

LETTER 196 -- TO VIRET -- Interview of Calvin with a senator of Berne -- advantage secured over the party of the Libertins.

LETTER 197 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Recommendation of John de Bude -- uncertainty of the news from Germany.

LETTER 198 -- TO MONSIEUR DE BUDE -- He exhorts him to follow the example of the reset of his family, and retire to Geneva.

LETTER 199 -- TO VIRET -- Citation before the Consistory of the wife of Amy Perrin -- case of Gruet -- news from Germany.

LETTER 200 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Solemn lessons afforded by the sad occurrences in Germany -- troubles in Geneva -- negative attitude of Calvin.

LETTER 201 -- TO VIRET -- Indecision of the Seigneurs of Geneva -- inflexibility of Calvin.

LETTER 202 -- TO THE FAITHFUL OF FRANCE -- State of Germany -- details regarding the struggles of the Reformer in the cause of the truth at Geneva.

LETTER 203 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Thanksgivings for the happy deliverance of Madame de Falais -- false reports concerning the state of Geneva -- details regarding the publication of the Apology -- indisposition of Calvin, and his regret at being separated from Monsieur de Falais.

Letter 204 -- To Farel -- False report of Calvin's death -- proposition (query) by the wife of Amy Perrin -- calumnious accusation against Idelette de Bure -- journey of Farel to Geneva.

LETTER 205 -- TO VIRET -- Mention of a letter from M. de Falais -- Emmanuel Tremelli -- a book by Viret -- journey of Bude and Nicolas des Gallars to Paris.

LETTER 206 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS Dedication of the Apology -- mention of M. de Mommor -- sickness of Maldonado.

LETTER 207 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- Comments by Calvin on a work by Bullinger -- state of Germany and Italy -- policy of the Cantons.

LETTER 208 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Return of Nicolas des Gallars -- stay of Farel and Viret at Geneva.

LETTER 209 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Reassuring intelligence on the state of Geneva -- restoration of Maldonado.

LETTER 210 -- TO FAREL -- Sad state of the Republic -- discouragement of the Reformer.

LETTER 211 -- TO VIRET -- Rising at the Hotel de Ville. -- heroic bearing of Calvin -- trust in God alone.

LETTER 212 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Printing of The Apology -- troubles at Geneva.

LETTER 213 -- TO VIRET -- Invitation to come to Geneva.

LETTER 214 -- TO FAREL -- Publication of The Antidote -- statement regarding the condition of Geneva.

LETTER 215 -- TO THE FAMILY OF BUDE -- Consolations on occasion of the Death of one of its Members.

1548

LETTER 216 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Cost of printing of The Apology -- despatch of several copies.

LETTER 217 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Particulars regarding his departure, and the purchase of a property near Geneva.

LETTER 218 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- Brotherly explanations regarding the difference on the subject of the Communion.

LETTER 219 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS Obstacles to his departure -- delay of some months.

LETTER 220 -- TO FAREL -- Distressing condition of the Swiss churches.

LETTER 221 -- TO FAREL AND VIRET -- Disputes among the ministers of Berne -- and Calvin's journey thither.

LETTER 222 -- TO VIRET -- Communications regarding affairs at Berne.

LETTER 223 -- TO VIRET -- Ecclesiastical tyranny of the Seigneurs of Berne -- sojourn of Idelette de Bure at Lausanne.

LETTER 224 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- New explanations regarding the Supper -- violence of some of the Bernese ministers -- Calvinism and Buceranism.

LETTER 225 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Preparations for the marriage of Mademoiselle de Wilergy, his relation.

LETTER 226 -- TO FAREL -- Uncertainty regarding the disposition of the Cantons -- stay of Monsieur and Madame de Falais in Calvin's house.

LETTER 227 -- TO VIRET -- Embarrassment occasioned to Calvin by the treacherous publication of one of his letters to Viret.

LETTER 228 -- TO A FRENCH SEIGNEUR -- Exhortation to come to Geneva, that he might there serve the Lord faithfully.

LETTER 229 -- TO THE PROTECTOR SOMERSET -- Duties imposed on the Protector by the high orifice which he holds -- plan of a complete reformation in England -- preaching of the pure word of God -- rooting out of abuses -- correction of vices and scandalous offenses.

LETTER 230 -- TO FAREL -- Election of new magistrates at Geneva -- troubles in France -- letter from Bucer.

LETTER 231 -- TO JOHN STURM -- Evidences of faith and Christian steadfastness, amid the dangers that threaten the Church.

1549

LETTER 232 -- TO MADAME DE CANY -- Exhortation to a courageous and honest profession of the truth.

LETTER 233 -- TO MADEMOISELLE DE -- Exhortations to steadfastness in the faith -- acknowledgment of liberality.

LETTER 234 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF THE CHURCH OF MONTBELLARD -- Exhortations to discharge to the end their ministerial duties.

LETTER 235 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- Hope of Union with the theologians of Zurich -- dedication of several writings.

LETTER 236 -- TO BUCER -- Consolations to be found in the study of divine and everlasting truth.

LETTER 237 -- TO THE PASTORS OF THE CHURCH OF BERNE -- Desire of union between the Churches of Berne and Geneva.

LETTER 238 -- TO VIRET -- Death of Idelette de Bure, the wife of Calvin.

LETTER 239 -- TO FAREL -- Further details regarding the death of Idelette de Bure.

LETTER 240 -- TO MADAME DE CANY -- Account of the instructive death of Madame Laurent de Normandie.

LETTER 241 -- TO VIRET -- Various particulars -- recommendation of Francis Hotman, Jurisconsult.

LETTER 242 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- Pleading in favor of the alliance of the Reformed Cantons with France,.

LETTER 243 -- TO MADAME DE LA ROCHE-POSAY -- He exhorts her and her companions to live in conformity with the law of God.

LETTER 244 -- TO BUCER -- Encouragements and consolations -- desire for the conclusion of peace between France and England -- excesses of the ultra-Lutheran party in Switzerland and Germany -- agreement between the Churches of Geneva and Zurich.

LETTER 245 -- TO LADY ANNE SEYMOUR -- Thanks to the Duchess of Somerset, the mother of Anne Seymour -- exhortation to perseverance in the true faith.

LETTER 246 -- TO FAREL -- Reply by the Protector of England to a letter from Calvin.

LETTER 247 -- TO FAREL -- Imprisonment of two brothers of M. de Falais -- persecution in the Low Countries and in France.

LETTER 248 -- TO VIRET -- Negotiations in reference to the publication of the Consensus -- George, Count of Montbeliard.

LETTER 249 -- TO THE PASTORS OF THE CHURCH OF ZURICH -- Urgent recommendation of the adoption of a fixed formulary in the celebration of the Lord's Supper.

LETTER 250 -- TO BULLINGER -- Revisal of the Formulary -- persecutions in France.

LETTER 251 -- TO FAREL AND VIRET -- Letter concerning Vergerio -- history of Francis Spira.

LETTER 252 -- TO FAREL -- Criticism on a work by Farel.

LETTER 253 -- TO VIRET -- First mention of Theodore Beza -- poverty of Calvin's colleagues.

LETTER 254 -- TO JOHN HALLER -- A reformer's complaints on the malevolence of the Bernese ministers.

LETTER 255 -- TO WOLFGANG MUSCULUS. -- Prohibition of the Vaudois Conferences -- remonstrances on the intolerance of the Bernese ministers towards those of France.

LETTER 256 -- TO MONSIEUR DE SAINT LAURENS -- Statement of leading articles of the Reformed Faith.

1550

LETTER 257 -- TO THE PROTECTOR SOMERSET -- Congratulations on the royal favor shown to the Duke of Somerset -- use to be made of his influence for spreading the Gospel in England,

LETTER 258 -- TO FAREL -- Tidings from Germany and England -- recommendation of a domestic.

LETTER 259 -- TO FAREL -- Election of a new Pope.

LETTER 260 -- TO FRANCIS DRYANDER -- Counsels and encouragements -- collection of Commentaries on Isaiah by Des Gallars.

LETTER 261 -- TO NICOLAS COLLADON -- Settlement of the Colladon family at Geneva.

LETTER 262 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF GENEVA -- Notice of a publication attributed to Gruet

LETTER 263 -- TO MELANCTHON -- Controversies excited in Germany by the establishment of the Interim -- brotherly reproofs.

LETTER 264 -- TO VIRET -- Hope of an early visit from Viret -- projected excursions in the neighborhood of Geneva.

LETTER 265 -- TO FAREL -- Opinion regarding Vergerio -- intelligence regarding Bucer -- letter to Melanchthon -- disputes with Berne -- literary publications of Calvin.

LETTER 266 -- TO WILLIAM RABOT -- Exhortation to the study of the Scriptures.

LETTER 267 -- TO FAREL -- Publication of the book on Scandals -- persecution by the King of France -- Bucer's discouragement.

LETTER 268 -- TO FAREL -- State of religion in England -- Calvin's literary labors -- arrival of Robert Stephens at Geneva.

LETTER 269 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Misconduct of a servant of M. de Falais.

1551

LETTER 270 -- TO HALLER -- Explanations on the subject of the abolition of the great festivals at Geneva.

LETTER 271 -- TO VIRET -- Criticism of a mandate published by the Seigneurs of Berne.

LETTER 272 -- TO RICHARD LE FEVRE -- Explanations regarding various points of doctrine in dispute between the Romish and the Reformed Churches.

LETTER 273 -- TO VIRET -- Various particulars -- literary labors of Theodore Beza.

LETTER 274 -- TO THE KING OF ENGLAND -- He exhorts him to persevere in the work of the Reformation in his kingdom -- enumeration of abuses, ceremonies, ecclesiastical elections -- universities.

LETTER 275 -- TO BULLINGER -- He excuses the infrequency of his letters, and urges the publication of the Consensus.

LETTER 276 -- TO BULLINGER -- Thanks for a document -- dedication of two commentaries to the King of England -- captivity of Bishop Hooper -- movements of the Emperor in Germany.

LETTER 277 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- Mention of a letter to the Duke of Somerset -- re-opening of the Council of Trent -- symptoms of war in Europe.

LETTER 278 -- TO VIRET -- Death of Bucer and Joachim Vadian.

LETTER 279 -- TO FAREL -- Renewed expressions of regret for the death of Vadian and Bucer -- controversies excited by Osiander -- numerous migrations to Geneva -- commencement of hostilities in Italy.

LETTER 280 -- TO A FRENCH GENTLEMAN -- Sickness of Theodore Beza -- Calvin's grief.

LETTER 281 -- TO THE DUKE OF SOMERSET -- Protestations of attachment -- reforms required in the Church of England -- squandering of the revenues of benefices and of the universities.

LETTER 282 -- TO VIRET -- Reply to the attacks of Pighius, and of George of Sicily.

LETTER 283 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF NEUCHATEL -- Arrest of a minister from Neuchatel in France -- steps for obtaining his release.

LETTER 284 -- TO BULLINGER -- Edict of Chateaubriand, in France -- attacks on Calvin in Geneva.

LETTER 285 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF SWITZERLAND. -- Statement of the controversy with Bolsec regarding Election.

LETTER 286 -- TO OSWALD MYCONIUS -- Recommendations regarding the dispute with Bolsec -- request on behalf of the Protestants of France.

LETTER 287 -- TO CHRISTOPHER FABRI -- Calvin's dissatisfaction with the reply of the Ministers of Bale, and the conduct of Monsieur de Falais regarding the affair with Bolsec.

LETTER 288 -- TO FAREL -- Recommendation of a schoolmaster -- complaints against the ministers of Zurich.

LETTER 289 -- TO LELIO SOCIN -- Refusal to reply to the curious questions proposed to him by Socin.

1552

LETTER 290 -- TO BULLINGER -- Thanks for the zeal manifested on behalf of the faithful in France -- complaints of the conduct of the ministers of Zurich in the affair of Bolsec.

LETTER 291 -- TO FAREL -- Fresh complaints by Calvin against the ministers of Zurich and Berne -- his unpopularity in the latter city -- advises to Farel.

LETTER 292 -- TO MADAME DE CANY -- Rigorous and inflexible spirit of Calvin against heresy -- praise of Theodore Beza.

LETTER 293 -- TO BULLINGER -- Journey of Calvin and Farel in Switzerland -- steps in favor of the Reformed in France -- return to the affairs of Bolsec.

LETTER 294 -- TO CRANMER -- Agreement to the proposal for assembling a General Synod for the more close union of the Reformed Churches.

LETTER 295 -- TO BULLINGER -- Fresh details regarding the persecutions in France.

LETTER 296 -- TO THE FIVE PRISONERS OF LYONS -- MARTIAL ALBA, PETER ESCRIVAIN, CHARLES FAVRE, PETER NAVIHERES, BERNARD SEGUIN -- Information on various doctrinal points, and assurances of Christian sympathy.

LETTER 297 -- TO EDWARD VI. Dedication of a new work, and Christian exhortations.

LETTER 298 -- TO CRANMER -- Calvin exhorts him to prosecute with fresh zeal the reformation of the Church in England, by purging it of the relics of Popery.

LETTER 299 -- TO JOHN LINER -- Thanks for the zeal manifested by him on behalf of the prisoners of Lyon.

LETTER 300 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH IN LONDON -- Exhortations to harmony -- Is it lawful to call Mary the Mother of God, and to pray for the Pope?

LETTER 301 -- TO THE SEIGNEURS OF GENEVA -- Reply of Calvin to the Syndics of Geneva in the case of Trolliet.

LETTER 302 -- TO FAREL -- Conspiracy of the Libertins -- energy of the Reformer -- struggles of Viret at Lausanne.

LETTER 303 -- TO VIRET -- Literary labors of Theodore Beza.

LETTER 304 -- TO AMBROISE BLAURER -- Troubles at Geneva -- sad intelligence from France and Germany -- steady in the promises of God.

LETTER 305 -- TO MELANCTHON -- Earnest desires for the continuance of their mutual affection -- disputes with Trolliet -- longing for agreement in doctrine regarding the Communion and Election.

LETTER 306 -- TO MONSIEUR DE FALAIS -- Rupture of Calvin with the Seigneur.

1553

LETTER 307 -- TO MATHIEU DIMONET -- Exhortation to patience and constancy under persecution.

LETTER 308 -- TO CHRISTOPHER FABRI -- Congratulations on the subject of his approaching marriage -- Calvin's regret that he cannot be present at the ceremony.

LETTER 309 -- TO JOHN CHEKE -- Calvin apologizes for silence, and enjoins him to use his influence with the King for the advancement of the Gospel in England.

LETTER 310 -- TO THE FIVE PRISONERS OF LYONS -- Exhortations to constancy -- mention of Oritz the Inquisitor.

LETTER 311 -- TO EDWARD VI. -- Recommendation of a French gentleman, a prisoner for the sake of the Gospel.

LETTER 312 -- TO FAREL -- Serious illness and unexpected recovery of Farel -- Calvin's joy.

LETTER 313 -- TO CHRISTOPHER AND TO THOMAS ZOLLICOFFRE -- Last steps in favor of the prisoners of Lyons.

LETTER 314 -- TO CRANMER -- He entreats his influence in favor of the person already recommended to the King.

LETTER 315 -- TO MONSIEUR DE MAROLLES -- Christian encouragement and consolation.

LETTER 316 -- TO VIRET -- Extinction of all hope in regard to the prisoners of Lyons.

LETTER 317 -- TO BULLINGER -- Assurances of respect and fraternal affection.

LETTER 318 -- TO THE FIVE PRISONERS OF LYONS -- He exhorts them to steadfastness unto the end, in the assurance of eternal joy reserved in heaven.

LETTER 319 -- TO MADAME DE CANY -- Expression of Christian sympathy under trial.

LETTER 320 -- TO THE PRISONERS OF LYONS -- He impresses on them the duty of maintaining their confession of the truth quietly and modestly.

LETTER 321 -- TO BULLINGER -- Expression of regret for the death of the King of England -- sad condition of the German Church.

LETTER 322 -- TO FAREL -- Arrest of Servetus, and institution of the process against him.

LETTER 323 -- TO DENIS PELOQUIS; AND LOUIS DE MARSAC -- Information regarding various controverted points -- exhortation to fidelity, even unto martyrdom.

LETTER 324 -- TO HIS DEARLY BELOVED THE PASTORS OF THE CHURCH OF FRANKFORT -- Request for the destruction of the copies at Frankfort of the book of Servetus.

LETTER 325 -- TO VIRET -- Troubles at Geneva -- Berthelier and the chiefs of the Libertins are refused admission to the Lord's Table.

LETTER 326 -- TO HENRY BULLINGER -- Deep anxiety on account of the condition of the English Churches -- Conference of the Swiss Churches in regard to Servetus.

LETTER 327 -- TO SULZER -- Statement of the errors of Servetus, and of the duty of the Christian magistrate to repress them.

LETTER 328 -- TO A CAPTIVE LADY -- He consoles her under her trials, and exhorts her to use every means to secure her retreat to Geneva.

LETTER 329 -- TO THE BELIEVERS IN THE ISLES -- Religious counsels, and announcement of the sending of a minister.

LETTER 330 -- TO FAREL -- Acknowledgment of Farel's care for the Church of Geneva.

LETTER 331 -- TO FAREL -- Deliverance by the Swiss Churches regarding Servetus -- vain efforts of Calvin to obtain a mitigation of his punishment.

LETTER 332 -- TO MADAME DE PONS -- He encourages her to come out of the spiritual bondage in which she is held.

LETTER 333 -- TO VIRET -- Recommendation of several English refugees in Switzerland.

LETTER 334 -- TO BULLINGER -- Appeal to the Magistrates of Zurich in reference to ecclesiastical discipline -- thanks for the aid afforded by the ministers of that Church in the affair of Servetus.

LETTER 335 -- TO THE PASTORS AND DOCTORS OF THE CHURCH OF ZURICH -- Account of the struggles at Geneva for the maintenance of ecclesiastical discipline -- appeal to the Pastors of Zurich for their influence with the magistrates of that town.

LETTER 336 -- TO BULLINGER -- Fresh details regarding ecclesiastical discipline -- hope of speedy realization -- announcement of the publication of a book against the errors of Servetus.

LETTER 337 -- TO FAREL -- Assistance afforded to the faithful refugees in Switzerland -- reply of the Churches on the subject of ecclesiastical discipline.

LETTER 338 -- TO AN ITALIAN LADY -- He exhorts her to withdraw, by a voluntary exile, from the persecution and idolatry reigning in Italy.

LETTER 339 -- TO A SEIGNEUR OF JERSEY -- Christian exhortations -- sending of a minister.

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN VOL. 6

LETTERS 1554-1558

by John Calvin

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 6

LETTERS, PART 3

1554-1558

CONTENTS

1554

LETTER 340 -- TO VIRET. -- Consolations and encouragements -- election of the New Syndics at Geneva.

LETTER 341 -- TO AMBROSE BLAURER. -- Friendly complaints respecting the silence of Blaurer -- despatch of several writings.

LETTER 342 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Reconciliation of parties -- apparent tranquillity of the republic -- announces the book against the errors of Servetus.

LETTER 343 -- TO A SEIGNEUR OF PIEDMONT. -- He exhorts him to perseverance in the faith, in giving his children a christian education.

LETTER 344 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF ORBE. -- Vows and counsels for the establishment of religious unity in their city by the abolition of the Catholic worship.

LETTER 345 -- TO VIRET. -- Recommendation of several English and Scotch refugees.

LETTER 346 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF WEZEL. -- Entreaty not to break the unity of the Church because of some diversities in the ceremonies.

LETTER 347 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Recommendation of two English refugees -- state of parties at Geneva -- fresh persecutions in France -- military movements of Henry II. -- thanks for a work sent him -- publication at Bale of a pamphlet on the repression of heresy by the sword of the magistrate -- divers salutations.

LETTER 348 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Explanations respecting the book against the errors of Servetus -- answers to three questions of Knox.

LETTER 349 -- TO FAREL. -- Gloomy prospects of Geneva -- foreign news -- ultra-Lutheran intolerance in Germany.

LETTER 350 -- TO JOHN LASKI. -- Expression of sympathy under his trials -- loud complaints of the intolerance of the German theologians.

LETTER 351 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF POITOU. -- Christian exhortations -- instructions relative to the use of the Sacraments.

LETTER 352 -- TO MADAME DE CANY. -- He urges her to quit the spiritual bondage in which she is held captive, by withdrawing to Geneva.

LETTER 353 -- To CHARLES DUMOULIN. -- Congratulations on the subject of the chair obtained by Dumoulin in the University of Tubingen -- eulogium of Melchior Wolmar -- sage counsels.

LETTER 354 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- -He sends to her a minister to support her amid the persecutions which she endures for the cause of truth.

LETTER 355 -- TO SULZER. -- Revival of the Sacramentarian quarrel -- complaints against Castalio -- vindication of the exiles settled at Geneva.

LETTER 356 -- TO DOCTOR MARBACH. -- Defense of the French Church of Strasbourg -- explications on the sacrament of the Lord's Supper -- appeal to the memory of Luther, Capito, and Bucer -- offers to repair to Strasbourg in order to appease there the religious dissensions.

LETTER 357 -- TO JOHN SLEIDAN. -- Marks of fraternal confidence -- blame pronounced on Melanchthon -- persecutions in France and Italy.

LETTER 358 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- He engages him to defend the sound doctrine on the question of the Sacraments, and gives him an account of the steps he has taken in favor of the French Church at Strasbourg.

LETTER 359 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- He deplores the silence of Melanchthon, and urges him to apply himself to the controverted questions of Election and the Lord's Supper.

LETTER 360 -- TO PERUCEL. -- Counsels to the Church of Wezel respecting the ceremonies.

LETTER 361 -- TO VALERAN POULAIN. -- Counsels for the direction of the French church at Frankfort.

LETTER 362 -- TO GASPAR LISER. -- Influence of the writings of Calvin in Germany -- instructions relative to discipline.

LETTER 363 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF POITOU. -- Double duty to assemble together in holy meetings, and to profess publicly the gospel.

LETTER 364 -- TO A GENTLEMAN OF PROVENCE. -- Explanations on the subject of Baptism.

LETTER 365 -- TO BULLINGER -- Defense of the Consensus -- attacks of the Bernese clergy on Calvin.

LETTER 366 -- TO THE SEIGNEURS OF BERNE. -- Complaints on the subject of the invectives pronounced by several Bernese ministers against the clergy of Geneva.

LETTER 367 -- TO THE SWISS CHURCHES. -- Defense of the Consensus and refutation of a tract of Joachim Westphal.

LETTER 368 -- TO JOHN PAULE. -- Instruction relating to the manner of conferring Baptism.

LETTER 369 -- TO FAREL. -- Opinion of the Swiss Churches with regard to the Consensus -- sad news from Ferrara -- arrival of a new member of the family of Bude at Geneva.

LETTER 370 -- TO THE PASTORS OF ZURICH. -- Some explications on the subject of corrections proposed for the defense of the Consensus.

LETTER 371 -- TO LORD JOHN GREY -- Proofs of sympathy and affection for the family of that nobleman so painfully tried -- recommendation of Emanuel Tremelli of Ferrara.

LETTER 372 -- TO BULLINGER. -- New explanations on the subject of the Consensus.

LETTER 373 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- He sends him a copy of the defense of the Consensus.

LETTER 374 -- TO THE KING OR POLAND. -- The Reform of the Church the first duty of the sovereign -- refutation of the double doctrine of the supremacy of the Roman Pontiffs and of Episcopal succession -- necessity of putting an end to abuses by bringing back the church to purity of doctrine, and the priesthood to its legitimate functions.

LETTER 375 -- TO WOLF. -- Approbation of the projects of Lismannini -- struggles at Geneva.

LETTER 376 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Wishes for the successful accomplishment of Lismannini's mission to Poland -- printing of the book against Westphal and apologies on that subject.

LETTER 377 -- TO MADAME AGNES DE MICROW. -- He congratulates her on having sent her children to Zurich where they will receive a Christian education.

1555

LETTER 378 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Dispatch to the Swiss Churches of a circular letter concerning the controversy with Westphal -- defense of the Protestants of Locarno.

LETTER 379 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF STRASBOURG. -- Marks of fraternal affection. - explanation respecting the Sacrament.

LETTER 380 -- TO THE ENGLISH AT FRANKFORT. -- He exhorts them to make in their liturgy all the changes compatible with the maintenance of union and the peace of their Church.

LETTER 381 -- TO CHARLES DUMOULIN. -- He encourages him to prolong his stay in Germany, and expresses his desire that he may there be speedily joined by his wife.

LETTER 382 -- TO PETER MARTYR, -- He returns to the question of the Sacraments -- remarkable judgment respecting Bucer -- complaints against John Laski and Melanchthon -- call addressed to Martyr by the Italian congregation of Geneva.

LETTER 383 -- TO THE CHURCH OF PARIS. -- Christian exhortations -- announces the sending of a pastor.

LETTER 384 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- He exhorts her to make a courageous display of her faith in persecution.

LETTER 385 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Congratulations and thanks on the subject of the Christian hospitality offered to the refugees of Locarno.

LETTER 386 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Recommendation of Francis Lismannini, who was on his way to Poland.

LETTER 387 -- TO NICHOLAS RADZIWILL. -- He exhorts him to make the most strenuous efforts for the complete reformation of Poland.

LETTER 388 -- TO THE LORDS OF BERNE. -- New complaints against some Bernese ministers.

LETTER 389 -- TO THE CHURCH OF POITIERS. -- Answer to the accusations brought forward by M. de la Vau, a disciple of Castalion, against the Church of Geneva -- mention of the book de Hereticis -- eulogy of the exiles of England and Locarno -- divers particulars.

LETTER 390 -- TO BULLINGER. -- New difficulties stirred up against the ministers of Geneva, by the attacks of the clergy of Berne.

LETTER 391 -- TO FRANCIS UNHARD. -- He apologizes for differing from Luther in claiming the rights of Christian liberty -- dedication of one of his writings to the Princes of Saxony.

LETTER 392 -- TO VALENTIN PACAEUS. -- Description of the tribulations of all kinds by which he is beset at Geneva -- wishes for the reconciliation of the churches.

LETTER 393 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- Thanks him for his approbation of the condemnation of Servetus -- urgent entreaties to determine Melanchthon to pronounce with more firmness in the question of the sacraments.

LETTER 394 -- TO MARTIN SIDEMANN. -- He congratulates him on his moderation in the midst of the theological fury of Germany -- comparison of Luther with his disciples.

LETTER 395 -- TO THE SEIGNEURS OF BERNE. -- Statement vindicating the reforms introduced into the Church of Geneva, and complaints against several of the ministers of Berne.

LETTER 396 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Account of a journey of Calvin's to Berne, and of the false accusations directed against him.

LETTER 397 -- TO THE PASTORS OF BERNE. -- He urges them warmly to take part with him in the struggle which he is maintaining for the liberty of the ministry and the preaching of sound doctrine.

LETTER 398 -- TO THE SEIGNEURS OF BERNE. -- Respectful protestations against the sentence pronounced by the Seigneurs of Berne -- defense of the Institution Chretienne -- complaints against the ministers who pursue him with their calumnies.

LETTER 399 -- TO FAREL. -- Increased hostility at Geneva and in the neighboring countries against the writings and person of the Reformer.

LETTER 400 -- TO ADOLPH CLAUBURGER. -- Testimonies of gratitude and respect for the Senate of Frankfort.

LETTER 401 -- TO JOHN CLAUBURGER. -- Dedication of a writing to the Senate at Frankfort.

LETTER 402 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Defeat of the party of the Libertins at Geneva -- answer of the Swiss churches to the defense of the Consensus.

LETTER 403 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- New exhortations to encourage her to shew herself more and more firm in the profession of the truth.

LETTER 404 -- TO JOHN KNOX. -- Criticism of the Anglican Liturgy -- prudent counsels addressed to the parties which divide the foreign Church of Frankfort.

LETTER 405 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Account of the nocturnal riot excited by the Libertins at Geneva -- defeat and total dispersion of that party.

LETTER 406 -- TO THE SEIGNEURS OF BERNE. -- Communicationrelative to a spy arrested at Geneva.

LETTER 407 -- TO FAREL. -- Trial and condemnation of the principal Libertins.

LETTER 408 -- TO FAREL. -- New details respecting the trial of the Libertins -- pious fidelity of the five ministers in prison at Chambery.

LETTER 409 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Answer to different calumnies directed against Calvin on the occasion of the trial of the Libertins -- difficulties raised by the Bernese on the subject of the renewing of their treaty of alliance with Geneva.

LETTER 410 -- TO VIRET. -- He sends the letter of the five ministers imprisoned at Chambery.

LETTER 411 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- Fall of the French Church of Strasbourg -- grief of Calvin.

LETTER 412 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- He exhorts him to prefer the approbation of God to that of men, in pronouncing frankly against the adversaries of sound doctrine and the disturbers of the church.

LETTER 413 -- TO THE FIVE PRISONERS AT CHAMBERY. -- An account of the steps taken in their layout -- approbation of their confession of faith -- Christian salutations.

LETTER 414 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF POITIERS. -- He exhorts them to form secret assemblies under the yoke of a holy discipline.

LETTER 415 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF ANGERS. -- Christian exhortations -- he sends them a minister.

LETTER 416 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF LOUDUN. -- He sends them a minister, and gives them counsels to guide them in the difficult circumstances in which they are placed.

LETTER 417 -- TO VIRET. -- News from Chambery -- enmities to which Calvin is exposed at Geneva.

LETTER 418 -- TO THE PRISONERS OF CHAMBERY -- Last exhortations to them before their martyrdom.

LETTER 419 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF CHAMBERY. -- Obligation to confess the gospel in spite of its adversaries.

LETTER 420 -- TO FAREL. -- Fresh symptoms of the Sacramentarian quarrel -- new tract of Westphal against Calvin.

LETTER 421 -- TO RICHARD VAUVILLE. -- Christian consolations on the occasion of his wife's death.

LETTER 422 -- TO FAREL. -- Complaints about the conduct of Bullinger -- news of Saxony and Spain -- Poetry of Marcourt in praise of Calvin.

LETTER 423 -- TO FAREL. -- Lutheranism and Reform -- Palinodia of Marcourt -- wishes for the renewing of the alliance with Berne.

LETTER 424 -- TO THE CHURCH OF FRANKFORT, -- He exhorts the members of this church to be reconciled to their pastor, and not to renew the ancient quarrel of the Guelfs and Ghibelines.

LETTER 425 -- TO THE KING OF POLAND. -- He exhorts him to undertake courageously the reform of his states, in proposing to him the example of David, Hezekiah, and Josiah.

1556

LETTER 426 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Last steps adopted to obtain the renewing of the alliance with Berne -- second writing against Westphal.

LETTER 427 -- TO NICHOLAS ZERKINDEN. -- Explanations on the subject of the difference between Berne and Geneva -- wishes for the good intelligence of the republics.

LETTER 428 -- TO JOHN CLAUBURGER. -- Marks of sympathy on the occasion of a family mourning -- attempts to bring back peace to the bosom of the French Church of Frankfort.

LETTER 429 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF THE CHURCH OF FRANKFORT. -- He testifies the desire of maintaining with them fraternal relations, and invokes their protection in favor of the French Church established in their city.

LETTER 430 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH OF FRANKFORT. -- He exhorts the members of this church to make to one another mutual concessions, and announces to them a new minister.

LETTER 431 -- TO VIRET AND BEZA. -- Call of a minister to Paris -- counsels addressed to the inhabitants of the Pays de Vaud -- mention of Ochino.

LETTER 432 -- TO THE CHURCH OF ANGERS -- Counsels and exhortations to the persecuted Brethren of this church.

LETTER 433 -- TO JOHN LASKI -- Expresses a wish for the assembling of a conference, and the pacification of the churches -- judgment about Vergerio -- progress of the gospel in Poland.

LETTER 434 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Thanks for a volume which he had sent him -- the gospel in Austria and Bavaria -- Vergerio.

LETTER 435 -- TO AMBROSE BLAURER. -- Malady of Calvin -- the sending off of several writings -- explications on the subject of the conflict with Berne.

LETTER 436 -- TO THE ELDERS AND DEACONS OF THE, FRENCH CHURCH OF FRANKFORT. -- He exhorts them to calm the opposition formed against them, and to make use of their authority with moderation.

LETTER 437 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH OF FRANKFORT. -- Eulogy of the minister Olbrac -- double duty of respect and charity.

LETTER 438 -- TO JOHN CLAUBURGER. -- Complaints respecting the sad condition of the Church of Frankfort -- answer to an accusation -- refutation of the doctrine of the damnation of children that have not been presented to baptism.

LETTER 439 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Conference of Spire -- attitude of the German Princes -- suitableness of a new colloquy.

LETTER 440 -- TO BULLINGER. -- He invokes the officious intervention of Bullinger with the magistrates of Zurich, in order to put them on their guard against the intrigues of the fugitive Libertins.

LETTER 441 -- TO RODOLPH GUALTER. -- Recommendation of a schoolboy -- destruction of the spire of the church of St. Peter at Geneva.

LETTER 442 -- TO VIRET. -- Preparations for his departure for Frankfort.

LETTER 443 -- TO THE SEIGNEURS OF GENEVA. -- Reports respecting the proceedings of the Refugees.

LETTER 444 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- Necessity of a conference to terminate the religious differences of Germany.

LETTER 445 -- TO JUSTUS JONAS -- Translation of a writing of Calvin's -- wishes for the pacification of theological discords.

LETTER 446 -- TO THE AMBASSADORS OF THE LIGUES -- Answer to a demand of the diet of Baden concerning the Refugees.

LETTER 447 -- TO BULLINGER. -- New proceedings to bring about a reconciliation between Berne and Geneva.

LETTER 448 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Recommendation of an Italian refugee -- reforms in the Duchy of Baden.

LETTER 449 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH OF ANTWERP. -- He apologizes for his silence, and addresses to them christian exhortations.

LETTER 450 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH OF FRANKFORT. -- Conditional approbation given to the choice of a new minister.

1557

LETTER 451 -- TO VIRET. -- Election of a Pastor for the Church of Paris -- disorders of the wife of Anthony Calvin.

LETTER 452 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF BERNE. -- Justification of the measures adopted with regard to the fugitive Libertins.

LETTER 453 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- A call addressed to Martyr in the name of the Italian Church of Geneva.

LETTER 454 -- TO FAREL -- Complaints about the bad proceedings of the Seigneurs of Berne -- domestic grief's.

LETTER 455 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Inquiries concerning the sentence of the arbiters between Berne and Geneva.

LETTER 456 -- TO THE NOBLES OF POLAND. -- He apologizes for not being able to go into Poland in consequence of the important duties which detain him in Geneva.

LETTER 457 -- TO THE CHURCH OF PARIS. -- He congratulates the members of this church on their fidelity, and announces to them two new ministers in soliciting a leave of absence for one of their pastors.

LETTER 458 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Preliminaries of the assembly of Baden.

LETTER 459 -- TO JOHN UTENHOVEN. -- Hopes of seeing the Reform make decisive progress in Poland -- eulogy on Laski.

LETTER 460 -- TO THE COUNT OF MONTBELIARD. -- Explications concerning the Italian Antitrinitarian Matteo Gribaldi.

LETTER 461 -- TO MATTHEW PFARRER. -- Congratulates him on being re-elected to the functions of Burgomaster -- expresses his desire for the total abolition of the Catholic ceremonies at Strasbourg.

LETTER 462 -- TO CONRAD HUBERT. -- Thanks him for a private service -- ecclesiastical news -- sends him a copy of verses.

LETTER 463 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Mission of Theodore Beza to the German Princes to demand the convocation of a conference -- measures to be adopted to insure its success.

LETTER 464 -- TO JAMES ANDRE. -- Differences of opinion respecting the Lord's Supper.

LETTER 465 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- He complains of the long silence of Melanchthon, in exhorting him to shew more firmness than he has hitherto done.

LETTER 466 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF BERNE. -- Protestations against an arbitrary sentence of a Bernese Bailiff.

LETTER 467 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Theological labors -- explanation on the subject of a confession of faith presented by Theodore de Beza -- malady of Celso Martinengo.

LETTER 468 -- TO THE SEIGNEURY OF BERNE. -- Demand to annul the sentence of the Bailiff of Ternier.

LETTER 469 -- TO THE AMBASSADORS OF GENEVA, DEPUTED TO THE LIGUES. -- An order to repair with all dispatch to Baden.

LETTER 470 -- TO WILLIAM OF HESSE. -- Recommendation of a young French Seigneur stripped of his property.

LETTER 471 -- TO BULLINGER. -- He urges him to adhere to the project of the assembling of a conference -- news of Geneva and France.

LETTER 472 -- TO THE PASTOR OF ZURCH. -- The second call of Peter Martyr by the Italian Church of Geneva.

LETTER 473 -- TO MELANCHTHON -- Recommendation of a young Frenchman repairing to Worms -- military and political news of France.

LETTER 474 -- TO FAREL. -- The Marchioness of Rothelin passes by Geneva -- triple message addressed to Melanchthon -- mission of Berne to Berne and Zurich.

LETTER 475 -- TO THE CHURCH OF PARIS. -- Exhortations to peace of mind and patience in persecution -- a minister sent to them.

LETTER 476 -- TO THE WOMEN DETAINED IN PRISON AT PARIS. -- He exhorts them to persevere even unto death, holding out to them the example of the martyrs of the old and new church.

LETTER 477 -- TO THE CHURCHES OF LAUSANNE, MOUDON, AND PAYERNE. -- Collection in favor of the Brethren of Paris.

LETTER 478 -- TO FAREL. -- Mission of Bude and Beza to Germany -- complaints against the Church of Zurich.

LETTER 479 -- TO BULLINGER. -- An account of Beza's mission to Worms -- new entreaties to determine the Church of Zurich to take a part in the measures of the Swiss Churches.

LETTER 480 -- TO THE KING OF FRANCE. -- Exposition of the faith of the Reformed Churches in France.

LETTER 481 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Persecutions in the Valleys of Piedmont and at Paris.

LETTER 482 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Ecclesiastical crisis in the Pays de Vaud -- inefficiency of the first measures adopted in favor of the French Protestants.

LETTER 483 -- TO MADAME DE RENTIGNY. -- He fortifies her beforehand against the temptations which might turn her aside from courageously confessing her faith.

LETTER 484 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- He lays before him the distressing situation of the brethren in France, and begs him to take in hand their cause with the King of France.

LETTER 485 -- TO MADEMOISELLE DE LONGEMEAU. -- He exhorts her to glorify God by her constancy and fidelity.

1558

LETTER 486 -- TO THE CHURCH OF PARIS. -- Christian congratulations -- the sending of two ministers.

LETTER 487 -- TO THE CHURCH OF MEAUX. -- Pious exhortations -- the sending of a minister.

LETTER 488 -- TO THE CHURCH OF DIEPPE. -- He exhorts them to perseverance, announcing to them that a minister is sent off to them.

LETTER 489 -- TO THE MARCHIONESS OF ROTHELIN -- He exhorts her to serve God faithfully, in prosperity as well as in affliction.

LETTER 490 -- TO FRANCIS OTHMAN -- Ecclesiastical affairs of Germany -- complaints against Melanchthon -- renewal of the alliance between Berne and Geneva.

LETTER 491 -- TO THE DUKE OF WURTEMBERG. -- Persecutions in France -- refutation of the calumnies directed against the disciples of the gospel -- warm entreaties to decide the German princes to interfere in their favor.

LETTER 492 -- TO THE ELECTOR PALATINE. -- Apology for the French Protestants -- urgent appeal addressed to the German princes in their favor.

LETTER 493 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Dissolution of the conference of Worms -- complaints against Melanchthon -- sad state of the brethren in France.

LETTER 494 -- TO MERCER. -- Offer of a professorship of Hebrew at Geneva.

LETTER 495 -- TO VIRET -- He urges him to resign his ministerial functions at Lausanne, to come and live at Geneva.

LETTER 496 -- TO MADAME DE RENTIGNY. -- He blames her for her weakness, and exhorts her to show herself more courageous in the confession of the faith.

LETTER 497 -- TO MONSIEUR D'ANDELOT -- He congratulates him on his constancy, and engages him to persevere in the confession of the evangelical faith.

LETTER 498 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- Theological labors -- troubles of the Italian Church of Geneva.

LETTER 499 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- He urges him to shew himself the courageous protector of the French Protestants, whose faith he shares.

LETTER 500 -- TO FAREL. -- Matrimonial informations.

LETTER 501 -- TO NICHOLAS ZERKINDEN. -- He complains affectionately of Zerkinden's hostile attitude towards him, and defends the line of conduct he has pursued at Geneva.

LETTER 502 -- TO THE COUNT OF WURTEMBERG. -- He pleads with this prince, the cause of the ministers persecuted as heretics in his states,

LETTER 503 -- TO MONSIEUR D'ANDELOT. -- New exhortations, calculated to support and strengthen him during his captivity.

LETTER 504 -- TO THE MARQUIS DE VICO. -- Wishes for the success of this nobleman's journey to Italy -- news of Geneva and France -- divers salutations.

LETTER 505 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- Christian exhortations -- answer to a question -- news of the Marquis de Vico.

LETTER 506 -- TO MONSIEUR D' ANDELOT. -- He blames him for his weakness -- and exhorts him to repair the scandal caused by his fall.

LETTER 507 -- TO THE EARL OF ARRAN. -- Eulogiums on his attachment to the gospel, and on his zeal to spread it.

LETTER 508 -- TO VIRET. -- Blames the hesitation of Viret -- eulogy of the conduct of Theodore Beza.

LETTER 509 -- TO JOHN GARNIER -- Ecclesiastical troubles at Lausanne -- the Inquisition at Paris -- dispersion of the Church of Montbeliard.

LETTER 510 -- TO VENCESLAS ZEULEGER. -- Organization of the Academy of Deux Ponts -- letter of Melanchthon -- progress of the Gospel in France.

LETTER 511 -- TO EMMANUEL TREMELLI. -- Proposes to him a professor's chair of the Hebrew language at Geneva.

LETTER 512 -- TO THE ADMIRAL DE COLIGNY. -- Captivity of the Admiral, and congratulations on the constancy which he displays in adversity.

LETTER 513 -- TO MADAME DE COLIGNY. -- Utility of the afflictions dealt out to the children of God.

LETTER 514 -- TO THE BRETHREN of METZ -- Measures proper to assure the free exercise of Evangelical worship in their city.

LETTER 515 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF NEUCHATEL. -- He deplores the marriage of Farel, in recalling to their minds the glorious services which he has rendered to the cause of truth.

LETTER 516 -- TO FAREL -- He makes an excuse for not being able to be present at the marriage of his friend.

LETTER 517 -- TO PETER TOUSSAIN. -- Complaints of the intolerance of Peter Toussain towards some ministers of the country of Montbeliard.

LETTER 518 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Ecclesiastical affairs of Germany -- perils of Geneva.

LETTER 519 -- TO MELANCHTHON. -- Malady of Calvin -- formidable coalition of the Kings of France and Spain against Geneva -- exhortations to fraternal union.

LETTER 520 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH OF STRASBOURG. -- Blames the deposition of a minister.

LETTER 521 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- Quarrels of two ministers -- persecutions in Spain -- duties of the king.

+ SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN VOL. 7

LETTERS 1559-1564

by John Calvin

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 7

LETTERS, PART 2 1559-1564

Edited by Jules Bonnet -- Translated by David Constable

CONTENTS.

1559.

LETTER 522 -- TO WILLIAM CECIL -- Hopes connected with the accession of Elizabeth -- Wishes for the establishment of the pure gospel in England.

LETTER 523 -- TO THE PRISONERS OF PARIS. -- He apologizes for the silence which he has kept with respect to them, and exhorts them to persevere in the profession of the truth,.

LETTER 524 -- TO THE FRENCH CHURCH OF FRANKFORT. -- Warning on the subject of the new doctrines disseminated in this church.

LETTER 525 -- TO AUGUSTIN LEGRANT. -- Severe admonitions.

LETTER 526 -- TO MARTIN MICRONIUS. -- Progress of the Reformation in Sweden -- The dispatch of a writing -- News of Geneva, and Lausanne.

LETTER 527 -- TO THE PRINCE ROYAL OF SWEDEN. -- Dedication of a writing to Gustavus Wasa,.

LETTER 528 -- TO FAREL. -- Dispersion of the Churches of the Pays de Vaud,.

LETTER 529 -- TO MADAME DE COLIGNY. -- False tidings of the deliverance of the Admiral -- Consolations on that subject,.

LETTER 530 -- TO PETER MARTYR -- Calvin's illness -- Death of Lactanzio Ragnone -- Troubles of the Italian Church,.

LETTER 531 -- TO JEROME ZANCHI. -- Call to the ministry in the Church of Geneva,.

LETTER 532 -- TO FRANCIS BOISNORMAND. -- Regret for not having been able to have him called as Professor to the Academy of Geneva,.

LETTER 533 -- TO M. DE LA GAUCHERIE. -- Dissensions at the Court of the King of Navarre -- Spanish refugees -- Salutations to the young Prince of Bearn, afterwards Henry IV.

LETTER 534 -- TO M. DE COLONGES. -- Preliminaries of the Synod of Paris -- Sending of several ministers,.

LETTER 535 -- TO HOTMAN. -- Quarrels of Hotman with Francis Baudouin,…

LETTER 536 -- TO THE MARQUISE DE ROTHELIN. -- Sends one of his writings to the young Duke de Longueville -- Exhortatious to the Duke's mother,

LETTER 537 -- TO THE DUKE DE LONGUEVILLE. -- He exhorts him to abstain from all participation in the idolatries and disorders of the age,.

LETTER 538 -- TO WILLIAM CECIL. -- He exculpates himself to these ministers of the imputations brought against him on account of a writing of Knox's,

LETTER 539 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF FRANCE. -- Perseverance in the faiths -- Patience in persecutions -- Trust in God, who will sooner or lair take in hand the cause of his innocent followers,.

LETTER 540 -- TO THE CHURCH OF PARIS. -- Inutility of the steps taken in favor of the French Protestants -- he helplessness of men -- Fidelity of God,

LETTER 541 -- TO THE COUNT D'ERBACH. -- He offers him Christ inn congratulations, and consults him about a project of dedicating to the Elector Palatine the Book of the Institution,

LETTER 542 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- He pleads with Daniel in favor of one of his sons who had taken refuge at Geneva for the sake of religion,

LETTER 543 -- TO JOHN STURM. -- Complaints about the weakness and inactivity of the King of Navarre,

LETTER 544 -- TO THE DUKE DE LONGUEVILLE. -- He warns him of the dangers and temptations of the court,

LETTER 545 -- TO THE MARQUISE DE ROTHELIN. -- He urges her to show herself always more firm in the profession of the truth,

LETTER 546 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- Sufferings of the French Protestants -- Gloomy apprehensions respecting the future,.

LETTER 547 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Reply of a German Prince -- Beza at Strasbourg -- Deplorable situation of the French Reformed -- Preludes of Civil Wars,

LETTER 548 -- TO MADAME DE GRAMMONT. -- Consolations on the subject of a domestic affliction,…

LETTER 549 -- TO JOHN KNOX. -- Answers to different ecclesiastical questions,.

LETTER 550 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- News of young Daniel studying at the Academy of Geneva,

LETTER 551 -- TO MONSIEUR DE CLERVANT. -- Marks of sympathy on the occasion of the exile to which this seigneur was condemned,

LETTER 552 -- TO THE BRETHREN OF FRANCE. -- He exhorts them to redouble their faith to meet their redoubled persecutions, and to live and die for the confession of Jesus Christ, 1560.

LETTER 553 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Complaint of the unjust proceedings of Berne with respect to Geneva,.

LETTER 554 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Counsels for the education of young Daniel,.

LETTER 555 -- TO JOHN STURM. -- Severe judgment respecting the conspiracy of Amboise,.

LETTER 556 -- TO JOHN GELLIN. -- He exhorts him to leave France in order to retire to Geneva,.

LETTER 557 -- TO THE CHURCH OF VALENCE. -- Christian exhortations -- The sending of a pastor,.

LETTER 558 -- TO THE CHURCH OF MONTELIMART. -- Eulogy of the Minister Francis de St. Paula -- Prudent counsels,.

LETTER 559 -- TO THE BISHOP OF LONDON. -- Recommendation of the French Church of London -- Eulogium of des Gallars -- Wish for a complete Reform of the Anglican Church,

LETTER 560 -- TO CHARLES UTENHOVEN. -- Tokens of lively interest for the French Church of London -- Perils of Geneva,.

LETTER 561 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Renewed disapprobation of the conspiracy of Amboise -- Account of the intrigues of Renaudie at Geneva Vain opposition of Calvin,.

LETTER 562 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- Reverts to the conspiracy of Amboise -- Troubles in France -- Dangers of Geneva,

LETTER 563 -- TO STURM AND HOTMAN. -- Treacherous policy of the Guises -- New appeal addressed to the German Princes -- Petition to the king,.

LETTER 564 -- TO JOHN LUSEN. -- Anxieties about the Churches of Poland -- Refutation of the errors of Stancari,

LETTER 565 -- TO NICHOLAS DES GALLARS. -- Counsels for the direction of the Church -- Domestic news,.

LETTER 566 -- TO THE EAST OF BEDFORD. -- Agitations of Europe -- Wishes for the re-establishment of peace, and for the marriage of the Queen of England,.

LETTER 567 -- TO THE WALDENSES. -- He exhorts them to keep up friendly relations with the Reformed churches of Poland,...

LETTER 568 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- He apologizes for not having been able to send her a minister -- exhorts her to free herself from the obligation of an oath they have imposed on her, and to show herself more firm in the profession of the gospel,

LETTER 569 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Mission of Theodore Beza in France -- Counsels to the churches of that country -- Sending off of four pupils to Zurich -- Death of a minister of Geneva,

LETTER 570 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Troubles in France -- Faults committed by the chiefs of the Reformed party -- Sluggishness of the King of Navarre,.

LETTER 571 -- TO SULCER. -- Movements in Italy -- Causes of the troubles in France -- States of Fontainebleau,.

LETTER 572 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Intrigues of the Guises in Germany, and of the Emperor in Italy -- New details respecting the Assembly of Fontainebleau -- Speeches of the Chancellor, and of the Bishop of Valence -- Progress of the gospel in France,.

LETTER 573 -- TO NICHOLAS DES GALLARS. -- Domestic details -- News of the Church and Academy of Geneva,

LETTER 574 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Conspiracy of Lyons -- Journey of the King of Navarre -- Expectation of grave events in France,.

LETTER 575 -- TO BULLINGER -- Alliance of the Catholic Cantons with the Duke of Savoy -- Uncertainty of the news from France -- Death at Geneva,.

LETTER 576 -- TO STURM. -- Mission of Hotman and Beza to the King of Navarre -- Apathy of that prince,.

LETTER 577 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Unsuccessful issue of Beza's mission to the King of Navarre -- Success respecting the communication of Melancthon's letter -- Intolerance of the German Theologians,.

LETTER 578 -- TO SULCER. -- The sending of a pastor to the Church of St. Marie aux Mines -- The arrival of the King of Navarre at the court -- Attestation of the Prince of Conde,.

LETTER 579 -- TO STURM. -- Death of King Francis II. -- Inconsiderate ardor of the Reformed -- Moderating action of Calvin,.

LETTER 580 -- TO THE MINISTERS OF PARIS. -- Counsels respecting his conduct addressed to the King of Navarre,

LETTER 581 -- TO THE REFORMED CHURCHES OF FRANCE. -- Project of assembling a councils -- conditions requisite for its legitimacy,.

1561.

LETTER 582 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- He exhorts him to pursue with ardor the restoration of the gospel in France,

LETTER 583 -- TO THE QUEEN OF NAVARRE. -- He congratulates her on her conversion, and lays before her, her principal duties as a Christian princess,.

LETTER 584 -- TO THE ADMIRAL COLIGNY. -- Encomiums on the constancy of the Admiral -- Recommendation of Geneva,

LETTER 585 -- TO THE KING OF FRANCE. -- Reply to the accusations directed against the Church and Seigneury of Geneva,

LETTER 586 -- TO THE CHURCH OF PARIS. -- He apologizes for not being able to send to it new ministers -- Advice relating to the Council of Trent -- Disapprobation of the excesses committed by the Reformed in the south of France,

LETTER 587 -- TO JOHN LENING. -- Hostilities of the Duke of Savoy -- Diversion in the valleys of Piedmont and at Nice -- Unexpected preservation of Geneva,

LETTER 588 -- TO THE ADMIRAL DE COLIGNY. -- Au account and solemn disavowal of the conspiracy of Amboise,

LETTER 590 -- TO JOHN KNOX. -- Explanations on the subject of a letter -- Expression of satisfaction at the progress of the Reformation in Scotland and of sympathy for a domestic affliction,

LETTER 591 -- TO CHRISTOPHER GOODMAN. -- Pious admonitions on the occasion of the death of Knox's wife,

LETTER 592 -- TO THE CHURCH OF AIX. -- Duty of Christians to endure persecution without murmuring and without resistance,

LETTER 593 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Intrigues of Vergerio in Germany -- Portrait of the King of Navarre. -- Progress of the gospels -- Ardor of the French Protestants -- Popular massacres,

LETTER 594 -- TO AMBROSE BLAURER. -- News from France -- Mission of new ministers -- Rage of the Parliaments -- Lutheran Intolerance,.

LETTER 595 -- TO THE ADMIRAL DE COLIGNY. -- Pious exhortations -- Renewed recommendation of Geneva,

LETTER 596 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- Keen censure of the foibles of this monarch,

LETTER 597 -- TO THE CHURCH OF NIMES. -- Ecclesiastical troubles, and counsels how to remedy them,

LETTER 598 -- TO JAMES STUART. -- He engages him to persevere in his pious efforts for the advancement of the reign of Jesus Christ in Scotland,

LETTER 599 -- TO THE ADMIRAL DE COLIGNY. -- He pays homage to the zeal of the Admiral and the constancy of the French Protestants,

LETTER 600 -- TO THE PASTORS OF ZURICH. -- A collection in favor of the Evangelical Churches of Piedmont,.

LETTER 601 -- TO THE CHURCH OF SAUVE. -- Energetic censure of the acts of Vandalism committed by a minister of this church,

LETTER 602 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- Recommendation of Theodore Beza,

LETTER 603 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- He exhorts him to repair to the religious conferences which are about to be held in France,

LETTER 604 -- TO SULCER. -- Journey of Beza and Martyr to France -- Preparations for the Colloquy of Poissy -- Intrigues at the court of Wurtemberg,

LETTER 605 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- Warning on the subject of the Lutheran intrigues to introduce into France the Confession of Augsburg,

LETTER 606 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Death of Guillaume de Trie -- Penury of ministers at Geneva,

LETTER 607 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Fresh deaths at Geneva -- Distrust of the Cardinals of Lorraine and Ferrara,

LETTER 608 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Doubts respecting the efficacy of the Colloquy of Poissy -- Policy of the Romish Prelates -- Criticism of the Augsburg Confessions -- Divers particulars,

LETTER 609 -- TO THE ADMIRAL DE COLIGNY. -- He puts him on his guard against the Catholic and Lutheran intrigues -- Recall of the minister Merlin to Geneva,

LETTER 610 -- TO MADAME DE COLIGNY. -- He congratulates her on her perseverance amidst many temptations and perils,

LETTER 611 -- TO THE COMTESSE DE ROYE. -- He encourages her to persevere with her daughters in the profession of the truth,

LETTER 612 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- He compliments him on his noble attitude at the Colloquy of Poissy, and rejoices at his success,

LETTER 613 -- TO THE COMTE OF ERBACH. -- He urges him to employ his influence to prevent every attempt to introduce the Confession of Augsburg into France,

LETTER 614 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Ecclesiastical news -- Apostleship of Viret in France -- Reply to Baudouin,

LETTER 615 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Blames the excesses committed by the Reformed -- Favorable dispositions of Catherine de Medicis -- Escape of the Duke of Nemours,

LETTER 616 -- TO SALIGNAC. -- Congratulations and encouragement's,

LETTER 617 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Journey of Theodore Beza's wife to France -- Difficult situation of the Academy of Geneva -- Sending off of new ministers -- The Duke of Longueville, and the Duke of Nemours -- Divers salutations,

LETTER 618 -- TO THE QUEEN OF NAVARRE. -- Regret for the prolonged absence of Beza -- Writing against Baudouin -- Letter to the Queen of Navarre, mother of Jane d'Albret,

LETTER 619 -- TO THE KING OF NAVARRE. -- Severe judgment respecting the conduct of this prince, a renegado from the Reformed religion,

1562.

LETTER 620 -- TO M. DE COLONGES. -- Answer to three questions,

LETTER 621 -- TO M. DE PASSY. -- He urges him to accept the functions of an evangelical minister,

LETTER 622 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Catholic League -- Recommendations of the family of Guillaume de Frie -- Last words of that Seigneur,

LETTER 623 -- TO THEODORE BEZA. -- Imprudent concession made to the Catholic prelates -- Regrets and warnings of Calvin,

LETTER 624 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- League against the Reformation -- Complaints respecting the conduct of the Duchess of Guise,

LETTER 625 -- TO BULLINGER. -- News of Frances -- Disorders at Aix -- Progress of the gospel -- Negotiations with the court -- Synod of Neuchatel,

LETTER 626 -- TO PETER MARTYR. -- Disorders the precursors of the civil wars in France -- Opposition of the Reformer to the Council of Trent,

LETTER 627 -- TO THE QUEEN OF NAVARRE. -- Expression of warm sympathy for the trials of this princess,

LETTER 628 -- TO STURM. -- Mission Of Bude into Germany -- Duplicity of the Guises.

LETTER 629 -- TO THE CHURCH OF LYONS. -- Severe admonitions because of the conduct of one of its ministers,

LETTER 630 -- TO THE BARON DES ADRETS. -- He exhorts him to repress severely the disorders of those of his party at Lyons,

LETTER 631 -- TO MONSIEUR DE DIESBACH. -- He Urges him to send succor to the Reformed who were besieged in Lyons,

LETTER 632 -- TO BULLINGER. -- An appeal addressed to the Seigneurs of Berne in favor of the French Protestants -- Succors from England and Germany -- Juridical massacres at Toulouse -- Preliminaries of the civil war,

LETTER 633 -- TO BULLINGER. -- A petition in favor of a prisoner of the inquisition at Milan,

LETTER 634 -- TO THE CHURCHES OF LANGUEDOC. -- A collection for the benefit of the German soldiers enrolled under the banner of the Reformed churches,

LETTER 635 -- TO SULCER. -- Political and military news from France -- Catherine de Medicis -- The Emperor Ferdinand -- The Turks -- The Queen of England -- Complaints against Peter Toussain,

LETTER 636 -- TO BULLINGER. -- First religious war -- Respective force of the two parties -- Siege of Lyons -- The Duke of Nemours -- Des Adrets -- News of Germany, and the Council of Trent, 1563.

LETTER 637 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Battle of Dreux -- Captivity of Conde -- Imposing attitude of Coligny -- Theodore Beza at Orleans -- Mission of the Cardinal de Lorraine to Germany -- False news from France,

LETTER 638 -- TO THE QUEEN OF NAVARRE. -- Counsels for the abolition of the Catholic worship and the establishment of the pure gospel in Navarre,

LETTER 639 -- TO M. DE SOUBISE. -- He exhorts him to lay down arms after the conclusion of a treaty disadvantageous to his party,

LETTER 640 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Treaty of Amboise -- Strictures on this treaty concluded by the Prince of Conde without the approbation of Coligny and the principal Protestant chiefs,

LETTER 641 -- TO THE COMTESSE DE ROYE. -- He blames the conduct of the Prince of Conde, and deplores the condition of the French churches badly protected by the last treaty,

LETTER 642 -- TO THE MARQUISE DE ROTHELIN. -- He congratulates her on her firmness in the midst of troubles, and exhorts her to perseverance,

LETTER 643 -- TO M. DE CRUSSOL. -- Sad condition of France, presage of new troubles -- Double message to the Prince of Conde and De Coligny,

LETTER 644 -- TO MADAME DE CRUSSOL. -- Wishes for the happy success of the journey to court, which she is about to undertake -- Pious exhortations,

LETTER 645 -- TO THE PRINCE PORCIEN. -- He exhorts him to glorify God in life as in death,

LETTER 646 -- TO THE PRINCE OF CONDE. -- Instructions respecting the greatest advantages to be derived from the treaty of Amboise -- The sending off of a confession of faith to Germany -- Alliance with Swisserland -- Recommendation of Geneva,

LETTER 647 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- He congratulates her on her noble conduct amidst the civil wars -- Exhorts her to keep her house free from all scandal, and recommends to her an ancient servant,

LETTER 648 -- TO MONSIEUR DE SOUBISE -- Counsels respecting the conduct he ought to hold in very difficult conjunctures,

LETTER 649 -- TO THE QUEEN OF NAVARRE. -- Sending off ministers -- Claiming of a debt contracted by. the King of Navarre,

LETTER 650 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Sufferings of Calvin -- News of the court and kingdom of France -- Precautions against the Confession of Augsburg,

LETTER 651 -- TO BULLINGER. -- News of France -- Reply of Coligny and Theodore Beza to a calumnious accusation -- Siege of Havre,

LETTER 652 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Disturbances at Rouen -- Uncertainty respecting the projects of Coligny -- Calm at Lyons,

LETTER 653 -- TO MONSIEUR DE CRUSSOL. -- Answer to some scruples expressed, by this seigneur,

LETTER 654 -- TO THE ADMIRAL DE COLIGNY. -- Communications respecting the printing of a memorial -- Wishes for the prompt return of the Admiral to the court,

LETTER 655 -- TO MADAME DE COLIGNY. -- The Christian uses of sickness,

LETTER 656 -- TO THE COMTESSE DE SENINGHEN. -- He exhorts her to show herself firm in the profession of the faith and patient in affliction,

LETTER 657 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Taking of Havre from the English -- Majority of King Charles IX. -- Movements of the Duke of Savoy,

LETTER 658 -- TO THE PRINCE OF CONDE. -- Request concerning the publication of a confession of faith -- Blame of the gallantries of the prince,

LETTER 659 -- TO BULLINGER. -- News of France -- Humiliation of the Parliament of Paris and of the Guises -- False news of the death of the Duke of Savoy,

LETTER 660 -- TO MERCER. -- New proposals of a chair in the Academy of Genera,

LETTER 661 -- TO M. DE LOINES. -- Councilor in the court of Parliament of Paris -- Exhortation not to abandon his office of councilor and still less the truth,

LETTER 662 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Versatile. policy of Catherine de Medicis -- Departure of Conde -- Favor of Coligny -- Intolerance of the Guises -- Oppression of the Protestants in the provinces -- Necessity for assuring to them some guaranties,

1564.

LETTER 663 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- Counsels for the direction of her household -- Present of a medal,

LETTER 664 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- Answer to a letter of this princess concerning the condemnation of the Duke of Guise and the beatification of the King of Navarre -- Is it lawful to hate our enemies -- Eulogy of Coligny,

LETTER 665 -- TO THE PHYSICIANS OR MONTPELLIER. -- Medical consultation,

LETTER 666 -- TO THE DUCHESS OF FERRARA. -- Homage rendered to the piety of this princess -- Eulogy of her niece the Duchess of Savoy,

LETTER 667 -- TO BULLINGER. -- Sufferings of Calvin and the inefficacy of the healing art to relieve them -- News of France and Germany,

LETTER 668 -- TO FAREL. -- Last adieus,

LAST DISCOURSES OF CALVIN.

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF MASTER JOHN CALVIN,

CALVIN'S FAREWELL TO THE SEIGNEURS OF GENEVA,

CALVIN'S FAREWELL TO THE MINISTERS OF GENEVA,

APPENDIX.

1534.

LETTER 1 -- TO FRANCIS DANIEL. -- Preparations for his departure for Switzerland -- Recommendation of a physician,

1538.

LETTER 2 -- TO BUCER. -- Unsuccessful, results of the Colloquy of Berne -- Sacramentarian discord -- Remarkable judgment concerning Luther -- Violence of the Bernese Minister Conzen -- Appeal to Bucer,

LETTER 3 -- TO BULLINGER. -- An account o£ the conferences at Berne -- Vain attempt at reconciliation between Geneva and the exiled ministers -- Sad state of this church after the banishment of Farel and Calvin,

1539.

LETTER 4 -- TO ZEBEDEE. -- Pressing invitations to concord -- Apology for Bucer -- Judgment respecting Zwingli, Luther, Carlostadt -- Necessity of union, 1546.

LETTER 5 -- TO VIRET. -- Tragical death of one of the chiefs of the Libertine party at Geneva -- Discourse pronounced by Calvin on this occasion.

1548.

LETTER 6 -- TO VIRET. -- Mention of Servetus -- Marriage of the minister Merlin -- Epistolary vexations,

LETTER 7 -- TO BRENTZ. -- Message of consolation and fraternal sympathy, 411

1552.

LETTER 8 -- TO AMBROSE BLAURER. -- Sends him divers works -- News of Italy -- Belgium and France -- Disturbances in Germany -- Chastisement of Constance,

LETTER 9 -- TO FRANCIS DRYANDER. -- Consultation on the subject of a new edition of the Bibles -- Troubles in Geneva -- Apology of Calvin for himself,

1553.

LETTER 10 -- TO FAREL. -- Misunderstanding between Farel and his colleague Christopher Fabri -- Attempt to reconcile them,

1555.

LETTER 11 -- TO CHRISTOPHER PIPERIN. -- Trials and tribulations of Calvin at Geneva,

LETTER 12 -- TO COUNT TARNOW. -- An exhortation strenuously to promote the propagation of the Gospel in Poland,

1557.

LETTER 13 -- TO GODFREY VARAGLIA. -- Exhortation to Martyrdom, 1558.

LETTER 14 -- TO MACAR. -- Congratulations on the zeal which he displays at Paris -- Difficulties that stand in the way of sending off new ministers -- Letter of the king of Navarre -- Divers particulars,

LETTER 15 -- TO MACAR. -- Community Of Sufferings between the churches of Paris and Geneva -- Hope of better days,

AN HISTORICAL CALUMNY REFUTED,

LETTER 16 -- TO MONSEIGNEUR, MONSEIGNEUR DU POET, GENERAL OF RELIGION IN DAUPHINY,

LETTER 17 -- TO MONSEIGNEUR, MONSEIGNEUR DU POET, GRAND CHAMBERLAIN OF NAVARRE AND GOVERNOR OF THE TOWN OF MONTELIMART AT CREST,

LETTER 18 -- TO A BARON OF DAUPHINY.

PREFACES

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN VOL. 1

TRACTS PART 1

by John Calvin

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 1 -- TRACTS, PART 1

PREFACE

THE present Volume chiefly consists of Tracts, which, though unquestionably the production of CALVIN'S pen, and every way worthy of it, have hitherto been inaccessible to the English reader. They are somewhat miscellaneous in their nature, but, as bearing directly on the leading points at issue between Roman Catholics and Protestants, may be classed under the head of Tracts relating to the Reformation. The Tract first in order, viz., SADOLET'S LETTER TO THE GENEVESE, with CALVIN'S REPLY, derives great interest not only from the important points discussed in it, but also from the circumstances in which the discussion took place. Owing to the unchristian spirit which prevailed in Geneva, Calvin, with his colleagues, Corald and Farel, deemed themselves justified in resorting to the strong measure of declining to dispense the Communion. The popular resentment was roused, and bad men taking advantage of it, succeeded in obtaining a decree, by which those three Pastors were summarily banished from the city. It was hoped that the decree, the effect apparently of momentary ebullition, would be rescinded, and other Churches with this view interposed their mediation. But the decree, however rashly made, was resolutely enforced, and the Pastors were obliged to take what must have been regarded as their final leave. The opportunity was too tempting for Rome not to avail herself of it; and, accordingly, one of her highest dignitaries an accomplished scholar, and what was rarer in those times, a man of great public and private worth, came forward with an artful address, in which, under strong expressions of attachment to his "very dear brethren" the Genevese, and anxious desires to promote their interests, both secular and spiritual, he labored to woo them back to the See of Rome. The person best able to answer the Letter had been ignominiously exiled, and Sadolet naturally calculated, that while the resentment of the people would procure a favorable hearing to his representations, the resentment of Calvin would not allow him to expose them. From the account which Beza gives, it would seem that the former calculation was correct. Not so the latter. The whole history of Calvin's life shows that zeal for the interest of the Church was his ruling passion, and, therefore when he saw the mischief which Sadolet's Letter threatened to produce, he at once forgot his own wrongs, and labored as zealously for the best interests of the Genevese as if he had still been discharging the office of Pastor among them.

The REPLY, besides containing a triumphant vindication of the Reformed doctrine -- a vindication so triumphant that Sadolet is said to have forthwith given up the affair as desperate, is written in a spirit of meekness and candor. Calvin is even more eulogistic of his opponent than any thing in Sadolet's Letter seems to justify, and in so far gives a practical refutation of the charge that he never engaged in controversy without losing his temper and insulting his opponent. The Letter and Reply bear the date of 1539.

The next Tract of the Volume contains a series of ARTICLES, in which the Theological Faculty of Paris (THE SORBONNE) took it upon them authoritatively to declare what all religious instructors were bound to teach, and the whole Church to believe. It seems that the Sorbonnists had not been able to keep their own body free from the taint of what they called heresy, and as the most effectual method of extirpating it drew up these Articles for subscription by all their members, and by all candidates for membership.

The object being to expel every man whose convictions would not allow him to subscribe, care was taken to exhibit the most obnoxious tenets of Popery in the strongest terms in which it was possible to state them, and thereby render evasion impossible. The effect has been to give an air of absurdity to the gravest of their statements, and make it difficult to treat them with seriousness. To this circumstance, the form which Calvin has given to his Antidote is probably to be ascribed. He first gives an Article and immediately subjoins what he calls the Proof. You accordingly begin to read, never doubting that the Proof is from the pen of the Sorbonnist who framed the Article but soon meet with arguments which, though very much in the manner of a Sorbonnist, tell most powerfully against him, and reveal the fact, that what purports to be a Proof by the Sorbonnist is indeed a proof -- not, however, of the thing said to be proved, but of its opposite; in other words, is a Reductio ad absurdum by Calvin.

This mode of refutation probably told better in Paris than the most solid discussion would have done; but Calvin, apparently aware that ridicule, especially in matters of religion, is dangerous, and from its very nature an imperfect weapon, fitted only to demolish error, and not to establish truth, immediately subjoins what properly forms the Antidote, viz., a clear statement of sound doctrine, confirmed by passages of Scripture and supported by numerous quotations from the Fathers.

Some persons are so little acquainted with Calvin's writings as to imagine, that in forming his theological system he set all human authority at defiance, and deliberately opposed his own judgment to the general consent of Christian antiquity. There cannot be a greater mistake. The leading principle of Protestantism -- the paramount authority and perfect sufficiency of Scripture -- he undoubtedly did hold and strenuously inculcate, but he also venerated the early Fathers of the Church, and scarcely ever omitted an opportunity of strengthening his views by showing how well they accorded with theirs. In proof of the fact, it is sufficient to refer to this Antidote, which is rich in Patristic lore, and well merits the attention of all who desire to see a short authoritative statement of the peculiar tenets of the Romish Church, and a refutation of them equally solid and sarcastic. Its date is 1542.

The next, and unquestionably the most important, Tract of the Volume is THE NECESSITY OF REFORMING THE CHURCH, which is written in the form of an Address to the Diet which met at Spires in 1543, and bears to be presented "in the name of all who would have Christ to reign." It does not appear that Calvin was actually employed by the Protestants of Germany, but he writes in their name, and with an ability which must have been of essential service to their cause. His object being to justify the course which the Reformers had taken, he proposes to consider the three following points: -- First, The evils which compelled the Reformers to have recourse to remedies.

Second, The particular remedies which they employed. Third, The necessity of an immediate application of these remedies. It is obvious that these heads embrace the whole question at issue between the Protestants and those who, whether nominally of the Romish Church or not, favor its pretensions. The Treatise, accordingly, is not of the ephemeral interest of the Diet which gave occasion to it, but embraces the great questions by which the Church is agitated at the present day. Indeed, in reading it, one is often led insensibly into the belief, that, instead of being the production of three centuries ago, it is a powerful protest written by some modem hand against the prevailing errors and threatened dangers of our own times. It is certainly melancholy to think that the Church should still be combating errors which were so long ago triumphantly refuted; but it is pleasing to think that that refutation still exists, and is now to obtain, through the medium of the Calvin Translation Society, a circulation far more extensive than it has ever yet had. Every one who studies it thoroughly puts himself in possession of a weapon offensive and defensive, which will enable him, within his own sphere, to fight the battle of true Protestantism against open enemies and treacherous friends. The occasion on which "The Necessity of Reforming the Church" was written was well fitted to call forth Calvin's utmost powers. He had undertaken to plead the cause which was dearest to his heart before an assembly perhaps the most august that Europe could then have furnished. In similar circumstances the advocate is usually dispirited by a consciousness that his efforts will be unavailing; but on this occasion there was some ground to hope that he might not plead in vain. Not only were several Princes of the Empire, and other members of the Diet, avowedly in favor of the Protestant cause, but the Emperor himself seemed not indisposed to do it justice. The strongest passions of his mind were ambition and bigotry, and when both could be gratified, the Protestants had everything to fear. Now, however, the two passions were at variance, and it was generally supposed that when the Emperor found it impossible to prosecute his ambitious schemes without conciliating the Protestants, he would take the necessary steps for that purpose, though it should be at the expense of a rupture with Rome. Hence this Diet was looked forward to with the deepest interest by all parties.

Calvin's task thus was not merely to give a solid unimpassioned defense of Protestant doctrine, but to work upon the minds of those whom he addressed and suggest and enforce considerations which, while founded on Christian principles, would not be without influence on mere politicians. His style, accordingly, is more animated than he might have deemed necessary or becoming in an ordinary theological discussion, and passages occasionally occur which, in point of eloquence, would not lose by comparison with any thing in the celebrated Dedication prefixed to his Institutes. Those who betray their ignorance, while they would display their wit, by sneering at Calvin as a dry, crabbed, lumbering theologian, would do well to read this Treatise, which certainly proves that its distinguished author, had he been so disposed, might easily have obtained a first place in literature and political science. Happily for himself, and for the world at large, he was directed to a better course, -- a course which, while it might have seemed to have shut him out from fame, has given it to him in a purer form, and to a wider extent, than mere literature and statesmanship could have bestowed.

The expectations which the Protestants had entertained, though not fully realized by the Diet of Spires, were not altogether disappointed. Of this we have a very complete and interesting proof in the next Tract of the present Volume. The Diet decreed that, in the meantime, Protestants should continue in the possession of their rights, and a promise was given by the Emperor that no time would be lost in assembling a General Council for the final determination of religious differences. His Holiness, POPE PAUL III, appears to have been horrified at these concessions. He was equally grieved and provoked at the threatened revolt of his "very dear son" the Emperor; and having, as he says, the example of Eli before him, felt bound to eschew it, in order that he might not expose himself to Eli's punishment. He accordingly addressed the Emperor in what is designated a PATERNAL ADMONITION, warning him of the dangers to which his "evil communication" with heretics was exposing him, and concluding with a very significant hint of the punishment which his Holiness, notwithstanding of his natural meekness, might be compelled, by an imperative sense of duty, to inflict. The whole Admonition affords a curious, and, if any need it, a very convincing specimen of the arrogant pretensions of the Church of Rome.

Calvin's REMARKS are occasionally written in a harsher spirit than might be wished. The animadversions may not be beyond the Pope's deserts; but it must be admitted, that Calvin, while thinking only of what was due to his opponent, has sometimes forgotten what was due to himself. The excuse that he wrote, in the spirit of his age, though the best that can be offered, is not quite satisfactory, as it may be rejoined, that men endowed with such talents as Calvin possessed are bound not to follow but to guide, and, when necessary, to contradict the spirit of their age. Still, overlooking the occasional harshness of the Remarks, it is impossible to deny that they are full of talent and learning, and most effectually refute the arrogant pretensions of the Romish See. In particular, the Pope's unfortunate allusion to the case of Eli's sons is made to tell so powerfully against him, that Pallavicini, in his History of the Council of Trent, has judged it necessary to come to the rescue. His defense, however, is more zealous than; wise. Without denying the immoralities with which Calvin had charged the Pope, he merely argues, that such immoralities, if held to exclude the party guilty of them from proceeding against other delinquents, would put an end to all discipline and government. It may be made a question, by which of the two the Pope suffered most -- the severity of Calvin's Remarks, or the ingenuousness of Pallavicini's defense.

The next Tract in the Volume, viz., ON THE ADVANTAGES OF AN INVENTORY OF RELICS, being designed to expose the very gross delusions practiced by the Church of Rome on the most ignorant of her votaries, and being consequently intended, in a more especial manner, for those who, as they yielded to such delusions, must have held a low place in intellectual culture, is written in a very popular and homely style, and must have told powerfully on all not absolutely determined to act on the celebrated axiom, "Credo quia impossibile." The detail of absurdities and impostures given in this Tract threatens at times to be tiresome, but is every now and then relieved by the introduction and enforcement of great principles, which strike at the foundation of the whole system of Romish imposture, and completely establish the identity of its image and relic worship with the gross idolatry of the heathen.

THE LIFE OF CALVIN, though several writers have attempted to give it, is still to be written. Had the distinguished author, who had undertaken the task, been spared to accomplish it, we should doubtless have had a work entitled to take its place by the side of the Life of Knox; but the mere fact of its having employed his pen appears to have deterred others, and this important blank in Biography has hitherto been permitted to remain. In the meantime, so far to satisfy the curiosity which Calvin's readers must naturally feel to know the events of his life and the leading features of his character, it has been deemed advisable to introduce the present Volume with a new translation of the Life which was written in Latin by Beza, and is usually prefixed to the editions of Calvin's Works. It is not without its merits as a biography; but, independent of them, as containing a delineation of Calvin's conduct by an eye-witness and intimate friend, will never be entirely superseded by any biography that may yet be written. Before concluding, the Translator may be permitted to observe, that, in accordance with the views of the Calvin Translation Society, his endeavor has been to give the original as literally as he could without doing violence to the English idiom. How far he has succeeded it belongs to others to decide. -- H.B.

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN VOL. 2

TRACTS PART 2

by John Calvin

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 1 -- TRACTS, PART 2

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

THE TRACTS contained in the present Volume discuss subjects which are of the highest importance in themselves, and to some of which special circumstances give an unusual degree of interest at the present time. They conduct us over a very extensive field, presenting us both with general summaries of The Truth, in. its most elementary form, and also with learned and profound disquisitions on more recondite points, particularly on the nature of our Savior's Presence in the Supper -- a question which, in employing the pens, has unhappily too often disturbed the equanimity of the most gifted Theologians.

The first Tract in the Volume is THE CATECHISM OF THE CHURCH OF GENEVA, which was first published in French in 1536, and in Latin in 1538. In its original form, it differed very much both in substance and arrangement from the Catechism which is here translated, and which was likewise published both in French and in Latin -- in the former in 1541, and in the latter in 1545. The careful revisions which the work thus underwent, and the translations of it not entrusted to other hands, as was usually done, but executed by Calvin himself, bespeak the importance which he attached to it, and naturally lead us to inquire what there is in a Catechism, considered in itself, and what there is in this Catechism in particular, to justify the anxious care which appears to have been bestowed upon it? At first sight we are apt to suppose that a Catechism is necessarily one of the humblest of literary labors. Being intended principally for the young, it must deal with those truths only which can be made intelligible to youthful minds; and hence, as it seems, by its very nature, to exclude everything like profound and original discussion, it may be thought that when such a man as Calvin engaged in it, he must have regarded it more as a relaxation than a serious employment. In opposition to this hasty conclusion, a slight consideration might convince us that the task which Calvin undertook in framing his Catechism was every way worthy of his powers -- a task, dike delicate, difficult, and important, in which he could not fail without doing serious mischief, nor succeed without conferring a valuable boon, not merely on the limited district which formed the proper sphere of his labor, but on the Christian world.

In regard to all the ordinary branches of knowledge, it has too long been the custom to leave the composition of elementary treatises to those whose names had never before been mentioned in connection with the subjects of which they treat. It would seem to have been regarded as a chief recommendation that they themselves knew little more than the elements, and were thus effectually prevented by their ignorance from overleaping the bounds within which it was meant to confine them. But surely when we consider that an elementary treatise is a representation in miniature of the whole subject of which if; treats -- a condensation in which every fundamental truth is distinctly expressed, and yet occupies no more space than its relative importance entitles it to claim -- it seems to follow of course, that it requires for its right performance, not a mere smattering of knowledge, but such thorough mastery as may place its possessor on a kind of vantage-ground, from which the whole field can be at once accurately and minutely surveyed.

The thorough knowledge, so desirable in framing an elementary work on any ordinary subject, becomes still more essential when the work in question is a general summary from which Christian Societies are to receive their earliest notions, and hence, in all probability, their deepest impressions of religious truth. There the increased importance of thorough knowledge arises not merely from the higher order of the subject, but from another consideration to which it is of consequence to attend. In the ordinary branches of knowledge, neither the omission of truths which ought to have been stated, nor the expansion of others to a greater degree than their relative importance justifies, can lead to very disastrous results. The worst which happens is, that the learner is left ignorant of something with which he ought to have been made acquainted, and has his mind fatigued, or it may be perplexed with details which ought to have been reserved for a later stage of his progress.

In religion, the effect produced is of a more fatal nature. Here the omission of fundamental truth is equivalent to the inculcation of deadly error, while the giving of undue prominence to points of comparatively trivial importance is unquestionably a principal cause of the many controversies by which Christians, while essentially agreed, have been unhappily divided. When such points not only find their way into Catechisms, but stand forth so prominently as to become a kind of center round which the whole system of Theology is made to turn, the natural consequence is, that the persons into whose early training they so largely enter, either regard them with a reverence which, in proportion as it attracts them to their own particular community, repels them from all others, or in discovering their comparative insignificance discard them, and too often along with them, other things which though of far higher moment, had not been so carefully inculcated Christian communities have not been inattentive to the important purposes for which a Catechism is designed, or to which it may be made subservient; and accordingly we find not only that the use of them is generally diffused, but also that particular Catechisms have been so admirably framed, that the Churches to which they belong justly regard them as the most valuable of human compositions. It is unnecessary, and might be invidious to particularize; but it cannot detract from the due merits of any to say, that while this Catechism of Geneva is unquestionably superior to all which previously existed, the best of those which have since appeared, owe much of their excellence to the free use of its materials, and still more to the admirable standard which it sets before them.

Without attempting anything like a complete analysis of this celebrated Catechism, it may not be improper briefly to glance at its contents:, and the manner in which they are arranged.

The general division of the Catechism is into five heads, which treat, respectively of Faith, The Law, Prayer, The Word of God, and the Sacraments. The first head, viz., Faith, after laying down the fundamental principles,

that the chief end of human existence is to know God so as to confide in him, and that this knowledge is to be found only in Christ, contains an exposition of The Apostles' Creed, which, for this purpose, is divided into four parts; the first relating to God the Father, the second to Christ the Son:. the third to The Holy Spirit, and the fourth to The Church, and the divine blessings bestowed upon her.

Under the second general head, viz., The Law, an exposition is given of The Decalogue, each commandment being taken up separately, and considered not only in its literal sense but in accordance with the enlarged and spiritual views which have been opened up by The Gospel. The third general head, viz., Prayer, after carefully explaining that God is the only proper object of prayer, that though the tongue ought usually to be employed, the mind is the only proper instrument, and that, to pray aright, we must pray both under a deep sense of our wants, and full confidence of being heard through the merits of Christ, con-eludes with an exposition of The Lord's Prayer, which, it is stated, though not the only prayer which we may lawfully use, is undoubtedly the model according to which every prayer should be framed.

The fourth head, viz., The Word of God, treats briefly of the authority of Scripture, inculcating the duty of receiving it with full persuasion of heart as certain truth come down from heaven, and of exercising ourselves in it, not only by private reading and meditation, but also by diligent and reverential attendance on the public services at which it is regularly expounded. The last general head, which treats of The Sacraments, contains a full explanation of the nature of these solemn Ordinances, and of the most important questions to which they have given rise. Nothing which is essential to the truth seems to be withheld, but at the same time it is impossible not to perceive how careful Calvin here is to avoid giving unnecessary offense, and how ready he ever was to make all possible sacrifices to gain the great object on which his heart was bent -- the establishment of a visible and cordial Union among all true Protestants. The primary object which Calvin had in view in preparing his Catechism undoubtedly was to provide for the wants of the district in which Providence had called him to labor. The practice of Catechizing, which had early been established in the Church, and is indeed of such antiquity that some think they can trace an allusion to it in the first verse of St. Luke's Gospel, in which the word for "instructed" might have been rendered "catechized," had before the Reformation fallen into such neglect, that, according to Calvin, it was either altogether omitted, or, when in use, was only employed in teaching and thereby perpetuating absurd and puerile superstitions. One of the first and most laudable efforts of the Reformers was to revive the practice, and restore it to its pristine vigor and purity; and hence, in many instances, when a Church was regularly constituted, catechizing was regarded as part of the Public Service. This practice seems to have been nowhere more regularly and systematically observed than in The Church of Geneva under Calvin, and accordingly in the early French editions of the Catechism we find distinct markings on the margin specifying the different portions allotted for each day's examination. In this way, the whole Catechism was gone over in fifty-five Sundays, the children coming regularly forward to be examined by their Pastor, under the eye of the congregation, on that part of the Catechism which they were understood to have previously prepared. It seems difficult to imagine a course of training more admirably fitted to imbue all the Members of a Community, young and old, with the whole System of Religious Truth. The previous preparation, the public examination at which parents would naturally be anxious to prove that the due training of their children had not been neglected, and the many opportunities of incidental instruction which each lesson would afford to the Examinator, more especially on those days when that office was performed by Calvin in person, all must have contributed powerfully to the desired result, and made The Church of Geneva, what indeed it was then admitted to be, one of the most enlightened Churches in Christendom.

But though the fruits which Calvin might thus expect to reap from his Catechism, within the district; of Geneva, were valuable enough to justify the anxious care which he appears to have expended on it, it is impossible to read the Dedication without perceiving higher aims, and admiring the lofty aspirations with which Calvin's mind was familiar. While he occupied the comparatively humble office of a Pastor of Geneva, and discharged all its duties with minute fidelity, as if he had had no other sphere, if ever it could have been said of any man, it may be emphatically said of him, that his field was the world. He could not even write a Catechism without endeavoring to employ it; as a bond of general Christian Union.

In one part of the Dedication he speaks despondingly of the prospects of Christendom, and almost goes the length of predicting a speedy return to barbarism. It is not difficult to account for these feelings. In contending with the colossal power of Rome, which, though at one time apparently paralyzed, had again brought all her forces into the field, Protestants could not hope either to make new conquests or secure those which they had made, without being united. And what was there to prevent their union? Agreed on all points of primary importance, there was common ground on which they could league together, and there was also enough of common danger to call for that simple exercise of wisdom which consists in sinking minor differences on the approach of an exterminating foe. In such circumstances, it must have been galling beyond description to a mind constituted like Calvin's to see the Truth, which might have been triumphant, not only arrested in its course, but in danger of being trampled in the dust, because those who ought to have combined in its defense, and so formed an invincible phalanx, were with strange infatuation wasting all their energies on petty intestine, disputes.

Still, how gloomy soever the prospect might be, Calvin knew well that the course of duty being plain, the only thing which remained for him was to follow it, and humbly submit to whatever might be the result. He had labored incessantly to promote Christian Union, and would labor still, seizing every opportunity of promoting it with as much alacrity as if he had felt assured of its success; Hence, in the midst of all this despondency, we see him quietly engaged in what must at. arty time have been rather an irksome task, in translating his own French into Latin, because he had reason to believe, that by thus securing a more extensive use of his Catechism, he might promote the cause of Union.

The thought even appears to have passed through his mind, Might it not be possible for all sound Protestants to concur in using one common Catechism? He distinctly affirms that nothing could be more desirable; but immediately after, with that good sense which never allowed him amidst his loftiest imaginings to lose sight of what was practicable, he adds, that it were. vain to hope that this object, how desirable soever it might be, could ever be attained, that every separate division of the Church would for many reasons desire to have its own Catechism, and that, therefore, instead of striving to prevent this, the wisest course was for each to prepare its own Catechism, guarding, with the utmost care, against error, and then, on interchanging Catechisms, and learning how much they were one in fact, though not in form, cultivate that mutual respect and good will which constitutes the essence of true Union, and is indeed far more valuable than mere Visible Unity.

Though Calvin could thus easily part with the idea of a universal Catechism, he must. certainly have been gratified with the wide circulation which his Catechism obtained; and we can easily understand his feeling of honest pride, when rebuking a writer who had affected to sneer at his adherents as insignificant in number, he tells him more than once of the three hundred thousand who had declared their assent to his Catechism. In mentioning this specific number, Calvin seems to refer to The Protestant Church or France, which, after full discussion in its Synods, came to the resolution of adopting Calvin's Catechism unchanged. The resolution was not less wise in them than it was honorable, and must have been gratifying to him. Obliged to flee from his country for his life, he had ever after continued in exile, but thousands and tens of thousands rejoiced to receive the law from his mouth; and now, by a formal act, expressing their admiration of his talents, and perfect confidence in his integrity, resolved, that The First Elements of Religious Truth should be communicated to their children in the very words which he had taught them. In adverting to this Resolution, we are reminded of the sad changes which afterwards took place, when the Reformed Church of France, not so much through the persecution of her enemies, atrocious though it was, as by her own voluntary declension from the faith, became almost annihilated. If she is again to become what she once was, it can only be by retracing her steps and returning to her first faith. In adopting this better course, one of her earliest proceedings should be the formal resumption of Calvin's Catechism. The next Tracts of the present volume are Liturgical, and possess aconsiderable degree of interest, both as exhibiting the Form or Church Service, which, under the auspices of Calvin, was adopted at Geneva, and also as containing at least the germ of what still appears to some a very important desideratum -- a regular form of public worship, with such a degree of latitude in the use of it as leaves full scope for ministerial freedom.

Next follow two Confessions of faith -- the one general, intended as a Compendium for common use, and furnishing us, within very narrow limits, with an admirable Summary of fundamental articles; the other, a particular confession of the church of France, intended to be employed on a special occasion, and still justly regarded as a document of great intrinsic value and deep historical interest.

The latter confession, as its title bears, was written in 1562, during the War, with the view of being presented to a Diet of the German Empire, held at Frankfort -- a design, however, which could not be accomplished, in consequence of the way being closed.

The War here referred to was the Civil War which broke out in France between the Protestants headed by the Prince of Condo and the Catholics, headed by the Duke of Guise. In 1562, shortly after the celebrated Conference of Poissy, and partly in consequence of it, the Protestants had obtained an Edict which allowed the free exercise of their Religion. Trusting to the legal security thus guaranteed, they laid aside the concealments to which they had often been compelled to resort, and held their meetings in the face of day. Whether or not the Court, ruled as it was by a Catherine De Mediois, ever intended to give fair effect to an Edict which owed its existence much more to fear than to liberal policy, it is needless here to discuss. The fact is certain, that the Edict had scarcely been published when the Duke of Guise broke in with armed force on a numerous meeting of Protestants assembled for Public Worship at Vassy, under the protection of the law, and perpetrated an indiscriminate massacre. Instead of attempting to deny the atrocity, he openly gloried in it, and appeared at Court like one who had, by a distinguished service, merited new marks of favor.

The Protestants had now no alternative. The law, which had been most rigidly enforced, so long as it made sanguinary enactments against them, had become a dead letter the moment it pretended to take them under its protection; and, therefore, it was clear that they must either submit to utter extermination or take up arms in their own defense. Thus, not from choice:, but from the powerlessness of the law, or the treachery of those who administered it, the Protestants were hurried into war. In order to maintain it, they did not confine themselves to the forces which they might be able to bring into the field, but naturally looked abroad, and endeavored to make common cause with the Protestants of other countries. Accordingly, they not only despatched an agent to the Diet of the German Empire, which was then about to meet at Frankfort, in order to secure the countenance of the Protestant Princes, whose sympathy with them on other occasions had more than once been substantially expressed; but they also, probably through the instrumentality of Beza, obtained the aid of Calvin, who, aware of the prejudices which their enemies had endeavored to excite against them by a gross misrepresentation of their doctrinal views, employed his pen in drawing up the admirable Confession which is here translated; and which, while disdaining to conciliate favor by suppressing any part of the truth, possesses the merit of stating it in its least offensive form.

It has been already mentioned, that the existence of the War rendered it impossible to forward the document in time for presentation to The Diet, and hence, as a cessation of hostilities took place shortly after, it may be thought that the publication of the Document in such circumstances, was not only unnecessary but unseasonable, as only tending to keep alive feelings which every lover of peace must now have been anxious to suppress. It is not difficult, however, to find sufficient ground to justify the publication, not only in the value of the document itself, but also in the conviction which Calvin, in common with the most of his party, appears to have entertained, that the peace which had been too hastily patched up would not prove of long duration. The Confession thus published became a kind of manifesto, proclaiming the Religious System which The Protestants Of France entertained, and by which they were determined in future and at all hazards to abide.

The publication of some such Manifesto was indeed iraperatively required, in order to counteract the crafty policy which their enemies had pursued. Taking advantage of the serious differences which existed among Protestants, they began to profess a great respect for The Confession of Augsburg, and to insinuate that if the Protestants of France would consent to adopt it as their National Confession, the chief obstacles to their distinct recognition by the State would be removed.

The hollowness of this device is very apparent, and yet it is impossible to deny that it was dexterously fitted to accomplish the end which its unprincipled contrivers had in view. It flattered the prejudices of those who were strenuous in maintaining the Augsburg Confession, amusing them with the fond hope of one day seeing that Confession publicly recognized as the Religious Standard of all great Protestant communities; and it repressed the sympathy which they naturally felt for their suffering brethren in France, by suggesting a doubt whether these sufferings, instead of being endured in the common cause of Protestantism, were not rather the result of a bigoted attachment to the peculiarities of their own creed. On the other hand, the very mention of the Augsburg Confession, as an universal Standard, aroused suspicion in the minds of those who were not disposed to embrace it, and made them backward in soliciting the expression of a sympathy which in return for any present relief might ultimately have the effect of subjecting them to a galling yoke. It was necessary, therefore, that the idea of compelling the Reformed Church of France to adopt the Augsburg Confession should at once be set at rest; and it clearly appears, both from the preface to this Confession drawn up by Calvin, and from other documents, that this was not the least important of the objects which Calvin contemplated in now publishing it. In addition to its intrinsic worth, the interest which it excites is heightened by the fact that the life of its distinguished author was drawing to a close, and that he was already suffering from that accumulation of diseases under which, though his mind retained all its vigor, his body gradually sunk.

The next tract of the Volume introduces us to one of the most difficult questions in the whole compass of Theology one in regard to which, after centuries of discussion, the Christian world is as far as ever from being agreed. There is certainly something very mysterious in the fact, that the most solemn and affecting Ordinance of our Religion, instituted by our Savior on the very night in which he was betrayed, and expressly intended to unite his followers in the closest bonds of fellowship with himself, and with one another, should not only have given rise to the most conflicting opinions, but been converted into a kind of party badge, Communities employing their particular views of it as tests of Christian brotherhood, admitting those who subscribed to their views, and of course repelling all who declined to subscribe to them.

At one extreme, we have the Church of Rome, under pre-fence of adhering to the, literal sense, inventing the dogma of Transubstantiation, and supplanting the simple Ordinance of Scripture by The Mass, in which none of its original features can be recognized; while, at the other extreme, we have a body of most respectable Religionists not only avowedly abandoning the literal sense, but, under the pretext of spiritualizing it, objecting to every form of external celebration. Between these extremes we have a great variety of views, which seem however to admit of being reduced to three great classes, -- the views, First, of those who regard the Elements of The Supper merely as Memorials of our Savior's death and Signs of his spiritual blessings; Secondly, of those who regard them not merely as Signs but also as Seals, holding that Christ, though not bodily, is spiritually present, and is in an ineffable manner actually received, not by all who, communicate, but only by those who communicate worthily: And Thirdly, of those who, though rejecting the dogma of Transubstantiation, which asserts that after consecration the Elements are no longer Bread and Wine, but material flesh and blood, still strenuously contend for such a literal sense as makes Christ bodily present in the Elements, and consequently gives him, under the Elements, to all who partake of them -- to the unworthy as well as the worthy -- though with benefit only to the latter.

The wide difference between the first and the third views early led to a very violent controversy, in which the most distinguished Reformers were ranged on opposite sides, and too often forgot the respect which they owed both to themselves and to one another. Whether Zuinglius ever meant to maintain that The Sacraments are nothing more than empty Signs is very questionable. If he did not mean to maintain this, his language in his earlier Writings is very unguarded; but there is philosophy as well as charity in the observation of Calvin, that both Zuinglius and Oecolompadius, while intent on the refutation of the Mass, which they regarded as the worst of the Papal corruptions, not only carried their arguments as far as they could legitimately go, but sometimes, through misconstruction, seemed to impugn views which they unquestionably entertained.

It is not fair to lay hold of incidental expressions which a writer may have employed in discussing one subject, and interpret them as if they had been uttered calmly and dispassionately for the avowed purpose of conveying his sentiments on some other subject. There are few writers who could bear to be subjected to such rigorous and disingenuous treatment, and who might not be made by means of it to countenance sentiments which they would be the first to disavow. True it is, however, that expressions thus incidentally used have too often proved the sparks from which conflagrations have arisen, and the peace of the Christian world has again and again been disturbed, because great Theologians, when essentially at one, have first brooded over imaginary differences, and then allowing their passions to become inflamed, have unfitted themselves for either giving or receiving candid explanations.

Calvin was convinced that something of this kind had occurred in regard to the unhappy controversy between Zuinglius and Luther and their respective followers. He was not unaware that points of great importance were involved, and nothing would have been more foreign to his character than to represent these differences as trivial and unworthy of serious consideration; but believing them to be neither so numerous nor so vital as was supposed, he imagined it possible, by means of an honest and faithful statement on the subject, to furnish a kind of rallying point for all men of moderat9e views, and at the same time gradually calm down the violence of those who were most deeply committed in the strife. He accordingly published his Treatise on the Lord's Supper, a translation of which enriches the present Volume, and with such success that it was not only generally welcomed but received commendation in quarters from which it was least to have been expected even Luther speaking of it in terms alike honor-able to himself and gratifying to the heart of Calvin.

In this Treatise Calvin advocates the second Class of views to which we have above referred. He distinctly asserts a True and Real Presence of Christ in The Supper -- a Spiritual Presence by which Christ imparts himself and all His blessings, not to all indiscriminately, but to those only whom a living faith prepares to receive Him. To enjoy this presence, we must not seek him in earthly Elements, but raise our thoughts to heaven, and comply with the well-known injunction of the primitive Church -- Suesum Corda. Calvin seems to recoil with a kind of instinctive abhorrence from the idea that Christ is, in any sense of the term, Eaten by the ungodly; and when the startling question is asked, How, then, can it be said that unworthy Communicants are "guilty of the body and blood of the Lord?" he replies, that Christ being offered to them, as He is to all, their guilt consists not in receiving Christ, (an act which must always bring the richest blessings along with it, and to which no man can ever owe his condemnation,) but in refusing to receive Him, their evil heart of unbelief precluding the only means of access, and so pouring contempt on His holy Ordinance.

In opposition to those who rigidly insist on what is called the literal sense of The Words of Institution, Calvin shows that throughout The Sacred Volume, whenever Sacraments are mentioned, a peculiar form of expression is employed -- the name of the thing signified being uniformly given to the sign--and that, therefore, to interpret without reference to this important fact is at once to betray great ignorance of Scripture phraseology and deviate from the analogy of faith. When he proceeds to consider the modern controversies by which Protestant Bodies have been so unhappily divided, he adopts the most pacific tone, and speaks a language which it is impossible not to admire. Touching with the utmost tenderness on any errors of judgment or asperities of temper into which the great luminaries of The Reformation had been betrayed, he gladly embraces the opportunity of paying a due tribute to their great talents and distinguished services. He, bids us reflect on the thick darkness in which the world, was enveloped when they fir/t arose, and then cease to wonder that the whole Truth was not at once revealed to them. The astonishing thing is, that they were able to deliver themselves and others from such a multitude of errors. Considering the invaluable blessings which they have been instrumental in bestowing upon us, it were base ingratitude not to regard them with the deepest reverence. Our true course unquestionably is, not indeed to imitate but tread lightly on their faults, and at the same time labor diligently in the imitation of their virtues.

The doctrine which Calvin inculcates in this Treatise, and which he ever steadily maintained, has been adopted by some of the most distinguished Churches of Christendom, and in particular seems to be identical with that which is contained in The Public Confessions of this country. Accordingly, Bishop Cosens, in his celebrated History of Transubstantiation, quotes at considerable length from Calvin's Writings -- among others, from this Treatise on The Supper -- and distinctly declares (Chapter 2 section 20) that Calvin's "words, in his Institutions and elsewhere, are such, so conformable to the style and mind of The Ancient Fathers, that no Catholic Protestant would wish to use any other." The attempt at conciliation which Calvin had thus so admirably begun he never afterwards lost sight of. It became a kind of ruling passion with him; and hence, whenever in other countries men of like minds felt desirous to cooperate in this truly Christian labor, they invariably applied to Calvin. Among those who thus distinguished themselves must be mentioned Archbishop Cranmer, who held the most liberal and enlightened views on the subject of Protestant Union, which he labored anxiously to promote. Among the Zurich Letters, published by the Parker Society, are several from him, addressed to the leading Reformers, and urging them to take a lesson even from their enemies. He reminds them how the Romish Church had convoked her Council of Trent, and was vigorously endeavoring to regain what she had lost by infusing new vigor into her corrupt system; and he asks, in the particular Letter which he addressed to Calvin, "Shall we neglect to call together a Godly Synod for the Refutation of Error, and for Restoring and Propagating the Truth? They are, as I am informed, making Decrees respecting the Worship of the Host; wherefore we ought to leave no stone unturned, not only that we may guard others against this Idolatry, but also that we may ourselves come to an Agreement on The Sacrament. It cannot escape your prudence, how exceedingly The Church of God has been injured by dissensions and varieties of opinion concerning the Sacrament of Unity; and though they are now in some measure removed, yet I could wish for an Agreement on this doctrine, not only as regards the subject itself but also with respect to the words and forms of expression You have now my wish, about which I have also written to Master Philip (Melancthon) and Bullinger, and I pray you to deliberate among yourselves as to the means by which this Synod may be assembled with the greatest convenience."

In the above extract the Archbishop speaks of Dissensions and varieties of Opinion concerning The Sacrament of Unity as having been in some measure removed. This undoubtedly refers to the celebrated Consensus Tigurinus, which had been recently drawn up, and to which, as forming the next Tract in our present Series, it will now be proper briefly to refer. Though The Churches of Switzerland were substantially agreed as to The Sacraments, there were shades of difference which, so long as they were not properly defined, it was easy for the ill-disposed to exaggerate, and which even the well-disposed regarded with uneasiness, as tending to unsettle their minds, and suggesting doubts with reference to a solemn ordinance on which it was most desirable that their views should be clear and decided.

As usual Calvin became the leader in this work of conciliation, and that nothing might interfere to prevent or retard its accomplishment, though then suffering from the severest of domestic calamities, he resolved, in company with his venerable colleague Farel, to undertake a journey to Zurich. The very minuteness of many of the points which it was proposed to settle, made them unfit to be the subject of an epistolary correspondence. Such points, by the mere fact of being committed to writing, and formally discussed, acquire an importance which does not properly belong to them. It cannot be doubted, therefore, that Calvin acted with his wonted tact and practical wisdom in determining on a personal interview.

It Would be most interesting to seat ourselves along with the distinguished men by whom The Conference was conducted, and follow it out into all its details; but we must content ourselves with a simple statement of the result. The respect which they had previously felt for each other soon rose to the warmth of friendship; all obstacles melted away, and an Agreement was drawn, up, consisting of a Series of Articles, in which all points of importance relating to The Sacraments are clearly and succinctly defined. The issue of The Conference gave general satisfaction, and Calvin and Farel returned home with the blessing of peacemakers on their heads. It is scarcely congruour to talk of victory, when, properly speaking, there was no contest, and the only thing done was the establishment of peace; and yet it is but justice to Calvin to remark, that if any who subscribed the Agreement must be understood by so doing to. have changed the views which they previously entertained, he was not of the number, as there is not one of the Articles which he had not maintained in one or other of his Works.

After the Agreement was drawn up, Calvin urged the immediate publication of it. Certain parties, from prudential considerations, would fain have delayed; but this only made him more anxious to proceed, and place the great object which had been gained beyond the reach of danger. The important results anticipated from the publication of the Agreement he thus states in a Letter to Viret, (Henri's Life of Calvin by Stebbing,) -- "The hearts of good men will be cheered by that which has taken place: our constancy and resolution will derive more strength from it, and we shall be better able to break the power of the wicked. They who had formed an unworthy opinion of us will see that we proposed nothing but what is good and right. Many who are still in a state of uncertainty will now know on what they ought to depend. And those in distant lands who differ from us in opinion, will soon, we hope, offer us their hand." He adds, "Posterity will have a witness to our faith which it could not have derived from parties in a state of strife! but this we must leave to God." The important service which The Agreement performed by extinguishing strife in the Swiss Church, was only part of the grand result which Calvin was contemplating. The attempt which had once been made to reconcile Zuinglius and Luther having lamentably failed, had had the contrary effect of widening the breach between their adherents; and hence a general idea among the Lutherans was, that The Swiss did not acknowledge any Real Presence of Christ in The Sacrament. So long as that idea existed, it operated as an insuperable barrier to any Union between these Churches. That barrier, however, was now removed, as The Agreement which had been placed before the world distinctly recognized, and of course bound every one who subscribed it to recognize a Real Presence and Actual Participation of Christ in the Sacrament Hence Calvin appears to have reverted at this time more hopefully than ever to the practicability of effecting that General Protestant Union on which his hear had long been set, and in regard to which we have already seen him in communication with an admirable coadjutor in the person of Archbishop Cranmer. Calvin may have been rendered more sanguine by the fact that his views on The Sacrament were shared by the noblest intellect in Germany. Melancthon had long felt dissatisfaction with Luther's views on this subject, but his natural timidity, increased by the ascendency of Luther, had prevented him from giving public expression to it. If any scruples still remained, it was understood that The Agreement of Zurich had removed them; and it was therefore hoped, more especially as his great master had been called to his reward, that he would now come manfully forward, and avowing the belief which he undoubtedly entertained, that The Real Presence which The Agreement of Zurich recognized was the only presence which it was essential to maintain, become the advocate of a Great Protestant League on the basis of that Agreement.

But notwithstanding of all these hopeful signs, and the satisfaction which was generally expressed, distant murmurs began to be heard, and ultimately increased, so that Calvin felt compelled to come forward with the admirable Exposition of the Articles of Agreement which form the next Tract in our Series.

In the Dedication of this Treatise to his friends at Zurich, and the other ministers throughout Switzerland, Calvin expresses the greatest reluctance to be again drawn into controversy. He speaks with just commendation of the leading divines of the Lutheran Communion who had either approved of The Agreement, or, by maintaining silence, had at least proved their unwillingness to disturb the peace. On the other hand, he cannot dissemble the mingled feelings of contempt and detestation produced in his mind by individuals, equally deficient in intellect and Christian temper, who were going about as it" they had "lighted a Furies' torch," and were determined to be satisfied with nothing short of a Religious War. So reluctant, however, is he to perpetuate the strife, that though he feels compelled to take special notice of the violence and absurdity of one of these individuals, he withholds his name, that he may thus leave him an opportunity of :retracing his steps, and retiring from a contest in which, though he may be able to do mischief, he can only reap disgrace. The individual thus referred to, but not named, and who afterwards obtained at: unenviable notoriety, was Joachim Westphal, one of the Ministers of Hamburg. He appears to have been one of those who, determined at all events to obtain a name, have no scruple as to the means, provided they can secure the end. Instead of taking Calvin's advice in good part, and retiring from a contest to which he was unequal, and for engaging in which he certainly could not plead any particular call, he again came forward with a virulence and scurrility which perhaps ought to have convinced Calvin that it was scarcely consistent with the respect which he owed to himself to take any farther notice of him.

As if all Agreement were sinful in its own nature, he takes offense at the very name, and with strange inconsistency attacks Calvin at one time for abandoning opinions to which he stood pledged, and at another for not abandoning but only hypocritically pretending to abandon them! Ridiculous charges like these, which only affected Calvin as an. individual, he could easily have disregarded, but Westphal had been connected with certain atrocious proceedings which had stung Calvin to the quick; and there cannot be a doubt, that in the repeated castigations which Calvin now inflicted, he meant Westphal to understand that he was paying part of the penalty due for his share in these proceedings.

On Mary's accession to the Throne of England, a Reformed Congregation in London, under the ministry of John A Laseo, was immediately dispersed. A Laseo, who was a personal friend of Calvin, and stood very high in his esteem, embarked in a vessel with 175 individuals. A storm arising, the vessel, in distress, ran into Elsinore; but so vindictive was the Lutheran feeling there that the Exiles were immediately ordered to quit the coast. On their arrival at Hamburg, the same abominable treatment was repeated.

Westphal appears to have been personally implicated in these proceedings; and so far from showing any compunction, glories in the deed. Not satisfied with his own atrocious inhospitality, he calls upon the other towns of Germany to imitate it; and, as if he had been possessed by the spirit of a fiend, exults in the Persecutions of The Bloody Mary, as a just judgment on The Church of England for not. holding Lutheran views on The Sacraments.

The mixed feeling of pity for the poor Exiles, and indignation at the conduct of their persecutors, occasions some of the finest bursts which is to be found in any of Calvin's Writings, while throughout the whole of this Sacramentarian Controversy we every now and then meet with private allusions and digressions of an interesting nature. There is, moreover, a great amount of Patristic learning, Calvin laboring, and with great success, to show that his views on The Sacrament are in strict accordance with those of the best and earliest of The Fathers. This unhappy revival of the controversy not only opened up the old questions which are accordingly exhibited in all the points of view in which Westphal and his coadjutors were able to place them, but also incidentally, brought various other matters under discussion. The dogma of a bodily presence in the Supper naturally leads to a consideration of the possible ubiquity of our Savior's body. Westphal and his party, in maintaining the affirmative, not only. do not pretend to explain how one and the same body can be in numerous different places at the same time, but discountenance the very idea of being able to give any explanation. Assuming the fact that such an ubiquity is clearly taught, they complain loudly of the introduction of what they call physical arguments into religion, and descant at large on the omnipotence of God. In considering these arguments, Calvin is led to make many. important observations on the interpretation of Scripture, and the distinct provinces assigned to Reason and Revelation. When God speaks, men must listen, implicitly; and if what he says is mysterious, it is thereby the fitter for the exercise of an humble faith. But it is an abuse of the language of piety, to declaim about the omnipotence of God when the question considered is not what God can do, but what he has told us he will do. In addressing us at all, he treats us as rational beings, capable of understanding the meaning of language; and when, instead of attempting to pass judgment on what he has said, or to pry presumptuously into matters which he has chosen to conceal, we anxiously endeavor to ascertain the meaning which his words bear, there cannot be doubt, that in so doing we employ our reason for the very purpose for which it has been bestowed.

Another point incidentally brought forward is the great principle of Toleration, trod the power of the civil magistrate in matters of religion. Westphal repeatedly denounces the views of his opponents as heretical, and calls for their extermination by the sword. He even denies their title to be heard, on the simple ground that they have been already condemned by general consent. The absurdity of any Protestant body putting forward a claim to general consent for any one of its peculiar tenets is very obvious, and is well exposed by Calvin, who reminds Westphal, that if general consent, or rather, majority of consents, is to give the law in religious controversy, they must both quit the field, and make way for another party possessing a claim with which theirs cannot stand in competition. If consent is to be Westphal's law, a very slight change will bring him, perhaps, to the only place where he is fit to be -- the camp of the Pope. In regard to Toleration, it must be confessed that Calvin's views are not much more enlightened than those of his opponent. They both agree that error is a proper subject of cognizance by the civil magistrate, and ought, if necessary, to be put down by the sword; and the only apparent difference is, that while Westphal, listening only to the violence of passion, calls for condemnation without a hearing, Calvin strenuously maintains that such condemnation is unjust, because it provides no security against the condemnation of truth. According to his view, therefore, a candid hearing and careful examination ought always to precede.

It is curious that a mind like Calvin's could come thus far, and then stop. It is not easy to see how any degree of examination could make the condemnation to be just, which would have been unjust without it. Take, for instance, any of the numerous Protestant martyrdoms which were taking place in France at this period, and of which Calvin so often speaks in terms of just indignation. Would the murders then perpetrated, by consigning unoffending Protestants to the flames, have become justifiable, if, before sentence was pronounced, every plea which the poor victims could urge had been fully heard, and patiently considered?

Unquestionable, Calvin would have been one of the first to maintain that the proceedings were atrocious in their own nature, and could not cease to be so in consequence of any degree of strictness and regularity with which they might be conducted. It would seem, then, that the application of such a test as this might have sufficed to convince Calvin, that if Toleration was to be defended at all, it must be on broader ground than that on which he had placed it. This, however, is a subject on which the whole world was then in error. In regard to it, Calvin was certainly not behind his age. For many reasons, it. is much to be wished that he had been in advance of it; but as he was not, nothing can be more unfair than the virulent censure with which he has been assailed for acting on principles which he honestly held, and the soundness of which, moreover, was all but universally recognized.

The harmony which all good and moderate men earnestly longed for, and which at one time seemed almost secured by The Agreement of Zurich, having been broken up by the perverse proceedings of Westphal, a host of new controversialists appeared, and so uniformly fastened upon Calvin as the object of their attacks:, that in the next Tract of our volume, viz., "On the true partaking of the flesh and blood of Christ in the Holy Supper," he speaks as if petulant and rabid men had from all quarters entered into a conspiracy against him. In this work, while he proves himself still able and willing to defend the truth, he gives free and affecting utterance to his earnest longings for repose. He was suffering much from disease, and perhaps had a presentiment that his course on earth was soon to terminate. How desirable, then, that he could retire from the storm, and spend the evening of his days in peace!

To no man, perhaps:, was Calvin's heart more closely knit than to Melancthon. They were perfectly at one on the great controversy by which the Protestant bodies was so unhappily divided; and though Melanothon had not come forward and avowed his sentiments so openly as might have been expected, still Calvin had hoped much from the high estimation in which he was held by all, and the great and well-earned influence which he possessed among his own countrymen. But Melancthon was now dead; and Calvin, in giving utterance to his feelings on the event, seems almost to say that he wishes he had died along with him. There are few passages more impressive in Calvin's writings than that in which he here apostrophizes his departed friend: "O Philip Melancthon ! For I appeal to thee, who art now living with God in Christ, and art there waiting for me, till I may be united with thee in beatific rest." It were out of place to quote farther; but the passage may safely be appealed to against those who, while admitting the great intellect of Calvin, represent him as having steeled his heart against all the softer and more amiable qualities of our nature.

On many accounts, therefore, and not merely as able discussions of the subject to which they more immediately refer, the Treatises, which form the concluding part of the present Volume, constitute an important branch of Calvin's Writings, and could not be excluded from any Collection of his Works. The only subject of regret is, that from the endless variety of forms in which the different parties, whom Westphal induced to take up his quarrel, stated their objections, the answers are necessarily repeated almost to weariness; and still more, that Calvin, in dealing out the chastisement which Westphal undoubtedly deserved, has too often let fall expressions, to which such a pen as his ought never to have stooped. These, however, are comparatively trivial blemishes, which the candid reader can easily overlook, while he dwells with admiration on the excellencies with which the Work abounds.

In the conclusion, Calvin again returns to his favorite topic, and in a few brief propositions, points out The best method of obtaining concord. This subject again occupies the Public mind, and nowhere are the principles on which it ought to be attempted, or the means by which it is to be carried into effect, more ably stated than in these Treatises of Calvin.

H.B.

EDINBURGH, December 1849.

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN VOL. 3

TRACTS PART 3

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 3 -- TRACTS, PART 3

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

THE TRACTS of the present volume, four in number, have been selected partly on account of their own intrinsic value, and partly on account of the great additional interest which recent occurrences have given to some of the subjects considered in them. They contain lucid discussions on all the leading points in THE POPISH CONTROVERSY, furnish wholesome advice in answer to a question which once was, and will probably again become, of great practical importance; and refute the wild dogma which a kind of infidel fanaticism had devised, asserting, that in the interval between death and the final judgment the soul remains in a state of sleep or unconscious existence. All the TRACTS sustain the reputation of their distinguished author; and, considering their controversial nature, are not often chargeable with the virulent spirit and intemperate language in which the controversialists of CALVIN'S age were too prone to indulge.

I. -- CANONS OF THE COUNCIL OF TRENT, WITH THE ANTIDOTE.

The subject of the FIRST and leading TRACT IS THE COUNCIL OF TRENT. It is believed to be the earliest publication in which the proceedings of that body were fully and systematically reviewed; and notwithstanding all that has since been written on the subject, its use as a COMPLETE PROTESTANT MANUAL has not been superseded. It commences with an Introduction, in which the question of SUBMISSION TO HUMAN AUTHORITY IN MATTERS OF RELIGION is briefly considered. Here, while THE GREAT PROTESTANT PRINCIPLE, THAT THE SCRIPTURES are the only infallible standard, is strenuously maintained, it is admitted that the veneration in which the name of COUNCIL continued to be held, was by no means unfounded; that in earlier and purer times the Church had repeatedly derived essential benefit from the decisions of Councils; and that even now, could a GENERAL COUNCIL be impartially constituted, there was good ground to hope that, by the wisdom of its judgments and the weight of its authority, it would command general submission, and restore Peace to Christendom. Unhappily, however, no means of assembling such a Council then existed. THE POPE, who claimed the right of summoning it, was himself the great offender, and hence any body, in the composition of which he was to have the principal share, would be far more disposed to perpetuate abuses than to remove them. The truth of this assertion is established by appealing to the actual composition of the so-called GENERAL COUNCIL OF TRENT. The leading classes of which it consisted are subjected to a rigid scrutiny, and a graphic description is given of their mode of procedure. Not only were no names of eminence to be found amongst them, but even the little judgment which they possessed they were not at liberty to exercise. Their decisions were first dictated by a set of captious wrangling Monks and Canonists, and then dispatched post-haste to Rome! The POPE and his minions made whatever changes they pleased; and the document, thus concocted and thus mutilated, on being returned to the Council, at once rose to the dignity of a Canon, "The Fathers" merely giving a mechanical nod of assent. Infallibility claimed under such circumstances was ludicrous in the extreme!

After dissecting the COUNCIL, and proving by an analysis of its constituent parts that its determinations ought to be received with suspicion, and, at all events, had no weight beyond that which their real merits might give them, CALVIN proceeds to consider the OPENING ADDRESS OF THE LEGATES; and, founding on their own confession, shows that the corruptions and abuses which existed in the Papacy, and thoroughly tainted its whole mass, more than justified those who, after endeavoring in vain to purify it, had formally withdrawn their allegiance. It is still common with Romish Writers to deny that their Church had fallen much away from the purity of early times, or been guilty of misdeeds which account for the general outcry which had been raised against her. Their theory accordingly is, that THE REFORMATION mainly had its origin in the vanity, ambition, and turbulence of a single individual, and owed its rapid progress to the rich spoils with which it tempted the avarice of its more powerful supporters. Human nature having been the same then that it is now, it were vain to deny that the motives of not a few who embraced the Reformation were of a mixed, and consequently not of the purest nature; but if any one questions the prevalence of gross iniquity in the PAPACY at the commencement of the sixteenth century, he may easily satisfy himself by merely reading the ADDRESS OF THE LEGATES. None could know the fact better than they; and corruption must have been very general and very notorious before they could venture, in a fit of candor, or feel compelled by the promptings of a burdened conscience, to color it so darkly! Well might CALVIN, taking them at their own word, contrast the impure lives of their Clergy with those of THE EARLY REFORMERS, and triumphantly ask, In which of the two bodies the marks of a true Church were most visibly displayed? Preliminary matters having been disposed of, THE CANONS themselves come under review; and that all fairness may be done, each as it is considered is first given verbatim, and then followed by a REFUTATION, or what is called its ANTIDOTE. Here CALVIN avoids minute criticism, and discarding minor points, dwells on those of primary importance. He thus obtains full scope for the comprehensive views with which his own mind was familiar; and saving his readers the tedious process of tracking out mere flaws, furnishes them with mighty weapons, by which PAPAL INFALLIBILITY, and all that has been built upon it, are easily overthrown. The fundamental points fully considered are THE RULE of FAITH, ORIGINAL SIN, JUSTIFICATION, and THE SACRIFICE AND MERITS OF CHRIST. In regard to all of these, it is clearly shown that the Heresies of the Papists are numerous and deadly. Not satisfied with THE CANON OR SCRIPTURE, as sanctioned in early times, they pronounce anathema on all who refuse to receive the APOCRYPHA as inspired, though they cannot but be aware that one of its writers, in distinct terms, disclaims inspiration. Instead of going to the original tongues for the genuine text, they insist that one version only shall be held to be authentic, and that version the VULGATE, which is here shown by CALVIN to be marred by the grossest and most ludicrous blunders. Then, even the text itself must be placed under surveillance, and he who reads must not take the meaning which the words import, how palpable soever they may be, but set it aside for any different or contradictory meaning which the Pope and his minions may be pleased to dictate! Again, in regard to ORIGINAL SIN, the doctrine of the Tridentine Canon,

though artfully endeavoring to conceal its true character, is proved to be Pelagianism under a very flimsy disguise. In the important act of JUSTIFICATON man is made to divide with his Maker, and apparently carries off the larger share. And worse than all, THE GREAT SACRIFICE which Christ offered on the cross, and then perfected once for all, is deliberately travestied; and not. only exhibited under a form in which none of its features can be recognized, but made the pretext for innumerable acts of Idolatry -- Idolatry not less gross, and far less excusable, than that which the darkest abodes of heathenism can furnish.

But it is impossible to give a full analysis of important discussions, which the author himself has compressed into the narrowest possible limits. Nor is it necessary. Enough has been said to justify the high opinion entertained of the TRACT, and satisfy those who are willing to acquaint themselves with its merits, that the perusal will not disappoint them. II. ADULTERO-GERMAN INTERIM, WITH THE REFUTATION. THE SECOND TRACT is intimately connected with the First, and has much ground in common with it. The mode of discussion, however, is different. Many topics slightly touched on in the one are fully expanded in the other; and hence, so far from superseding each other, they require to be combined in order to form a complete whole.

The preliminary part of this TRACT is an exact, copy of a celebrated document known by the name of the INTERIM, because intended by the EMPEROR CHARLES V. to regulate the interim state of religious belief, and possession of ecclesiastical property within Germany, until some more permanent arrangement could be made. The concluding, and the larger, as well as the far more interesting part of the Tract, is a Review by CALVIN, in which, in opposition to what he calls the Adultero-German Interim, he at great length, and with his usual ability, points out the TRUE METHOD OF REFORMING THE CHURCH AND HEALING HER DISSENSIONS. The device of the INTERIM was certainly chimerical in the extreme. In the circumstances in which GERMANY was placed, the attempt to regulate the possession of property merely was sufficiently difficult, because much of it not properly possessed by either party was in a kind of undetermined or transition state, and could not fail to be made the subject of competing and keenly agitated claims. CHARLES V., however, as if he had thought such considerations beneath his Imperial notice, took the far more important and extravagant step of drawing up a regular CONFESSION OF FAITH, fixing the precise limits within which the Religious Belief of the Germans would be allowed to range. This CONFESSION was drawn up by Pflug and Helding, two Roman Catholic theologians, and Agricola, a nominal Protestant, suspected of having been bribed to betray his party. In substance it contains an undisguised transcript of Popery; but endeavors to conciliate the PROTESTANTS, by allowing those of the Clergy who had been Priests and had married, to retain their wives; and conceding to their people the Communion, in both kinds. Even these privileges, like the document which granted them, were only interim! This attempt at mediation, one-sided though it was, proved almost as displeasing to the favored as to the prejudiced party. The ROMAN CATHOLICS were determined to make no concession, and nothing in their opponents could satisfy them except art unconditional surrender. The PROTESTANTS could not but feel insulted by seeing their dearest privileges peremptorily refused, and the only two which were admitted suspended on a mere peradventure. The INTERIM thus settled nothing, and in so far as it had any effect, only tended to make confusion worse confounded. In one respect, however, it gave serious alarm to many enlightened Protestants. Not a few of their adherents, unable to withstand the fiery trial to which they had for some time been exposed, were inwardly desirous of some plausible pretext which might enable them, without formally renouncing their faith, to escape from the hardships which they endured in consequence of professing it. To persons so disposed the very name of concession was sufficient; and now, on the ground that their status as Protestants was formally recognized, and that the privileges conceded would only prove the forerunners of many others, numbers seemed determined to accept of the INTERIM. Violent dissensions accordingly arose between the zealous and the lukewarm adherents of Protestantism, and the union which constituted their main strength was in danger of being broken up.

To still these troubled waves a powerful voice was required, and CALVIN again came forward. It was not, however, as a mediator. He had seen the name so often abused by the lukewarm and indifferent, for the purpose of promoting selfish views, that he almost abhorred it. His tone, therefore, was firm and resolute; and even MELANCTHON, whom he loved as a brother, fell under his rebuke. Fixing his eye on the path of duty, and determined to know no other path, he goes minutely over the controverted points, showing the impossibility of reconciling two systems so discordant as POPERY and PROTESTANTISM; and, calling upon each man to make up his mind and decide, as for eternity, concludes with a noble passage, which speaks the language and breathes the spirit of a Martyr.

III. THE SINFULNESS OF OUTWARD CONFORMITY TO ROMISH RITES.

The THIRD TRACT is in the form of an Epistle to a Friend who had sincerely embraced, the Reformed Faith, but, living under the tyranny of the Papacy, must have forfeited his life by openly professing it. The question which CALVIN is requested to answer is, How can a person so situated maintain his religious integrity? Under this question more is meant than is actually expressed; and it is impossible to read CALVIN'S reply without perceiving that the question, as he understood it, and as it was doubtless intended to be understood, was neither more nor less than this, Is it lawful for a person who has renounced Popery in his heart to conform outwardly to its Rites, for the purpose of avoiding persecution, or for any other imaginable cause? When the question is thus broadly stated, it seems impossible to hesitate for a moment to answer in the negative; and yet, for honestly giving this answer, and persisting in giving it, CALVIN incurred the displeasure of a very numerous class of so-called PROTESTANTS, and was held up to obloquy as a selfish and rigid disciplinarian, who, secure from danger in his own nook at GENEVA, would make no allowance for his brethren who were far less favorably situated, and would sooner see them suffering in the flames than yielding an outward compliance with some, absurd but harmless Rite! So loud was the outcry raised against him on this account, that CALVIN, though little disposed to defer to mere authority, when his own judgment was thoroughly convinced, not only triumphantly defended himself in several Apologetic Writings, but requested and obtained a formal confirmation of his opinion from the distinguished Theologians, PETER MARTYR, BUCER, AND MELANCTHON. It is easy to see how very desirable it must have been for those who had embraced Protestantism, but could not profess it without endangering their lives, to discover some device which might enable them, without formally renouncing their faith, to live amidst its enemies as securely as if they had renounced it; but it is certainly very difficult to imagine what that device could be, since it requires to unite in itself the impossibilities of acting honestly towards God and fraudulently towards men. Necessity, however, is ingenious; and not one merely, but a whole series of arguments were devised and strenuously insisted on, as sufficient to prove that a man thoroughly convinced of the abominations of Popery might, notwithstanding, take part openly in the observance of its Rites. One of these arguments was, that the person so complying might at the time be inwardly performing an act of pure devotion -- might, for instance, at Mass, when the host was raised, kneel to Christ seated at the right hand of his Father in heaven, while the deluded multitude around him were kneeling before the consecrated wafer. Other arguments, all necessarily of the same Jesuitical nature, were employed with the full sanction of men who called themselves Protestant Divines; and it was even thought that precedents in point might be found in the case of Naaman, who was permitted by the Prophet to accompany his master into the house of Rimmon, and the case of Paul, who tried to conciliate his countrymen by making a vow.

The whole subject, including several collateral points of importance, is here considered by CALVIN in all its bearings, in a spirit of sympathy, meekness, and candor, showing how well he could feel for those who were so unhappy as to have their homes where they could not serve God freely, and yet in a spirit of inflexible firmness, which would not allow him to sacrifice one iota of what he believed to be the truth, though it were to gain a world.

IV. PSYCHOPANNYCHIA; OR, THE SOUL'S IMAGINARY SLEEP.

The FOURTH and concluding TRACT has the somewhat singular title of PSYCHOPANNYCHIA derived from Greek words which signify "the sleep of the soul;" the object of the Tract being to show, partly from reason, but more especially from Scripture, that there is no such sleep. It was published in 1534, when CALVIN was twenty-five years of age, and is, consequently, with the exception of the Commentary on the Clementia of Seneca, published in 1532, the earliest of all his writings, and two years earlier than the Institutes, the first known edition of which appeared in 1536. It thus possesses, especially to those who delight to trace the progress of a master mind, an interest additional to that which its merit gives it.

The figment which it refutes is said by CALVIN to be of Arabian origin, but was first brought prominently into notice by some of the wildest fanatics among the ANABAPTISTS, for whom everything new and monstrous appears to have had an irresistible attraction. In more modern times, attempts have been made to give it a philosophical shape, as a necessary corollary from the dogma of Materialism advocated by Priestley and others. It would seem that the figment, wild and irrational though it is, had made considerable progress at an early period of the Reformation, and counted numerous converts, not merely among the fanatics who had revived it, but in more respectable quarters, where better things might have been expected.

One is puzzled to understand why it should have been received with so much favor; for the idea which it suggests, so far from being attractive, is naturally revolting. It was probably welcomed, not so much for its own sake, as for the great assistance which it was supposed capable of giving in THE POPISH CONTROVERSY. Were it once established that the soul falls asleep at death, and will not awake to consciousness till again united to the body at the resurrection, THE POPE would forthwith be excluded from the larger half of his domain, and deprived of the most lucrative branches of his trade! There would neither be SAINTS to whom divine honors could be paid, nor PURGATORY out of which poor souls might be delivered with more or less expedition, according to the number of well-paid masses that were said for them!

If the cordial reception given to the dogma was owing to the collateral benefit thus supposed to be derived from it, it only adds another to the many instances in which blind man would arrogantly give lessons to his Maker, and arrange the world on a better plan than His infinite wisdom has devised. Because it would furnish a triumphant refutation of Popish legends and fictions -- the soul must be made to perish with the body, and a common ruin overtake both!

It would appear that the subject had attracted attention in England, for we find that the TRACT was translated in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The title-page is as follows: --

"A Treatise of the Immortality of the Soul, by which it is proved that souls after the departure of the bodies are awake and do live: against those that think they do sleep. By JOHN CALVIN. Translated out of French by Tho. Stocker." It was "Imprinted by John Day. London, 1581."

In the PSYCHOPANNYCHIA, CALVIN, knowing the kind of people he had to deal with, accommodates himself to their capacities; and instead of entering largely into speculative disquisitions which the subject seems to suggest, and to which the metaphysical cast of his own mind must have strongly inclined him, dwells chiefly on THE SCRIPTURAL ARGUMENT -- carefully examining all the passages which the advocates of the dogma had adduced as favorable to their view, and adducing others by which it is completely overthrown. If by the adoption of this plan, the TRACT loses somewhat in point of philosophical exactness, it gains much in richness of scriptural illustration; and proves that, even at this early period, in writing his first theological publication, CALVIN gave promise of the almost unrivaled excellence to which he ultimately trained as a COMMENTATOR.

H. B.

May 1851.

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN (VOL. 4-7, Prefaces)

LETTERS 1528-1545

by John Calvin

SELECTED WORKS OF JOHN CALVIN

TRACTS AND LETTERS

EDITED BY HENRY BEVERIDGE AND JULES BONNET

VOLUME 4

LETTERS, PART 1

1528-1545

JOHN CALVIN, the profound scholar, the exact theologian, the enlightened statesman, and the eminent Reformer, exerted an influence on the age in which he lived, which, instead of being diminished by the lapse of three centuries, must continue and increase while the great truths, involving the present and future interests of mankind, which he so lucidly and energetically enforced, shall be incorporated with human enlightenment and progress. The results of his indefatigable labors, as published to the world in his Institutes, Commentaries, and Sermons, are familiar to the students of theology; but his correspondence, so illustrative of his personal character, and the history of the times in which he lived, has never, until now, been collected and made accessible to the public. The Revelation Dr. Jules Bonnet, with the approbation of the French government, has with untiring and enthusiastic ardor, explored the hidden archives, and with such gratifying success, that four volumes of Calvin's Letters are now ready for the press.

As these Letters were written in Latin and French, it was at once seen to be important that English and American readers, who most thoroughly appreciate the character of this distinguished man, should have easy access to them in their own vernacular. They have accordingly been rendered into English under the immediate inspection of Mr. Bonnet. The first two volumes were published in Edinburgh, when circumstances, unnecessary to detail, arrested the further prosecution of the work.

A benevolent gentleman in New York proposed to purchase the copyright of the Letters and transfer it to the Presbyterian Board of Publication. The arrangement has been completed, and to that Board, if we should not say to this country, is to be due the credit of first ushering to the world the rich and varied correspondence of one of the greatest and best men of the old world. The enterprise will be an expensive one, and it will require a liberal patronage. To the students of ecclesiastical history, the work will, in a certain sense, be indispensable; but every Presbyterian, who can command the means, should lend his aid to give success to the noble project. It should be mentioned, in this connection, that the truly estimable collector of the Letters, although he can never hope for any adequate pecuniary remuneration for his great labor, is exceedingly anxious that an edition of the Letters in their original form should be published in Europe, and the gratification of this hope will very much depend on the successful sale of these volumes in this country. The Presbyterian Board of Publication have been solely actuated by public considerations in their participation in the publication, and it will afford them much pleasure, if it can possibly be done, to aid Mr. Bonnet in executing his original intention.

EDITOR OF THE BOARD.

PREFACE

IT was but a few days before his death, and in the course of one of the latest conversations handed down to us by Theodore Beza, that Calvin, pointing with failing hand to his most precious furniture, his manuscripts, and the archives of the correspondence that, during a quarter of a century, he had kept up with the most illustrious personages of Europe, requested that these memorials might be carefully preserved, and that a selection from his letters, made by some of his friends, should be presented to the Reformed Churches, in token of the interest and affection of their founder. F1 This request of the dying Reformer, although treasured in the heart and memory of him who had succeeded to his plans and carried on his work, received but an imperfect fulfillment in the sixteenth century. The times were adverse, and the accomplishment of the duty was difficult. The plague, which had broken out for the third time at Geneva, and carried off thousands of victims; the great disasters, public and private; the shock of the painful events that had been occurring in France from the breaking out of the Civil War to the Massacre of St. Bartholomew; even the scruples of friendship, heightened by the perils that threatened the city of the Reformation itself, all seemed to conspire against the execution of Calvin's wish. "Without speaking," says Beza, "of the assistance that was indispensable for the examination of so extensive a correspondence, or of the time required for so laborious an undertaking, the calamities that befell our city, the plague that raged for many years, the convulsions of a neighboring country, have more than once interrupted the progress of the work. The selection of the letters also involved great difficulties, at a time when men were predisposed to judge harshly and unfairly. There are many things that may be said or written in the familiar intercourse of sincere and ingenuous friendship, such as Calvin's, which can hardly be given to the public without inconvenience. We were obliged in our work to have respect to persons, times, and places." F2 These scruples of an earnest and respectful disciple, anxious to avoid all collision with his contemporaries and at the same time to render justice to a great name, would be out of place now; but they were legitimate in an age of revolutions, when words were swords, and when the war of opinion, often sanguinary, outlasting its originators, was perpetuated in their writings.

Still it must be owned, that notwithstanding all these difficulties, the friends of Calvin did not shrink from the performance of their duty. Deeply impressed with the importance of the mission intrusted to them, they applied themselves to their task with religious fidelity. By their care, the originals or the copies of a vast number of letters addressed to France, England, Germany, and Switzerland, were collected at Geneva, and added to the precious deposit already confided to them. The archives of the city of Calvin received this treasure and preserved it faithfully through the storm that fell upon the churches of France, destroying or dispersing in foreign lands so many pages of their annals. By a remarkable dispensation, Geneva, the holy city of French Protestantism, the seminary of her ministers, of her doctors, and of her martyrs, after having conferred upon her, by the hand of Calvin, her creed and her form of worship, was also to preserve for her the titles of her origin and of her history. These titles are gloriously inscribed in the noble collection of autograph letters of the Reformer, for which we are indebted to the pious care of some refugees of the sixteenth century, whose names are almost lost in the luster of those of Calvin and Beza, but whose services cannot be forgotten without ingratitude. Let us at least recall with a fitting tribute of grateful respect, the names of Jean de Bude, Laurent de Normandie, and especially of Charles de Jonvillers.

It is to the latter mainly that we must ascribe the honor of the formation of the magnificent epistolary collection that now adorns the Library of Geneva. Born of a noble family in the neighborhood of Chartres, and carried across the Alps by the irresistible necessity of confessing the faith which he had embraced with all the ardor of youth, Charles de Jonvillers found in the affection of Calvin, a compensation for the voluntary sacrifice of fortune and country. Admitted, with his young patrician countrymen -- the elite of the Reformed party -- to the intimacy of the Reformer, he devoted himself with filial reverence and unbounded attachment to the great man whose faith and energy, moulding a rebellious people, had transformed an obscure Alpine city into a metropolis of the human mind. He became his secretary, after the celebrated lawyer, Francois Baudouin, and the minister Nicholas des Gallars, and henceforward assisted him in his laborious correspondence, followed him to the Auditoire and the Academy, and took down during Calvin's Lectures those luminous Commentaries, which were afterwards dedicated to the most illustrious personages of the age and which modern theology has never surpassed. Such was the man to whom the friendship of Calvin and the confidence of Beza assigned the great and laborious task of preparing for publication the Letters of the Reformer. He brought to it the zeal of a disciple and the filial reverence of a son who forgets himself in the execution of a sacred will; undertaking distant journeys to ensure its fulfillment, seeking everywhere for those precious documents in which were preserved the thoughts of the venerated master he had lost; and transcribing a vast number of letters with his own hand; supported in these costly and difficult researches by the consciousness of a duty accepted in humility and performed with faithfulness. This labor, early commenced and pursued for twenty years under the vigilant superintendence of Beza, was the origin of the collection of Calvin's Latin Correspondence published in 1575; a faithful but incomplete tribute to the memory of the Reformer by his disciples -- an unfinished monument, which might indeed suffice the generation that was contemporary with the Reformation, but which is insufficient to satisfy the curiosity of our own.

Nearly three centuries had passed away without adding anything to the work of Charles de Jonvillers and Beza. The Letters published by their care have been the common source from which the apologists and the adversaries of the Reformation have alike drawn; while the numerous unpublished documents preserved in the Library of Geneva, or collected in the Libraries of Zurich, Gotha, and Paris, have been forgotten. It was reserved for the present age to rescue these from unmerited oblivion, and thus to open up for history a mine of information hitherto unexplored. And here justice compels us to acknowledge, with gratitude, the obligations of this unpublished correspondence to the recent labors and investigations of several distinguished Protestant authors. We refer especially to the "Life of Calvin," by Dr. Paul Henry of Berlin, -- a pious monument raised in honor of the Reformer by a descendant of the refugees, and enriched with a number of Letters from the libraries of France and Switzerland; f5 to the learned researches of Professor Bretschneider, the editor of the Gotha Letters; f6 the important work of Ruchat, f7 re-edited by the talented continuator of the great historian Jean de Muller, Professor Vulliemin of Lausanne, with an extensive Appendix, containing precious fragments of Calvin's French Correspondence, reproduced in the "Chronicle" of M. Crottet. f8 And now, having made these acknowledgments, we may legitimately claim for ourselves the privilege of offering to the public, for the first time, a general and authentic collection of Calvin's Correspondence, the greater part of which has, up to the present time, been buried in the dust of libraries, and altogether unpublished.

This collection is the result of five years of study and research among the archives of Switzerland, France, Germany, and England. Charged by the French Government, at the suggestion of M. Mignet, under the liberal administration of two eminent ministers, MM. de Salvandy and de Falloux, with a scientific mission that enabled us to gather the first materials of a correspondence, the richest depositories of which were in foreign countries, and sustained in our labors by the cordial sympathy of those most distinguished in the world of science and literature, we have spared nothing that might ensure the completeness of a collection which throws so much light on the history of the great religious revolution of the sixteenth century.

The correspondence of Calvin begins in his youth and is only closed on his deathbed, (May 1528 to May 1564.) It thus embraces, with few intervals, all the phases of his life; from the obscure scholar of Bourges and Paris escaping from the stake by flying into exile, to the triumphant Reformer, who was able in dying, to contemplate his work as accomplished. Nothing can exceed the interest of this correspondence, in which an epoch and a life of the most absorbing interest are reflected in a series of documents equally varied and genuine; and in which the familiar effusions of friendship are mingled with the more serious questions of theology, and with the heroic breathings of faith. From his bed of suffering and of continued labors, Calvin followed with an observant eye the great drama of the Reformation, marking its triumphs and its reverses in every State of Europe. Invested, in virtue of his surpassing genius, with an almost universal apostolate, he wielded an influence as varied and as plastic as his activity. He exhorts with the same authority the humble ministers of the Gospel and the powerful monarchs of England, Sweden, and Poland. He holds communion with Luther and Melanchthon, animates Knox, encourages Coligny, Conde, Jeanne d' Albret, and the Duchess of Ferrara; while in his familiar letters to Farel, Viret, and Theodore Beza, he pours out the overflowings of a heart filled with the deepest and most acute sensibility. The same man, worn by watchings and sickness, but rising by the energy of the soul above the weakness of the body, overturns the party of the Libertines, lays the foundations of the greatness of Geneva, establishes foreign churches, strengthens the martyrs, dictates to the Protestant princes the wisest and most perspicuous counsels; negotiates, argues, teaches, prays, and with his latest breath, gives utterance to words of power, which posterity receives as the political and religious testament of the man.

These indications are sufficient to show the interest that attaches to the correspondence of the Reformer. It is the common inheritance of the countries emancipated by the Reformation and still animated by its spirit; as well as of all the Churches, however diverse in origin and varying in their confessions of faith, which manifest to the world the spiritual unity of the Church of Christ. England's portion in this precious legacy is neither the least, nor the least interesting. Observant of the great work of religious Reformation which, since the time of Wicliff, had been going on in that country, and which was destined to have the singular privilege of placing the civil and political liberties of the nation in the glorious keeping of the Gospel, Calvin condemned with great severity the spiritual tyranny of Henry the Eighth, and the endeavors of that prince to substitute a sanguinary imperial popedom for that of Rome. During the reign of his successor, he exercises a marked influence in the councils of the crown, and traces with vigorous hand, for the Duke of Somerset, a plan of religious reformation in which the conservative spirit is happily blended with the liberal and progressive tendency. He addresses the young King Edward VI., so prematurely withdrawn from the love of his subjects, in a strain of exhortation dictated by paternal solicitude and respectful affection: -- "It is a great thing to be a king, and especially of such a country; and yet I doubt not that you regard it as above all comparison greater to be a Christian. It is, indeed, an inestimable privilege that God has granted to you, Sire, that you should be a Christian King, and that you should serve him as his lieutenant to uphold the kingdom of Jesus Christ in England." f9 -- The death of this young King, so well fitted to carry out the designs of Providence for his people, and the restoration of Popery under Mary, heavily afflicted Calvin. He rejoices in the accession of Elizabeth, freely exhorts her ministers, and his advice, dictated by a wisdom and prescience to which time has set its seal, furnishes the most remarkable proof of the faith and the genius of the Reformer.

Having pointed out the historical value of this correspondence, it may not be out of place to refer to its literary merit. Trained in the twofold school of profane and sacred Antiquity, of the Church and of the world, Calvin's Latin is that of a contemporary of Cicero or of Seneca, whose graceful and concise style he reproduces without effort. He writes in French as one of the creators of that language, which is indebted to him for some of its finest characteristics. Writing before Montaigne, he may be regarded as the precursor and the model of that great school of the seventeenth century which could only fight him with weapons from his own armoury, and which could not surpass him either in loftiness of thought or in stately majesty of style. The French letters of Calvin, worthy of the author of the immortal preface to the "Christian Institutes," contain many admirable passages hitherto unknown, and are models of eloquence: they will be found in this Collection interspersed with the Latin Correspondence from which they were detached in the original Paris edition, and will present, in chronological order, a series of moral and religious studies -- a genuine portrait of the Reformer drawn by his own hand, in the original documents, which we now, for the first time, present to the historian. The seasonableness of such a publication cannot be denied. The great debate ever pending between the Papacy and the Reformation is renewed in our days with fresh vigor in almost all the countries of Europe. Attack provokes defense; and in the strife of opinion, the rights of justice and of truth are too frequently disregarded. While some rare spirits, enlightened by the study of history, or the attentive observation of the effect of the dogmas of either religion on the moral conduct of its votaries, rise superior to the mists of prejudice and form a judgment which is moulding that of posterity, f10 the adepts of a school, unhappily celebrated as the admirers of excesses which the sincere disciples of Christianity or of philosophy have alike reproved, have nought but malediction and insult for the glorious Revolution stamped by the names of Luther and of Calvin. Never, perhaps, were detraction and outrage let loose with such fury against these great deliverers of conscience; never have their intentions been so audaciously misrepresented, their actions so grossly caricatured. f11 To the falsehoods of a party that shrinks not from slander, let us oppose the impartial evidence of history; let us learn from these great men themselves what they desired, what they did, what they suffered; and let us seek from them alone the secret of the Revolution which they achieved. The Correspondence of Calvin will, we believe, throw a fresh light upon those grave questions which Modern Science, worthy of the name, now proposes to herself with a desire for impartial justice which does her honor. It is by this sentiment that we may venture to say we have been animated, in the course of the long researches which have enabled us to offer this collection to the public. Guided solely by the love of truth, and shrinking from no revelation that was guarantied by authentic documents, we have rejected no sources of information, nor omitted any evidence. Our ambition has been to make Calvin live again in his letters -- to shew him as he was, with his austere and inflexible convictions, which yet were far from intolerant, in the intercourse of friendship and the freedom of the domestic circle -- with that stern self-sacrifice of his life to duty which alone explains its power and excuses its errors -- with the failings which were the heritage of his times and those which were peculiar to himself. History, interrogated in original documents, is not a panegyric; it throws no veil over the shortcomings of its heroes, but it remembers that they are men, and draws lessons alike from their infirmities and from their greatness.

We cannot close this Preface without offering the tribute of our sincere gratitude to those friends in England and on the Continent whose kind encouragement has favored the publication. And we would address our first acknowledgments to the Librarians of the Continental Libraries, who eagerly placed at our disposal the whole MS. collections committed to their charge. We have pleasure in paying the same tribute to one of the most distinguished citizens of Geneva, Colonel Henri Tronchin, who so liberally opened to us the precious documents that have been transmitted to him through a series of illustrious ancestors; and we regard it as a peculiar privilege to record our obligations, while at Geneva, to the encouraging kindness of two men eminent in her sacred literature, M. le Pasteur Gaussen, and to the learned historian of the Reformation, M. le Docteur Merle d'Aubigne, whose patronage, which was given as a matter of course to the publication of Calvin's Correspondence, has been the means of attracting to us valuable sympathies in the United States, in England, and in that noble country of Scotland, where the name of Calvin, gloriously associated with that of Knox, receives an honorable tribute in the labors of a Society devoted to the translation, of his writings. It is with heartfelt satisfaction that we inscribe on the first page of the collection, and recall in one grateful thought, the names of the three generous patrons of the undertaking, Mr. Douglas of Cavers, Mr. Henderson of Park, and Mr. James Lenox of New York.

Our personal thanks we may surely be permitted to offer to the translator of the work. Nothing could exceed the difficulty of rendering Calvin's letters in English, and of harmonizing the antique style of the originals with the structure of a modern language. We believe that this difficulty has been happily overcome by the translator, who has devoted himself with persevering ardor, and with a sort of filial piety, to a work requiring so great an amount of patience and of learning. If, through the transparent mirror of a scrupulously faithful translation, the reader is enabled to follow the grave religious beauty of the originals, -- if he is brought, as it were, into communion with the soul of Calvin himself, in the fine and varied effusions of his correspondence, he will be indebted for this privilege to the labor of Mr. Constable, revised by the Revelation Dr. Cunningham, Principal of the New College, Edinburgh, with a degree of watchful care and enlightened solicitude that cannot be too highly appreciated. (Mr. Constable translated only the first two volumes, which were published in Edinburgh. -- EDITOR OF THE BOARD.)

And thus the wish expressed by Calvin on his deathbed, and forgotten during three centuries, is now realized for Britain as well as for France. His memory loses nothing from these tardy revelations, and the only testimony worthy of him is that of truth. This is the testimony that appears in every page of his correspondence. In so far as we have been his faithful interpreters we are happy if, according to the measure of our poor ability, we have been permitted, not to glorify a man, but to glorify God himself, in the life of one of his chosen instruments for the accomplishment of one of the noblest acts in the providential drama of history.

The English edition of Calvin's collected Correspondence will form four volumes similar to the present, and will contain at least 600 letters, the greater part of which are now published for the first time. An appendix at the end of the work will give, in chronological order, and with a summary of their contents, a list of those letters which it has been thought unnecessary to include in this edition, but which those who may desire to do so, will have an opportunity of consulting in the complete edition of the originals, in course of publication in Paris.

This seven volume set by John Calvin is available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 5 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALVIN, JOHN

Catechism of the Church of Geneva, Instruction for Children in the Doctrine of Christ

First published in French in 1536, and in Latin in 1538, it was later revised by Calvin himself, demonstrating the importance which Calvin attached to this vital work. This celebrated catechism, presented here in the English version, is unquestionably superior to all which previously existed and the best of those which have since appeared owe much of their excellence to the free use of its contents. It is made up of five heads: Faith, Law, Prayer, the Word of God, and the Sacraments.

The translator's preface notes:

The practice of catechising, which had early been established in the Church, and is indeed of such antiquity that some think they can trace an allusion to it in the first verse of St. Luke's Gospel, in which the word for 'instructed' might have been rendered 'catechised,' had before the Reformation fallen into such neglect, that according to Calvin, it was either altogether omitted, or, when in use, was only employed in teaching and thereby perpetuating absurd and puerile superstitions. One of the first and most laudable efforts of the Reformers was to revive the practice, and restore it to its pristine vigour and purity.

Moreover, Christian History magazine (Vol. 5, No. 4, p. 3 [this whole issue is devoted to John Calvin]) reports,

that this Catechism enabled the pastor to teach the basics of the Reformed faith by means of questions and answers spread over 55 Sundays. Memorized by children at school, repeated and explained before the whole community on Sunday, it became a key element in the formation of the faith of Genevans and other Reformed believers for nearly two centuries.

 

Furthermore, as the translator notes, "[t]he Protestant church of France, after a full discussion in its Synods, came to the resolution of adopting Calvin's Catechism unchanged." God-honoring results can be obtained once again, in our day, by resurrecting this ancient and biblical teaching method.

 

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This book is also available on all 30 Reformation Bookshelf CDs (in the "FREE BOOKS" file) at http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm (along with 100 other free books and articles on each CD!).


CALVIN, JOHN

Come Out From Among Them: The "Anti-Nicodemite" Writings of John Calvin

Much of Calvin's best work still lays buried in languages other than English (as Eire's book War Against The Idols: The Reformation of Worship from Erasmus to Calvin [ http://www.swrb.com/catalog/E.htm ] testifies). This will no longer be the case with these fine sermons and writings, of which most are now translated, for the first time ever, into English!

Calvin placed the central emphasis of the Reformation not on the doctrine of salvation alone, but equally upon the foundation of biblically-regulated worship. The works contained in this newly compiled edition find Calvin at his "ballistic" best as he refutes and rebukes all those who would undermine the Reformation, by compromising the truth of Christ, in their outward attendance among those who practice idolatrous acts of "worship" (i.e. those referred to as the "Nicodemites").

Here we find Calvin calling for separation from all churches which embrace idolatrous worship. He takes the bold and Biblical stand that only the most seriously committed Reformers ever understood (like Knox), even proclaiming that it is better to worship privately in your home than to engage in dissimulation by participating in ordinances of worship which are known to be false. For Calvin clearly taught,

When the spiritual government doth degenerate, the consciences of the godly are at liberty, and set free from obeying unjust authority; especially if the wicked and profane enemies of holiness do falsely pretend the title of priesthood (i.e. clergy--OC) to overthrow the doctrine of salvation (as do Arminians, Neonomians, Antinomians, Dispensationalists, etc.--OC), and challenge to themselves such authority, as that they will be thereby equal with God (i.e. making the law of God void through human traditions; e.g. humanly composed hymns, instrumental music, choirs, holy-days, etc.--OC)" (Calvin as cited in The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness magazine).

"Some one will therefore ask me what counsel I would like to give to a believer who thus dwells in some Egypt or Babylon where he may not worship God purely, but is forced by the common practice to accommodate himself to bad things. The first advice would be to leave [i.e. relocate--GB] if he could. . . . If someone has no way to depart, I would counsel him to consider whether it would be possible for him to abstain from all idolatry in order to preserve himself pure and spotless toward God in both body and soul. ***Then let him worship God in private*** (in his home--RB), praying him to restore his poor church to its right estate (John Calvin, Come Out From Among Them, The Anti-Nicodemite Writings of John Calvin, Protestant Heritage Press, "A Short Treatise," pp. 93-94, emphases added. Come Out From Among Them is also on the new PHP CD at http://www.swrb.com/newslett/FREEBOOK/KReed.htm).

As Calvin's words once again thunder down the corridors of the centuries, in the common language of the people, they will certainly ring true in the ears of those who hear the Master's voice, providing a firm foundation for future Reformation(s). This title also contains another excellent "Publishers Introduction" by Kevin Reed, which we believe is worth the price of the book on its own. Combined with Calvin's work (which is easily worth its weight in gold), this is a must read for serious modern Reformers.

Come Out From Among Them: The "Anti-Nicodemite" Writings of John Calvin is also now available for the first time ever in English on the new Presbyterian Heritage Publications CD, with many other classic Reformation works (for $98.98 US funds). Summaries and a full list of titles contained on the PHP CD are listed at http://www.swrb.com/catalog/R.htm under "REED, KEVIN."

 

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FREE AUDIO MP3 SERMONS by JOHN CALVIN!

To hear FREE audio (MP3) sermons from JohnCalvin, as contained in this important recently translated book, Come Out From Among Them: The "Anti-Nicodemite" Writings of John Calvin, please go to:

Separation From False Worship, Idolatry & Popish Principles
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=8320101619

Suffering Outside the Camp
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=7210112851

Seeking the Lord's Face
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=8130112743

The Importance of Outward Means of Grace
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=7290123154


CALVIN ON SEPARATION FROM FALSE WORSHIP (i.e. worship not based on the second commandment or what is now called the regulative principle of worship) AND WORSHIPPING PRIVATELY (IN YOUR HOME)

"Some one will therefore ask me what counsel I would like to give to a believer who thus dwells in some Egypt or Babylon where he may not worship God purely, but is forced by the common practice to accommodate himself to bad things. The first advice would be to leave [i.e. relocate--GB] if he could. . . . If someone has no way to depart, I would counsel him to consider whether it would be possible for him to abstain from all idolatry in order to preserve himself pure and spotless toward God in both body and soul. ***Then let him worship God in private*** (in his home--RB), praying him to restore his poor church to its right estate (John Calvin, Come Out From Among Them, The Anti-Nicodemite Writings of John Calvin, Protestant Heritage Press, "A Short Treatise," pp. 93-94, emphases added. Come Out From Among Them is also on the new PHP CD at http://www.swrb.com/newslett/FREEBOOK/KReed.htm).

Calvin quote (above) cited in: Appendix G in The Covenanted Reformation Defended by Greg Barrow (http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/append_g.htm), "A brief examination of Mr. Bacon's principles regarding the visible church and the use of private judgment. Also, some observations regarding his ignoble attack upon Kevin Reed in his book entitled The Visible Church in the Outer Darkness."

Romans 16:17 is also very clear on this point:

"Now I beseech you, brethren, mark them which cause divisions and offences contrary to the (Apostolic--RB) doctrine which ye have learned; and avoid them."


CALVIN, JOHN

Comparison Between the False Church and the True
This is the famous ecclesiastical section of Calvin's Institutes
(Book 4, Chapter 2, Beveridge edition), so often referred to in debates concerning the nature of the visible church. It includes, in section 12, the indispensable distinction made by Calvin regarding the two ways in which the church is visible (i.e. as seen in those professing the truth [with their children] and also as corporately constituted). Calvin here recognizes the visible church at Rome in that the elect are present at Rome, but goes on to call for separation from Rome in that she, as a corporate entity (being a harlot and not Christ's chaste bride), is not duly (or lawfully) constituted. The Battles edition of the Institutes (section twelve in this chapter, "The sound elements do not make the corrupted church a true church"), beautifully translates Calvin's summary of this Scripturally faithful argument,

However, when we categorically deny to the papists the title of the church, we do not for this reason impugn the existence of churches among them. Rather, we are only contending about the true and lawful constitution of the church, required in the communion not only of the sacraments (which are the signs of profession) but also especially of doctrine. Daniel [Dan. 9:27] and Paul [II Thess. 2:4] foretold that Antichrist would sit in the Temple of God. With us, it is the Roman pontiff we make the leader and standard bearer of that wicked and abominable kingdom. The fact that his seat is placed in the Temple of God signifies that his reign was not to be such as to wipe out either the name of Christ or of the church. From this it therefore is evident that we by no means deny that the churches under his tyranny remain churches. But these he has profaned by his sacrilegious impiety, afflicted by his inhuman domination, corrupted and well-nigh killed by his evil and deadly doctrines, which are like poisoned drinks. In them Christ lies hidden, half buried, the gospel overthrown, piety scattered, the worship of God nearly wiped out. In them, briefly, everything is so confused that there we see the face of Babylon rather than that of the Holy City of God. To sum up, I call them churches to the extent that the Lord wonderfully preserves in them a remnant of his people, however woefully dispersed and scattered, and to the extent that some marks of the church remain--especially those marks whose effectiveness neither the devil's wiles nor human depravity can destroy (note: this is why the Reformers accepted Roman Catholic baptisms as valid, though not lawful--RB). But on the other hand, because in them those marks have been erased to which we should pay particular regard in this discourse, I say that every one of their congregations and their whole body lack the lawful form of the church (emphasis added).

Without the understanding of Calvin's (and the bulk of other major Reformers) ecclesiology on this point, it is impossible to fully appreciate the Reformer's position regarding separation, schism, the sacraments, the ministry, eschatology, etc. Don't miss this important work!
(Rare bound photocopy) $8.95-60%=$3.58 (US funds)

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This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 23 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CALVIN, JOHN

Defending the Reformation: John Calvin Debates the Romanist Sadolet
Includes both Cardinal Sadolet's letter to the senate and people of Geneva (in which he endeavors to bring the city back to allegiance to the Roman antichrist) and Calvin's reply to this letter. After declining to dispense the Lord's Supper (because of the "unchristian spirit which prevailed in Geneva" [Beveridge]) Calvin, Conrad and Farel were banished from the city. Rome, wanting to make the most of this opportunity, called upon one of her most accomplished scholars, Sadolet, to write the Genevese. Calvin did not hesitate to reply. "The reply, besides containing a triumphant vindication of the Reformed doctrine -- a vindication so triumphant that Sadolet is said to have forthwith given up the affair as desperate, is written in a spirit of meekness and candour," notes Beveridge. Hitting the main controversies of the Reformation (including the authority of Scripture [and the church], justification by faith alone, worship, unity and schism) Calvin's letter is a masterful defence of first Reformation thought. This item is also available in Calvin's Selected Works
, volume 1.
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This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 17 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CALVIN, JOHN

Head Coverings and Women
This rare item contains the collected wisdom of some of the Reformed Faith's leading forefathers including John Calvin, Matthew Henry, Thomas Manton, John Murray, B.B. Warfield, and many others.
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RELATED TITLE:

Reformed Presbytery in North America (RPNA)

The Practice of Headcoverings in Public Worship (June, 2001)

 

Demonstrates from Scripture and classic Protestant interpretation (from John Calvin [and covenanted Geneva], the Geneva Bible [ http://www.swrb.com/bibles/bibles.htm ], Theodore Beza, the Westminster Divines [including Samuel Rutherford and George Gillespie], the Covenanted General Assemblies of Scotland and their lower courts, Francis Turretin, the Augsburg Confession [1530], the Reformed Churches of France [1579], The Dutch Annotations Upon the Whole Bible [1637, commissioned by the Synod of Dort, 1618, et al.]) that headcoverings are an alterable cultural sign. Also deals with similar signs such as "greeting one another with a holy kiss" and foot washing.

 

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CALVIN, JOHN, JOHN OWEN et al.

Instrumental Music in the Worship of God

Quotes from Calvin, Edwards, Owen, Rutherford, and numerous others citing and expounding on the old Reformed position. Instrumental music in public worship was a regulated circumstance of Old Covenant worship and thus Calvin writes, "From this it appears that the Papists, as I shall have occasion to show elsewhere, in employing instrumental music cannot be said so much to imitate the practice of God's ancient people as to ape it in a sense less and absurd manner, exhibiting a silly delight in that worship of the Old Testament which was figurative and terminated with the gospel." You may be shocked to see the strong and unanimous testimony, given by these famous and much respected Reformers, against the use of musical instruments in public worship of the one true and living God.

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CALVIN, JOHN

Institutes of the Christian Religion (Very Rare 1634 Thomas Norton Translation)

This edition of Calvin's Institutes is the very rare 1634 Thomas Norton (Thomas Cranmer's son-in-law) translation, which sells for about $4,000 on the rare book market. It was also the first English translation of the Institutes to appear in modern type.

In the foreword to the book Theological Guide to Calvin's Institutes, J.I. Packer (SWRB does not support Packer's skewed theological views) writes:

"The readability of the Institutio, considering its size, is remarkable. Calvin’s pacing is steady and urgent throughout. Just about every sentence contains concentrated thought expressed in elegant, fast-moving, colorful, punchy Latin rhetoric. (No English translation fully matches Calvin’s Latin; that of the Elizabethan, Thomas Norton, perhaps gets closest; Beveridge gives us Calvin’s feistiness but not always his precision; Battles gives us the precision but not always the punchiness, and fleetness of foot; Allen is smooth and clear, but low-key.)"

It would not be an exaggeration to say that Calvin's Institutes would be among the ten most influential writings in the history of the world. It is hard for us to imagine how far Calvin had come in his time, and, if you know the thought of his day, how much he has influenced our world. "Perhaps no other theological work has so consistently retained for four centuries a place on the reading list of studious Christians... Wherever in the crises of history social foundations are shaken and men's hearts quail, the pages of this classic are searched with fresh respect," notes the introduction to the Beveridge edition.

Calvin's Institutes perhaps show more clearly than any other work by Calvin why John Knox called Geneva "the most perfect school of Christ that was ever on earth since the days of the apostles."

The Norton translation of Calvin's Institutes is also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 5 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm

Contents of John Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion:

- BOOK I. THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD THE CREATOR.

    1. The Knowledge of God and That of Ourselves Are Connected. How They are Interrelated.

    2. What it is to Know God, and to What Purpose the Knowledge of Him Tends.

    3. The Knowledge of God Has Been Naturally Implanted in the Minds of Men.

    4. This Knowledge is Either Smothered of Corrupted, Partly by Ignorance, Partly by Malice.

    5. The Knowledge of God Shines Forth in the Fashioning of the Universe and the Continuing Government of It.

    6. Scripture is Needed as Guide and Teacher for Anyone Who Would Come to God the Creator.

    7. Scripture Must Be Confirmed by the Witness of the Spirit. Thus May Its Authority Be Established as Certain; and It is a Wicked Falsehood that Its Credibility Depends on the Judgment of the Church.

    8. So Far as Human Reason Goes, Sufficiently Firm Proofs Are At Hand to Establish the Credibility of Scripture.

    9. Fanatics, Abandoning Scripture and Flying Over to Revelation, Cast Down All the Principles of Godliness.

   10. Scripture, to Correct All Superstition, Has Set the True God Alone Over Against All the Gods of the Heathen.

   11. It is Unlawful to Attribute a Visible Form to God, and Generally Whoever Sets Up Idols Revolts Against the True God.

   12. How God Is to Be So Distinguished from Idols that Perfect Honor May Be Given to Him Alone.

   13. In Scripture, from the Creation Onward, We Are Taught One Essence of God, Which Contains Three Persons.

   14. Even in the Creation of the Universe and of All Things, Scripture by Unmistakable Marks Distinguishes the True God from False Gods.

   15. Discussion of Human Nature as Created, of the Faculties of the Soul, of the Image of God, of Free Will, and of the Original Integrity of Man's Nature.

   16. God by His Power Nourishes and Maintains the World Created by Him, and Rules Its Several Parts by His Providence.

   17. How We May Apply This Doctrine to Our Greatest Benefit.

   18. God So Uses the Works of the Ungodly, and So Bends Their Minds to Carry Out His Judgments, that He Remains Pure from Every Stain.

- BOOK II. THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD THE REDEEMER IN CHRIST, FIRST DISCLOSED TO THE FATHERS UNDER THE LAW, AND THEN TO US IN THE GOSPEL.

    1. By the Fall and Revolt of Adam the Whole Human Race Was Delivered to the Curse, and Degenerated from Its Original Condition; the Doctrine of Original Sin.

    2. Man Has Now Been Deprived of Freedom of Choice and Bound Over to Miserable Servitude.

    3. Only Damnable Things Come Forth from Man's Corrupt Nature.

    4. How God Works in Men's Hearts.

    5. Refutation of the Objections Commonly Put Forward in Defense of Free Will.

    6. Fallen Man Ought to Seek Redemption in Christ.

    7. The Law Was Given, Not to Restrain the Folk of the Old Covenant Under Itself, but to Foster Hope of Salvation in Christ Until His Coming.

    8. Explanation of the Moral Law (the Ten Commandments).

    9. Christ, Although He Was Known to the Jews Under the Law, Was at Length Clearly Revealed Only in the Gospel.

   10. The Similarity of the Old and New Testaments.

   11. The Difference Between the Two Testaments.

   12. Christ Had to Become Man in Order to Fulfill the Office of Mediator.

   13. Christ Assumed the True Substance of Human Flesh.

   14. How the Two Natures of the Mediator Make One Person.

   15. To Know the Purpose for Which Christ Was Sent by the Father, and What He Conferred Upon Us, We Must Look Above All at Three Things in Him: the Prophetic Office, Kingship, and Priesthood.

   16. How Christ Has Fulfilled the Function of Redeemer to Acquire Salvation for Us. Here, Also, His Death and Resurrection Are Discussed, as Well as His Ascent Into Heaven.

   17. Christ Rightly and Properly Said to Have Merited God's Grace and Salvation for Us.

- BOOK III. THE WAY IN WHICH WE RECEIVE THE GRACE OF CHRIST: WHAT BENEFITS COME TO US FROM IT, AND WHAT EFFECTS FOLLOW.

    1. The Things Spoken Concerning Christ Profit Us by the Secret Working of the Spirit.

    2. Faith: Its Definition Set Forth, and Its Properties Explained.

    3. Our Regeneration by Faith: Repentance.

    4. How Far from the Purity of the Gospel Is All That the Sophists in Their Schools Prate About Repentance; Discussion of Confession and Satisfaction.

    5. The Supplements That They Add to Satisfactions, Namely, Indulgences and Purgatory.

    6. The Life of the Christian Man; and First, by What Arguments Scripture Urges Us to It.

    7. The Sum of the Christian Life: The Denial of Ourselves.

    8. Bearing the Cross, a Part of Self-denial.

    9. Meditation on the Future Life.

   10. How We Must Use the Present Life and Its Helps.

   11. Justification by Faith: First the Definition of the Word and of the Matter.

   12. We Must Lift Up Our Minds to God's Judgment Seat that We May Be Firmly Convinced of His Free Justification.

   13. Two Things to Be Noted in Free Justification.

   14. The Beginning of Justification and Its Continual Progress.

   15. Boasting About the Merits of Works Destroys Our Praise of God for Having Bestowed Righteousness, as Well as Our Assurance of Salvation.

   16. Refutation of the False Accusations by Which the Papists Try to Cast Odium Upon This Doctrine.

   17. The Agreement of the Promises of the Law and of the Gospel.

   18. Works Righteousness Is Wrongly Inferred from Reward.

   19. Christian Freedom.

   20. Prayer, Which is the Chief Exercise of Faith, and by Which We Daily Receive God's Benefits.

   21. Eternal Election, by Which God Has Predestined Some to Salvation, Others to Destruction.

   22. Confirmation of This Doctrine from Scriptural Testimonies.

   23. Refutation of the False Accusations with Which This Doctrine Has Always Been Unjustly Burdened.

   24. Election Is Confirmed by God's Call; Moreover, the Wicked Bring Upon Themselves the Just Destruction to Which They Are Destined.

   25. The Final Resurrection.

- BOOK IV. THE EXTERNAL MEANS OR AIDS BY WHICH GOD INVITES US INTO THE SOCIETY OF CHRIST AND HOLDS US THEREIN.

    1. Of the true Church. Duty of cultivating unity with her, as the mother of all the godly.

    2. Comparison between the false church and the true.

    3. Of the teachers and ministers of the Church. Their election and office.

    4. Of the state of the primitive Church, and the mode of government in use before the papacy.

    5. The ancient form of government utterly corrupted by the tyranny of the papacy.

    6. Of the primacy of the Romish see.

    7. Of the beginning and rise of the Romish papacy till it attained a height by which the liberty of the church was destroyed, and all true rule overthrown.

    8. Of the power of the church in articles of faith. The unbridled license of the papal church in destroying purity of doctrine.

    9. Of councils and their authority.

   10. Of the power of making laws. The cruelty of the pope and his adherents, in this respect, in tyrannically oppressing and destroying souls.

   11. Of the jurisdiction of the church and the abuses of it, as exemplified in the papacy.

   12. Of the discipline of the Church, and its principal use in censures and excommunication.

   13. Of vows. The miserable entanglements caused by vowing rashly.

   14. Of the sacraments.

   15. Of Baptism.

   16. Paedobaptism. Its accordance with the institution of Christ, and the nature of the sign.

   17. Of the Lord's Supper, and the benefits conferred by it.

   18. Of the Popish mass. How it not only profanes, but annihilates the Lord's Supper.

   19. Of the five sacraments, falsely so called. Their spuriousness proved, and their true character explained.

   20. Of civil government.

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The Norton translation of Calvin's Institutes is also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 5 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm

FREE MP3s of Calvin's Institutes (Beveridge edition) begin at
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RECOMMENDED MP3s: Institutes of the Christian Religion #12 (Free Will Refuted and How God Works in the Hearts of Men Regarding Salvation, Sanctification & Reprobation) by John Calvin at http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=121506153210

John Calvin's book The Institutes of the Christian Religion (Beveridge edition) is free in text at http://www.reformed.org/books/institutes/index.html

 


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CALVIN, JOHN

Instruction In Faith (1537)
This translation of a very enlightening book includes all the essentials of Calvin's position, unobscured by the complicated discussions characteristic of Calvin's later writings. "Fuhrmann correctly observes... that this early work of Calvin exhibits the living faith of Christianity in all its simplicity and grandeur.'... It presents in simplified form what came to be known as the basic doctrines of the Reformed branch of Protestantism" (Keesecker, back cover).
(Softcover) $14.95 - 20% = 11.96

CALVIN, JOHN

Inventory of Relics
The Pope at the time of Calvin's death, Pious IV, once said "[t]he strength of that heretic [Calvin] consisted in this, that money never had the slightest charm for him. If I had such servants my dominion would extend from sea to sea" (Christian History magazine, Vol. 5, No. 4, p. 2). Certainly a pertinent comment, as in this book Calvin exposes Romish image and relic worship as heathen idolatry, striking at the senseless superstition of Romish folly which, as here, is often based more on filling their coffers than even making an attempt at appearing to follow Scripture or obey Christ.
(Rare bound photocopy) $4.99 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 15 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALVIN, JOHN

Letters of John Calvin
"Calvin wrote to kings and princes, Reformers and friends, nobility and common people alike. His letters reveal a man of deep pastoral concern, consistent and exemplary evangelistic zeal, with a humble sense of the final authority of God and his Word" (Banner of Truth catalogue).
(Softcover) $19.95-20%=15.96

CALVIN, JOHN

The Mystery of Godliness and Other Sermons
"When we consider the mental darkness which enveloped the world in the days of Calvin, under Popish superstition and idolatry, and that he was one of the first who attempted to emancipate the human intellect from the darkness that kept men in the servile yoke of Papistry to bring them into the liberty of the gospel," the hearer cannot but appreciate these selected sermons of John Calvin, minister of the gospel and one of the principle leaders in the Protestant Reformation (AWPT).
 (Hardcover) $34.95-20%=$27.95 (US funds)


CALVIN, JOHN

Necessity of Reforming the Church (1544)

C.H. Spurgeon once said, "[t]he longer I live the clearer does it appear that John Calvin's system is the nearest to perfection." (cited in Christian History magazine, Vol. 5, No. 4). Ironically, Credenda Agenda (a magazine that denounces those who uphold what Calvin teaches about worship in this book) reviewed this work stating,

"...the relevance of Calvin's book today is exceptional. Apart from the grace of God, the human heart never changes. Men have always loved external religion, and unless God saves them, they always will. But God demands heart religion... His writing is relevant because the church today is in dire need of a similar reformation and revival. Like Calvin, some few believers today see 'the present condition of the Church... to be very miserable, and almost desperate.' Our context is different in one key respect however. The church needing reformation in Calvin's day was the tradition-encrusted church of Rome. Shortly after the Reformation, for those leaving Rome behind, two streams became apparent. One was the stream of classical Protestant orthodoxy, represented today by a handful of Gideons in their desktop publishing winevats. The other was the left wing of the Reformation -- the anabaptist movement. In the early years, the anabaptists were suffering outsiders. But today the anabaptist church is the Establishment -- an establishment governed by a chaos of traditions instead of biblical worship. Everywhere we look we see Christians approaching God with observances in worship which Calvin calls 'the random offspring of their own brain' (which was Calvin's way of rebuking those who reject the regulative principle of worship; which ironically, the writers of this very statement [Credenda Agenda] do--RB)."

Though this work is not an elaborate systematic presentation of the foundations of Christianity, such as Calvin's Institutes, it has still been correctly acknowledged as one of the most important documents of the Reformation. Calvin here pleads the cause dearest to his heart before an assembly perhaps the most august that Europe could have furnished in that day. It has been said that the animated style used by Calvin in this work would not lose by comparison with any thing in the celebrated "Dedication" prefixed to his Institutes. To this day, The Necessity of Reforming the Church remains a powerful weapon, both defensive and offensive, to fight the contemporary battle for true doctrine, faithful (or biblically regulated) worship and Scriptural church government. Here, in one of Calvin's classic works, we find the answers to many of the vexing questions which continue to agitate the Church in our day -- over four and a half centuries after this great Reformer first penned these words. 114 pages.

 

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This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 24 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALVIN, JOHN
The Rise of the Papacy with Proof from Daniel and Paul that the Pope is Antichrist

This is Book 4, Chapter 7 out of the Beveridge edition of Calvin's Institutes. It shows how "the Papacy appeared complete in all its parts, the seat of Antichrist." Rome's impiety, execrable tyranny, and wickedness is also clearly portrayed, in a most pointed manner, by the pen of the great Reformer.

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CALVIN, JOHN, THE WESTMINSTER DIVINES & OTHERS

Selected Writings on Justification by Faith and the Free Offer of the Gospel for the Succor and Comfort of the Troubled Saint, and the Convicted Sinner

Includes writings by John Calvin, the Westminster Divines, Robert Traill, the Reformed Presbytery, William Guthrie, and pertinent articles from the Original Covenanter and Contending Witness magazine defending the Protestant view of justification and the preaching of the Gospel. Compiled by Lary Birger. 90 pages.

 

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CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on the Deity of Christ (1581, translated 1950, 1997)
"Twenty Christological sermons are found in this volume covering the Divinity, Humanity, Nativity, Passion, Death, Resurrection, Ascension and Return of our Lord Jesus Christ. Originally published 400 years ago, these sermons were translated afresh from the French and Latin by Levoy Nixon this century. This Old Paths Publications' edition is from the second translation. In his epistle to the reader in the original translation the translator of these sermons, Thomas Stocker, set down for us the relevance and application of these sermons to his day where in place of faithful exposition, there existed false doctrine, and 'vain and doltish tales.' Faithful church government was replaced by the establishment of tyranny where men would 'vomit and cast up arrogant and proud speeches in the pulpit against the children of God, and against all such as Jesus Christ hath revealed himself unto.' That we find such in our day as well, without question, establishes the need for this reprint" (back cover). 302 pages.
(Hardcover) $59.95-34%=39.58

CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on Election and Reprobation (1579, 1996)
It has been over 400 years since John Calvin's 13 Sermons Entreating of the Free Election of God in Jacob, and of Reprobation in Esau (A Treatise Wherein Every Christian May See the Excellent Benefits of God Towards His Children, and His Marvellous Judgements Towards the Reprobate...--RB)
were published in a collected edition. Old Paths Publications has prepared a newly typeset edition from the 1579 printing of the English translation by John Field in its entirety... There is also an index of Scriptures referred to by Calvin, and an extensive subject index. This work deals with an awesome topic that has throughout time been repeatedly misunderstood, unfairly ignored, but most often shamefully denied and taught against. Calvin will cause the reader of these sermons to rightly understand this profound doctrine, to come away with the biblical truth of the sovereignty of the Creator, and to understand that God is God and needs not man to excuse or explain away the power of the Potter over the clay -- as He makes to dishonor the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction" (Old Paths Publications' flyer). The only drawback to this otherwise fine publication is that it is marred by the inclusion of a foreword by David Engelsma, a man that denies the free offer of the gospel -- which Calvin clearly taught (cf. Calvin on the Free Offer of the Gospel [$2.78, bound photocopy]). 400 pages.
(Hardcover) $59.95-34%=39.58 (US funds)

FREE MP3 audio sermon from the above book: http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=1030054213

CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on Galatians
It has been over 400 years since Calvin's 43 sermons on Galatians were published in a collected edition. Old Paths Publications has prepared a newly typeset edition from the 1574 printing of the English translation by Arthur Golding in its entirety. This massive volume (of almost 1000 pages) is the complete and unabridged work of Calvin on Galatians, not to be confused with his commentary. An original copy is so rare that antiquarian booksellers price them at $1000. The sermons have been edited to reflect contemporary spelling, and bracketed words in italics are inserted following some antiquated terms or phrases as a convenience for the modern reader. A Scripture and subject index are also included. In this set of sermons, Calvin particularly addresses free justification by faith alone, Christian liberty, the abolishing of the ceremonial law (and its implications), the force and effect of the moral law, and the pure walk of the Christian life.
(Hardcover) $79.95-25%=59.96

CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on Psalm 119 (1580, 1996)
"Through this classic 400 year-old work, Calvin brings the reader to a clear and striking awareness: of his sinful and needy condition; of who God is; of the magnificence of the Word of God; and hence why we need to seek him and the mind of Christ through His Word with our whole heart! These sermons reveal not simply Calvin the theologian and expositor, but Calvin the preacher and pastor to those placed under his care" (back cover). 454 pages, indexed.
(Hardcover) $59.95-34%=39.58

CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on Timothy and Titus

This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 22 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm


 CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on Deuteronomy (1583)

Faithfully Gathered Word for Word As He Preached Them In Open Pulpit; Together With A Preface of the Ministers of the Church of Geneva, and An Admonishment Made By the Deacons There. Also There Are Annexed Two Profitable Tables, the One Containing the Chief Matters; the Other the Places of Scripture Herein Alleged.

 

Charles Spurgeon, in Commenting and Commentaries, writes, "This is not the same as that which is contained in Calvin's Commentaries. Everything that Calvin wrote by way of exposition is priceless; even those who differ from him in theology admit this."

 

"The 200 sermons Calvin preached on the Book of Deuteronomy in 1555-56 remain one of the finest examples of evangelical preaching. This is a quality facsimile reproduction of Arthur Golding's translation of the Deuteronomy sermons first published in 1583" (BOT).

 

"As the Reformation began to consolidate in Geneva, John Calvin preached 200 sermons on Deuteronomy, on weekdays from March, 1555, to July, 1556. In these sermons we find Calvin expounding Deuteronomy in detail, making applications to the social and political life of Geneva, as well as to the personal lives of her citizens.

 

Calvin preached these sermons in order to show the people the kind of Christian republic God wanted them to have, as well as what God required regarding personal and ecclesiastical sanctification.

 

Those who sow the wind will reap the whirlwind! That's what God told the prophet Hosea to tell Israel in the eighth century B.C. (Hosea 8:7), and that's what John Calvin told the citizens of Geneva in A.D. 1556. Unlike many Christians in the western world today, Calvin was convinced that God is alive and active in history. Nations that pleased God by faith-filled obedience to His revealed will would be blessed by God, while those who angered God by rebellious disobedience to His laws would receive curses from Him.

 

These blessings and curses are not only spiritual, but are also social, agricultural, political, meteorological, and in fact are manifested in every area of national life. Thus, Calvin called the people of Geneva to walk a straight line before God, so that He might give them peace and not war, prosperity and not famine, life and not death.

 

Calvin showed from the book of Deuteronomy that God has set up a covenant with His people, and that God enforces that covenant. The principles of that covenant are every bit as relevant after the cross as they were before it, Calvin insisted.

 

The Protestant Reformation transformed the western world because it held to a belief in a living, active, covenant-enforcing God. If we want to recover our cultures from ruin, we must return to Biblical principles of life, and to the God of the covenant.

 

These sermons are as timely today as when they were first preached. Cultures that depart from God fall under His judgment. So says the Bible, and so said John Calvin. Cultures that obey God, however, receive His blessing. If there is a message that the Western world (and all Christians) need to hear at the present time, surely this is it.

 

In conclusion, we note that Calvin's sermons were published in English in the 1580's, and went through three editions. They have been highly influential in the development of English and American Christian culture. These sermons are not only valuable in showing the thought of one of the most profound shapers of the modern world, but they are also powerful reading, and will be of tremendous value to pastors, seminarians, and teachers" (adapted from http://freebooks.entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/2212_47e.htm).

 

These volumes also include a Scripture index and "A Table of All and Singular The Doctrines of Master John Calvin Delivered in His Two Hundred Sermons Upon Deuteronomy, Gathered and Laid Together in Order By the Letter (Alphabetically--RB) in the Form of a Concordance, by Abraham Fleming." Both tables together consist of 151 pages! There are1408 (8.5" X 11") pages in this set.

 

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(Hardcover photocopy, 3 vol.) $130.00 (US funds) [$40 off!]

(Banner of Truth Hardcover, ) was $149.95 (US funds) [20 off!]

 

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(Bound photocopy, 2 vol.) $149.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy, 3 vol.) $170.00 (US funds)

(Banner of Truth Hardcover, ) was $169.95 (US funds)

 This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 22 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CALVIN, JOHN

Sermons on Job (1574)

 

"Calvin preached on the Book of Job on week-days in 1554-55. These sermons abound in faithful and lively exposition, and remain one of the finest examples of evangelical preaching.

 

This quality facsimile edition is a reproduction of Arthur Golding's translation of the Job sermons first published in 1574." (BOT)

"Here is Calvin at his best, dealing with God's majesty, inscrutability, and all-inclusive providence.

Marked by a directness, clarity, and simplicity, Calvin's series of sermons on Job is probably the most famous of all his published sermons. The Geneva reformer expresses in these messages his deep, awesome sense of the majesty of God.

A true understanding of Calvin cannot be gained without reading his sermons, for Calvin thought himself first of all a preacher, then a theologian.

In the introduction, Harold Dekker states:

'Calvin's treatment of Job is intensely practical. It is a living, breathing thing. It throbs with moral and spiritual reality. Job's pulse is there. Ethical passages are prominent, involving the family, society, the church and the state, as well as the individual life... This is the living Word! It has to do with Job and his God, Job and his fellows, Job and himself. And Job is always every believer. That makes great preaching.'

Since the Book of Job is one of the few major biblical writings on which Calvin did not write a commentary, these twenty sermons are of exegetical and expository interest as well as homiletical." (From the back cover of the , edited, softcover version).

 

783 (8.5" X 11") pages.

 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO AND INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(Bound photocopy, 2 vol.) $39.98 (US funds) [$60 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy, 2 vol.) $60.00 (US funds) [$60 off!]

(Banner of Truth Hardcover) $99.95 (US funds) [20 off!]

 

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(Bound photocopy, 2 vol.) $99.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy, 2 vol.) $120.00 (US funds)

(Banner of Truth Hardcover) $119.95 (US funds) [$30 off!]

 

This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 22 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm

 

"The Second Sermon Upon the First Chapter of Job (or "Feasts and Godly Children") on Job 1:2-5," from the book above, Sermons on the Book of Job (1574), is also available on all 30 Reformation Bookshelf CDs (in the "FREE BOOKS" file) at http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm (along with 100 other free books and articles on each CD!).

FREE audio (MP3) samples from Calvin's Sermons on Job are at:

Sermons on Job #1 (Introduction) from John Calvin's Sermons on Job (Job 1:1) at:
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=11302113454

Sermons on Job #2 (Riches, Poverty, Family, etc.) from John Calvin's Sermons on Job (Job 1:2-5) at:
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=11302143926


CALVIN, JOHN

(Edited and Translated by B.W. Farley)

Sermons on the Ten Commandments

 

"A collection of sixteen sermons by John Calvin that shed light on his understanding and application of the Ten Commandments.

 

Widely known as one of the church's most significant theologians, John Calvin was also a skilled preacher with the ability to proclaim biblical truth with power and relevance. These sermons develop the essence of his teaching on the moral law in a popular and engaging manner.

 

Pastors preaching through the Ten Commandments, Bible students, and anyone interested in Calvin's views on the Ten Commandments will take great delight in reading his exposition of the Decalogue, which is called 'the true and eternal rule of righteousness [for all] who wish to conform their lives to God's will'" (back cover).

 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO AND INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(Softcover) $29.95 (US funds) [$5 off!]

 

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR DISCOUNTED PRICE BELOW APPLIES

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NEW CALVIN TAPES -- FIRST TIME EVER ON CASSETTE!

FIRST TIME ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS!

CALVIN, JOHN

1. Suffering Outside the Camp

2. Separation From False Worship, Idolatry, and Popish Principles

3. Seeking the Lord's Face

4. The Importance of Outward Means of Grace

 

These sermons are excerpted from Calvin's recently translated Come Out From Among Them: The "Anti-Nicodemite" Writings of John Calvin (as read by Greg Barrow and Lyndon Dohms). These sermons, as well as the other recently translated Calvin sermons and other writings on worship, separation, the Nicodemite controversy and enduring suffering and persecution are now available in text form on the new PHP CD (http://www.swrb.com/catalog/R.htm , under "REED, KEVIN") or in the new hardcover book titled, Come Out From Among Them: The "Anti-Nicodemite" Writings of John Calvin (see below).

 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

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(Video) $6.99 each (US funds) [$20 off!]

 

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(Cassette) $9.95 (US funds) each

(Video) $26.99 each (US funds)

 

FREE AUDIO MP3 SERMONS by JOHN CALVIN!

To hear FREE audio (MP3) sermons from JohnCalvin, as contained in this important recently translated book, Come Out From Among Them: The "Anti-Nicodemite" Writings of John Calvin, please go to:

Separation From False Worship, Idolatry & Popish Principles
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=8320101619

Suffering Outside the Camp
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=7210112851

Seeking the Lord's Face
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=8130112743

The Importance of Outward Means of Grace
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=7290123154


NEW CALVIN TAPES -- FIRST TIME EVER ON CASSETTE!

 

CALVIN, JOHN

Shunning the Unlawful Rites of the Ungodly and Preserving the Purity of the Christian Religion

 

Herein Calvin maintains the sinfulness of outward conformity to false worship. Dealing with a major problem of his day, Calvin answers the question, "Is it lawful for a person who has renounced Popery in his heart to conform outwardly to its rites, for the purpose of avoiding persecution, or for any other cause?" He shows that false worship should never be tolerated or participated in (even by your bodily presence), no matter what the cost -- whether it be persecution, exile, or death. For his faithfulness in this matter, he was greatly scorned. Obvious parallels to our day abound, not the least of which include the Lordship controversy, false ecumenism, rampant idolatry in the false rites maintained in the public worship of apostate Protestantism, and in the rise of Roman Catholic harlot. A good related item is Bradford's The Hurt of Hearing Mass ($US2.94).

 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(2 cassettes) $3.99 (US funds) [$11 off!]

(Rare bound photocopy) $4.99 (US funds) [$5 off!]

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AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR DISCOUNTED PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(2 cassettes) $14.99 (US funds)

(Rare bound photocopy) $9.99 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds)

 

This retypeset edition of this book is also available on all 30 Reformation Bookshelf CDs (in the "FREE BOOKS" file) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm (along with 100 other free books and articles!). Excerpted for the RBCDs from the "Library of Presbyterian Heritage and Protestant Heritage Press" CD (listed at http://www.swrb.com/catalog/R.htm under "REED KEVIN"). Used by permission.

 

Listen to this book for FREE at: http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=21901175234


CALVIN, JOHN

Treatises Against the Anabaptists and Against the Libertines
Tracts on the Anabaptists and the Libertines, containing some of Calvin's most significant ethical and theological reflections.
(Softcover) $49.95-20%=$39.96 (US funds)

CALVIN, JOHN

Treatises on the Sacraments

This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 17 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CALVIN, JOHN

The True Method of Giving Peace to Christendom and of Reforming the Church (1548)
A clear call to reject Romish rites, idolatry, and all methods of reform not true to Scripture. Calvin shows why compromises with lukewarm adherents of Protestantism, modern day Nicodemites so to speak, must be rejected. Even Calvin's beloved friend Melancthon receives a rebuke here, as Calvin steadfastly proclaims the path of duty, though it would mean persecution and death at the hand of Rome for some. In spite of the severe hardships his teaching would cause, Calvin maintained the impossibility of reconciling two systems so discordant as Popery and Protestantism - for matters of eternity were (and are) involved here. Eire's War Against the Idols ($39.95) sets the context of these debates, which are being renewed again in our day.
(Rare bound photocopy) $12.98

(Hardcover photocopy) $25.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 18 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CALVIN, JOHN

Truth for All Time: A Brief Outline of the Christian Faith (translated by Scott Olyott, 1998)
"John Calvin knew that if the biblical truths rediscovered at the Reformation were to spread throughout the world, they would have to be presented in a form which ordinary people could understand. So, during the winter of 1536-1537, the 29-year-old Calvin wrote, in French, his Brief Outline of the Christian Faith... (This) is Calvin's striking but concise attempt to define the Christian faith for ordinary people!... Here you have the very core of Protestant belief and feel the warmth of its ardent love for God and men. As you read this book you will sense that the truth of God, so clearly taught here, is something that you are expected to live. May this be the experience of every reader who, by reading this book, is looking at the Christian faith for the first time. And may this increasingly be the experience of all of us who, by God's kindness have already been brought into personal union with our Lord Jesus Christ" (from the Preface by Scott Olyott). 96 pages.
(Softcover) $9.95-20%=$7.96 (US funds)

CALVIN, JOHN

The Unity of the Reformed Churches
John Cennick once disputed the doctrine of election with Charles Wesley, the noted "hymn" writer. He writes, Wesley "fell into a violent passion and affrighted all at the table... He called Calvin the firstborn son of the Devil, and set all his people into a bitter hatred of me" (cited in Christian History magazine, Vol. 12, No. 2, p. 22). In a more modern setting, the infamous Jimmy Swaggart seemed to concur with Wesley when he stated "Calvin has, I believe, caused untold millions of souls to be damned..." (Christian History magazine, Vol. 5, No. 4, p. 3 [this whole issue is devoted to John Calvin]). Notwithstanding these slanderous Arminian evaluations of Calvin, those who knew him best had very different words commemorating this great Reformer. "Nicolas des Gallars, a member of his pastoral team, admirably summed up Calvin's pastoral ministry: "What labours, what long waking hours, what worries he bore... with what faithfulness and intelligence he took an interest in everyone; with what kindness and good will he received those who turned to him; with what rapidity and openness he answered those who questioned him on the most serious of question; with what wisdom he received, both privately and publicly, the difficulties and problems brought to him; with what gentleness he comforted the afflicted, raised those who were laid low and discouraged; with what firmness he resisted the enemy; with what zeal he brought low the proud and stubborn; with what greatness of soul he endured misfortune; with what moderation he behaved in prosperity; with what skill and enthusiasm, finally, he acquitted himself of all the duties of a true and faithful servant of God, words of mine could never express" (Christian History magazine, Vol. 5, No. 4, p. 10). With a Pastor's heart, Calvin's concern for Church unity can be clearly seen in these letters written to Farel, Melanchthon and Bullinger. Calvin's only letter to Martin Luther is also included.
(Rare bound photocopy) $9.95-70%=2.99

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 27 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


COMMENTARIES BY JOHN CALVIN IN FRENCH

L'Epitre de Jacques by John Calvin (Hardcover) $39.95 (Canadian fudns)

L'Evangile de Jean by John Calvin (Hardcover) $19.95 (Canadian fudns)

L'Harmonie Evangelique by John Calvin (Hardcover) $39.95 (Canadian fudns)

Le Livre de la Genese by John Calvin (Hardcover) $19.95 (Canadian fudns)

Les Epitres aux Gal, Eph, Phil, Col by John Calvin (Hardcover) $19.95 (Canadian fudns)

Les Epitres Pastorales: Thess, Tim, Tite by John Calvin (Hardcover) $39.95 (Canadian fudns)


FREE: The Life of Mr. RICHARD CAMERON (taken from Biographia Scoticana by John Howie)

CAMERON, RICHARD

Angels and Offenders
Here Cameron deals with many topics including angels, church discipline, the wrath of God, humility, conversion, perseverance, independency, etc. This sermon is read (by Ruling Elder Lyndon Dohms) from the book Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland, by Sufferers for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ
($19.99).
(Cassette) $9.95-60%=3.98

FREE MP3s by RICHARD CAMERON at http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?speakerOnly=true&currSection=sermonsspeaker&keyword=Richard%5ECameron

CAMERON, RICHARD

The Calvinistic Covenanter at Perfect Peace Amid Trials and Persecution
This sermon proclaims God's sovereignty over all as the basis for that perfect peace "which passeth all understanding" (Phil. 4:7; Isa. 26:3). It further explains how to attain calmness of spirit, even in the most trying of times (and remember that the preacher and hearers of this message were being hounded as criminals for covenant faithfulness -- and often executed or imprisoned for not defecting to the Prelatical and Royalist beasts [which would have been contrary to the biblical vows which bound them in the Solemn League and Covenant]). This sermon also rebukes the enemies of Christ's covenanted Zion and assures the faithful of the Lord's ultimate and complete victory. It is ideal to listen to if you are ever discouraged, disquieted in spirit or distraught by the apparent success of those who oppose Christ's kingdom. It was also the last sermon Cameron preached (July 18, 1680), three days before he was killed at Ayrsmoss. "The text was from the Psalms: 'Be still and know that I am God; I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth' ... Cameron spent the last night of his life at Meadowhead on the Water of Ayr. In the morning, when he had washed his hands, he looked upon them and said, 'This is their last washing; I had need to wash them clean, for there are many to see them'" (Sermons Delivered in Times of Persecution in Scotland
, p. 380). He was killed in battle later that day, overwhelmed by superior numbers. Cameron's head and hands were then "taken to Edinburgh and presented to the Council by one who, though an enemy, said, 'There are the head and hands of a man who lived praying and preaching, and died praying and fighting'" (Ibid.). Following this incident, Cameron's own father gave us a prime example of the application of the very principles preached in this sermon by his son (i.e. how laying hold of the doctrine of God's absolute sovereignty and wisdom gives a peace that the world has no way of understanding). M'Leod, citing Crookshank in his A Scriptural View of the Character, Causes, and Ends of the Present War (p. 223), relates that "the tyrannical council, in the refinement of cruelty, ordered them (Cameron's head and hands--RB) to be shown to his worthy Father, now in prison for the same cause. He was asked if he knew them. The good man took them in his hands, kissed them, and said, 'I know them, they are my son's, my dear son's: Good is the will of the Lord, who cannot wrong me or mine.'" It is also interesting to note that as Robert M'Ward lifted his hands from Cameron's head, at his ordination (sometime earlier), he is reported to have said, "Behold, all ye beholders, here is the head of a faithful minister and servant of Jesus Christ, who shall lose the same for his Master's interest, and it shall be set up before sun and moon in the view of the world" (Sermons, p. 379). M'Ward's prophecy, of course, was fulfilled in detail subsequent to Cameron's death (as the historical account of the public display made of Cameron's head and hands, by his enemies, attests). This sermon is read by ruling elder Lyndon Dohms and is taken from the book Sermons Delivered in Times of Persecution in Scotland, by Sufferers for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ ($39.00 HP, $19.99 P). It is a fine example of the faithful preaching of the whole counsel of God under the most extreme of conditions.
(Cassette) $3.98

CAMERON, RICHARD

God Defends His Covenanted Remnant
Cameron, the "lion of the Covenant," had to travel to Holland to receive ordination at the hands of two of Samuel Rutherford's former students, McWard and Brown of Wamphray (who were earlier exiled to the Netherlands for faithfulness to Christ's cause). Cameron could not be ordained in Scotland due to the fact that all the other "presbyterian" ministers remaining in Scotland had defected from the covenanted cause. But Cameron (as Elijah and others before him) persevered, as the church is often brought to such extremities concerning her public testimony. Holding to the attainments won at Westminster and in the Solemn League and Covenant, Cameron refused to yield an inch of the blood bought ground he occupied. He was later joined by a second minister, Donald Cargill, and both were eventually martyred for their unwillingness to "sell" even the least of the church's covenanted attainments (Prov. 23:23). He was said to be a powerful preacher and this sermon gives us a glimpse of what it must have been like to hear him. It covers numerous topics but focuses on Christ's victory in His church and God's anger against those who oppose his faithful servants. It contains a testimony against unlawful civil rulers and against Scotland's national apostasy (and covenant breaking). It also defends the use of defensive arms, the testimony of the Scottish martyrs during the killing times and some of the specific attainments of the covenanted Reformation. Here again we get a taste of Covenanter field preaching in days of great persecution. This sermon is read (by Ruling Elder Lyndon Dohms) from the book Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland, by Sufferers for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ
($19.99).
(Cassette) $9.95-60%=3.98

FREE: The Life of Mr. RICHARD CAMERON (taken from Biographia Scoticana by John Howie)


GRANT, MAURICE

The Lion of the Covenant: The Story of Richard Cameron (1997)
"A man of savoury gospel spirit, Richard Cameron and his bold preaching remained a treasured memory for many long after his death. And his willingness to die for the right of Christ to rule in his church emboldened many Scottish Covenanters to persevere in their faith. In our day, when such boldness for the gospel seems sadly lacking among evangelicals, Maurice Grant's life of this Covenanter field-preacher reminds us of what can be accomplished for God when we are gripped by a resolute zeal for his glory. Surely, if Cameron could speak across the centuries to our day, he would rebuke us for our lukewarmness. Here, then, is a story to inspire God's people to rise up and declare that Jesus Christ alone is King -- King of the conscience and King of the nations." (Haykin, back cover). 335 pages.
(Softcover) $29.95-20%=$23.96 (US funds)

CANDLISH, JAMES S.

The Kingdom of God Biblically and Historically Considered

This book is also available on Protestant Bookshelf CD volume 24 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/protestant-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CANDLISH, ROBERT S.

Commentary on 1 John

This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 26 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm


Includes seven sermons and one lecture by Richard Cameron!

COVENANTED MINISTERS OF SCOTLAND

Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland (1880 edition)

This book (of 674 pages) records some of the most powerful sermons ever put into print, most being delivered during the "killing times" in Scotland.

These faithful preachers were daily in danger of losing their earthly lives for their testimony to the truth of Christ's kingship (which they proclaim here) -- and many were eventually martyred for His covenanted cause.

 

The original title of this book, instructive in itself, reads (in part),

 

"A Collection of Lectures and Sermons Preached upon Several Subjects, Mostly in the Time of the Late Persecution. Wherein a Faithful Doctrinal Testimony is Transmitted to Posterity for the Doctrine, Worship, Discipline and Government of the Church of Scotland against Popery, Prelacy, Erastianism, etc.... and a Sermon on the Breach of Covenant by Mr. John Guthrie."

 

Each set of sermons in this book is prefaced with a helpful three to six page biographical notice.

 

The following ministers are included (with the number of their sermons in this book noted in parentheses after their name): William Guthrie (17); Michael Bruce (3); John Weldwood (4); Richard Cameron (7 sermons and 1 lecture); Donald Cargill (7 sermons and 3 lectures); Alexander Peden (2); Alexander Shields (2 sermons and 1 lecture); John Livingstone (1 sermon and 1 sacramental discourse); John Welch (1 sermon and 1 sacramental discourse); John Guthrie (1). Includes illustrations and the original preface (written March 19, 1779) by John Howie (author of Biographia Scoticana, or The Scots Worthies).

An instructive and useful commemorative sermon, "A Third Reformation Necessary: or, The Piety, Principles, and Patriotism of Scotland's Covenanted Martyrs; With Application to the Present Times," by Kerr, preached on the bi-cententary of the covenanting struggle, is also included. Contains some of the most soul stirring preaching you may ever read! 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

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AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR DISCOUNTED PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(Rare bound photocopy) $99.95-70%=$29.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $39.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 29 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

NO COST COVENANTER SERMONS IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION (MP3 sermons from this book!)
http://www.sermonaudio.com/new_details3.asp?ID=11111

Some of these sermons (along with those by Calvin, Knox, Rutherford, Gillespie, et al.) have been read on tape and are available for sale (on cassette or video) at http://www.swrb.com/music/cassets.htm or as FREE MP3 audio at http://www.sermonaudio.com/swrb.

The Fellowship of Christ's Sufferings by Alexander Peden, which is one of the free sermons from this book, can be accessed directly at http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=93020483. Click on the "List entire series" link to view other free sermons from Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland.


CAMERONIAN

Was the Bishop's Death Murder? (1860)
This book deals with the death of James Sharp. He was a Resolutioner (i.e. backslidden Covenanter) turned persecuting Prelate, who after becoming Archbishop of St. Andrews began a relentless persecution of his former colleagues. He helped to revive the notorious Court of High Commission in 1664, with himself as president. This court persecuted nonconformist protestants, over religious issues, and was especially fond of doing the Royalist beast's bidding in regards to Presbyterian ministers (who dissented from both the civil and ecclesiastical Episcopalian establishment). This court had absolute power and could and did hand out death sentences (adapted from the Dictionary of Scottish Church History
, p. 768). "This article refers to the killing of Arch-bishop James Sharpe, in 1779, by a handful of Covenanters who providentially crossed paths with the bloody bishop -- the architect of the slaughter of thousands of innocents. In the words of a contemporary, Alexander Shields, 'Upon the 3d of May, 1679, several worthy gentlemen, with some other men of courage and zeal for the cause of God and the good of the country, executed righteous judgement upon him in Magus Moor near St Andrews'" (Editor's note in the Original Covenanter and Contending Witness magazine, vol. 2, #16, August 5, 1994). For a more detailed defense of the Protestant doctrine expounded in this short introductory book, see Shields' massive tome, A Hind Let Loose ($39.99); specifically part 3, head 6: "The Suffering of Some, upon the Account of Extraordinary executing of Judgement upon Notorious Incendiaries, and Murdering Public Enemies by Private Persons in the Circumstances Wherein they were Stated Vindicated."
(Rare bound photocopy) $4.99 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $16.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 26 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CARRUTHERS, S. W.

The Preparation and Printing of the Westminster Confession of Faith

 

An account of the preparation and printing of the WCF's seven leading editions, to which is appended a critical text of the Confession, with notes thereon.

"Dr. Carruthers has brought within the compass of one volume a mass of information not readily accessible to those interested in the proceedings and works of the Assembly of Divines." - Professor John Murray.

Dedicated to Warfield, Mitchell and others.

157 pages.

 

ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTED SALE PRICE UP TO & INCLUDING September 13, 2010

(Rare Bound photocopy) $9.98 (US funds) [$30 off!]

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds) [$40 off!]

 

AFTER September 13, 2010, OUR REGULAR PRICE BELOW APPLIES

(Rare bound photocopy) $39.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $59.00 (US funds)

 

This book is also available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 18 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm


CARSLAW, W.H.

Exiles of the Covenant (1908 ed.)
"This volume may very properly be regarded as a sequel to Six Martyrs of the Scottish Reformation" (below). It deals with "those who were banished from Scotland and forbidden to return, or who left of their own accord that they might obtain elsewhere security for their liberty and lives. As England and Ireland were then separate and independent kingdoms, though under the same king as Scotland, we shall begin with them, and afterwards extend our enquiries to the Netherlands, and other parts of the Old World and New." Includes short biographies of 34 Covenanters, including Alexander Shields, James Fraser of Brea, Alexander Peden, John Brown [of Waphray] and Lady Grizzel Baillie, all who suffered exile because they would not relinquished the covenanted cause of Christ as exhibited in the National Covenant (1638) and Solemn Leagues and Covenant (1643). Ungodly tyrants, stirred by demonic hordes, hounded the faithful followers of Christ, during these eventful years. Drawing their authority (or power, Romans 13:1) from the beast and "framing mischief by law" (Ps. 94:20), the following quotation by Carslaw reveals the flavor of these "killing times," as wicked men ascended the throne "...on the death of Charles II, and the accession of his brother, an open Papist, this Solemn League and Covenant was once more publicly and officially disowned. By one of the Acts of his first Parliament in Edinburgh, "James, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith," pronounced all guilty of the crime of treason, "who would give or take this Covenant, or write in defence thereof, or own it as lawful, or binding on themselves, or others."
A great book for all, but especially for older home and Christan schoolers! 215 easy reading pages.
(Rare Bound Photocopy) $24.95-65%=$8.73 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $22.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 30 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CARSLAW, W.H.

The Life and Letters of James Renwick the Last Scottish Martyr (1893)
"Mr. Carslaw has skillfully interweaved the martyr's letters with the details of his life, and produced a thrilling picture of bloody and bygone days" (Dumfries Courier). "The most complete collection yet published of the correspondence of this noble and manly Scotchman" (Govan Press). "The Letters reveal a singularly religious and devout spirit, and give us a striking insight into the sweetness and light that existed in the rugged depths of these stern and uncompromising pillars of the Covenant" (Scottish Weekly). A major work to be consulted for the study of this period, as well as for insight into the life and death of the faithful martyr and covenanted Presbyterian minister James Renwick. Contains a facsimile of one of Renwick's letters. 267 pages.
(Bound photocopy) $49.95-85%=$7.49 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $15.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 30 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

Free MP3s of James Renwick's sermons are at http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?speakerOnly=true&currSection=sermonsspeaker&keyword=James%5ERenwick

CARSLAW, W.H.

The Life and Times of Donald Cargill
"A careful and well written memoir by an author who has shown his competency by his valuable edition of the Scots Worthies
" (British Weekly). "A thoroughly interesting and convenient account of a movement to which we owe much of the liberty we at present enjoy" (Glasgow Herald). A longer and more detailed account of the life and teaching of this field preaching Covenanted minister and martyr (who was a friend of Richard Cameron and studied under Samuel Rutherford at St. Andrews) can be found in Grant's No King But Christ ($15.96, softcover). 139 pages.
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Free MP3s of Donald Cargill's sermons are at http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?SpeakerOnly=true&currSection=sermonsspeaker&keyword=Donald%5ECargill

CARSLAW, W.H.

The Life and Times of James Renwick (1900)
The author notes, "(s)ome years ago, when I edited Renwick's Letters (i.e. The Life and Letters of James Renwick the Last Scottish Martyr
, $24.00 HP, $14.99 P --RB), while thankful for the opportunity of presenting these in full, I was afraid that the excessive length and involved style of some of them would not enhance their popularity. This time I have contented myself with only a few extracts, and these generally of a personal character. The Informatory Vindication (full edition $19.00 HP, $9.99 P, -- RB), also, which has been described as Renwick's masterpiece, has been given in a very abridged form." 111 pages.
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CARSLAW, W.H.

Six Martyrs of the Scottish Reformation (1907 ed.)
Carslaw, who also edited Scots Worthies, notes in his preface: "When we speak of the Scottish Reformation, we should never forget that the name is applicable to two great religious and national movements, separated from each other by the greater part of a century. The one, which reached its culmination in 1560, when the first Reformed Assembly met in Edinburgh, was the Reformation from Popery. The other, which found expression in the National Covenant of 1638, was the Reformation from Prelacy and all its works. The former was preceded by the martyrdom of such men as Patrick Hamilton, George Wishart, and Walter Myln. The latter was followed by the fifty-years' struggle of the Covenanters..." Beside setting forth the testimonies of the three martyrs of the first Reformation noted above, Carslaw has also selected three from the second Reformation, these being James Guthrie, Marquis of Argyll and Sir Archibald Johnstone, Lord Warriston (who helped Alexander Henderson in the preparation of the Scottish National Covenant [1638] against the polices of Charles I and was one of the Scottish commissioners appointed to the Westminster Assembly). Three appendices are also included.
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CARSLAW, W.H.

Three Heroes of the Covenant: The Life and Times of William Guthrie, Donald Cargill and James Renwick, Last of the Martyrs (1902)
Three books in one (of almost 400 pages) by the editor of Scots Worthies
, produced for "the elucidation of the Cameronian annals" (i.e. for bringing to light and explaining the history of the Covenanters). An easy reading run over some of the most fascinating and edifying history in the life of the Christian church -- including her Reformation battles against both the civil and ecclesiastical beasts. Useful for family readings, home schooling, and general Christian education and edification.
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FREE COVENANTER SERMONS IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION
http://www.sermonaudio.com/new_details3.asp?ID=11111

CASE, THOMAS

Of Sabbath Sanctification (1674, reprinted 1844)
Sets forth the duty and privilege of Sabbath sanctification as based upon the text: "If thou turn away thy foot from the sabbath, from doing thy pleasure on my holy day; and call the sabbath a delight, the holy of the LORD, honourable; and shalt honour him, not doing thine own ways, nor finding thine own pleasure, nor speaking thine own words: Then shalt thou delight thyself in the LORD; and I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth, and feed thee with the heritage of Jacob thy father: for the mouth of the LORD hath spoken it" (Isa. 58:13-14). A Puritan sermon dealing faithfully with "the market day of the soul." Sure to produce strong consternation among all classes of antinomians, infidels, and demons.
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CARYL, JOSEPH

The Nature, Solemnity, Grounds, Property, and Benefits of a Sacred Covenant together with the duties of those who enter into such a covenant 1643.

 

In this sermon the famous Puritan preacher Joseph Caryl exhorts his listeners to take the Solemn League and Covenant. Among other benefits, Caryl notes that covenanting draws the line between those who support the work of Reformation and those who oppose it:

 

"A Covenant is to a nation as a fan to the floor, which purges away the chaff, and purifies the wheat. It is like the furnace to the metal, which takes away the dross, and shows you a refined lump. It is a Shibboleth to distinguish Ephraimites from Gileadites, Judg. 12:6. And who knows not how great an advantage it is for the successful carrying on of any honourable design, to know friends from enemies, and the faithful from false brethren?" (p. 22).

 

Covenanting also entails great blessings spiritually. "If we knew that every loss were our gain, every wound our healing, every disappointment our success, every defeat our victory, would we not rejoice? Do but know what it is to be in Covenant with God; and be sad, be hopeless if you can. It is to have the strength and counsels of Heaven engaged for you" (p. 38).

 

But, of course, we don't look to the Covenant itself for blessing, but to the God of the Covenant. "Trust to God in Covenant, not to your Covenant. Make not your Covenant, your Christ; no, not for this temporal salvation. As a horse trusted to, is a vain thing to save a man, Psal. 32. so likewise is a Covenant trusted to; neither can it deliver a nation by its great strength: though indeed the strength of it be greater, then the strength of many horses" (p. 40).

 

And finally, Caryl exhorts his listeners, "Seeing then our princes, our magistrates, our ministers, and our people, have freely consented to, written, and sworn this Covenant; let us all in our several places, up and be doing, that the Lord may be with us, not sit still and do nothing, and so cause the Lord to turn against us" (pp. 42-43).

 

This is another great sermon impressing Christians to swear the Solemn League and Covenant, a document that is still binding today upon all Christians in Great Britain and the countries descending therefrom (Canada, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, etc.).

 

45 pages.

 

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CARYL, JOSEPH

Practical Observations on Job (12 volumes, 1644-1666, 2001)

 

For the first time in hundreds of years, Joseph Caryl's massive work (of about 9000 pages) of Puritan exposition on the book of Job has been reprinted.

 

Caryl was a leading nonconformist in his day, a member of the famous Westminster Assembly of divines, and a faithful expositor of God's Word. It was widely known that he lived his sermons. Few men in history have exhausted the Book of Job as Caryl has done. He has deeply mined the riches of a much-neglected book and brought them to the fore.

 

Please note that this is a limited, one-time only, print-run. After all the sets are sold, there will not be a reprinting, so order your set now while they are still available.

 

We wholeheartedly assent with James Reid in his Memoir of the Westminster Divines that Caryl's exposition should be in the library of every pastor and student of theology.

 

An abridgement of this work was published in Edinburgh in 1836, but the words of Spurgeon are ever relevant, "We do not believe in an abridgment of a book which is good throughout. Think of twelve large volumes condensed into one small one! An ox in a gallipot [a small jar used to hold medicines] is nothing to it" (Commenting on Commentaries, p. 76).

 

Though one may initially question the usefulness of a twelve-volume set on Job, Spurgeon reminds us that "Caryl will not exhaust the patience of a student who is a lover of every letter of the Word," because in the course of expounding Job to his congregation he illustrated a very large portion of the Bible with great clarity, considering Scripture as a whole. It is a work that in Spurgeon's eyes as well as ours "can scarcely be superseded or surpassed" (Ibid, p. 76).

 

Caryl prefaced his work, saying, "This book of Job bears the image of these times, and presents us with a resemblance of the past, present, and (much hoped for) future condition of this nation. As the personal prosperity of Job, so his troubles look like our national troubles; and why not the parallel be made up, by a likeness in our restoration?" What Caryl saw was a similitude between Job's teachings and the calamities and prosperities of England. Caryl carries this parallel throughout his exposition, and it must be noted that his comments are easily applied to America in these drastic times. Caryl's exposition, however, is much more than a social commentary on national disasters--in fact, most of it is concerned with unveiling the condition of the human heart, breaking man's innate pride, and uplifting God's chosen people. It is literally a course in practical divinity, taught from the lips of Job! His applications are meaty and timeless.

 

Dr. Derek W. H. Thomas, professor of Systematic and Practical Theology at Reformed Theological Seminary, wrote of Caryl's work:

 

"When researching for Ph.D. work on Calvin's Sermons on Job in 1995, I spent a day at London Theological Seminary examining the twelve volumes of Caryl on Job in the library of the late Dr. Martyn Lloyd Jones. Needless to say, the day proved insufficient! and I was reminded then of Archibald Alexander's remark that these volumes are a good exercise in that patience which the book of Job was intended to inculcate and exemplify! These sermons are worthy of reading for their exegetical insights, thoughtful applications, and pastoral sensitivity. Cotton Mather's assessment, that these sermons belong alongside Greenhill on Ezekiel, Burroughs on Hosea, Owen on Hebrews and Manton on James, can still be made."

 

Dr. Hywel R. Jones of Westminster Seminary in California said:

 

"These sermons, preached to a London congregation, were published by order of Parliament. But that was in the seventeenth century! Now, at the beginning of the third millennium, they are more than needed once again by members and officers in both church and state. Full of memorable 'sound-bites'--but with substance, they provide food for thought about God's mysterious ways and strength for obedience to his revealed will."

 

James Darling, in 1854, wrote,

 

"His Exposition of Job is a most elaborate, learned, judicious, and pious work... each volume has an index" (Darling, Cyclopaedia Bibliographica: A Library Manual of Theological and General Literature, p. 590, vol. 2, SWRB edition, http://www.swrb.com/catalog/d.htm ).

 

Joseph Caryl wrote in the last volume of his work that the Lord would restore all things, as spoken by the mouth of all his prophets, and that this should be our unceasing "cry to God in prayer, for all his sorrowing Jobs, even for all those who are any where companions in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ." He commended the perusal of his commentary "that, reading ye may understand, believe, and profit to sanctification, consolation, and salvation, according to the will of God."

 

These volumes are of the highest quality. The set contains 12 6 x 9 volumes bound in a high c-grade cloth, 50lb natural paper for ease of reading, reinforced hinges for long lasting binding, and smyth-sewn construction to make sure they last and providing a high quality facsimile reprint. It is the first time Caryl's mammoth exposition on Job has been reprinted in an unabridged form since the 17th century.

 

The publisher also writes, "We anticipate being nearly sold out soon as many orders have already been placed." The average set on the antiquarian market sells for nearly $US4,000.00.

 

The set includes a modern preface by Joel R. Beeke and Randall J. Pederson, containing biographical information on the life of Joseph Caryl, a famous Westminster divine.

 

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CAWDREY, DANIEL

The Inconsistency of the Independent Way, With Scripture and Itself (1651)

The inconsistency of the Independent way is "Manifested in a threefold Discourse: 1. Vindiciae Vindiciarum, or A further manifestation of John Cotton's contradictions, instanced in Vindiciae Clavium, Being A Rejoinder to his Reply (to some few of those many Contradictions) in his last Book, called, The Way of Congregational Churches Cleared, Part 2; 2. A Review of M. Hooker's Survey of Church-Discipline, the first part; 3. A Diatribe with the same M. Hooker Concerning Baptism of Infants of Non-confederate parents, Cap. 2. Of his third part (Whether the Infants of Believers not in Covenant with a visible Church, may be baptized)." 241 pages.

 

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CAWDREY, DANIEL

Independence a Great Schism: Proved Against Dr. (John--RB) Owen, His Apology in his Tract of Schism (1657)

Chapter titles include: Of the Nature of Schism in Scripture; Causeless Separation from a true Church is Schism; Of the Church Catholic Mystical, and its Union; Of the Church Catholic visible, and its Union; Independentism in Donatism; Of the particular Church, and its Union; Independentism, a great Schism. Also contains "an appendix to the former discourse of schism; showing the inconstancy of the Dr. and the inconsistency of his former and present opinions." Dr. Calamy called Cawdrey, "a man of great consideration, eminently learned, and a noted member of the (Westminster--RB) assembly of divines. He preached sometimes to the members of parliament... was ejected from his living at Great Billing, and separated from his friends and his flock, by the act of uniformity, after having laboured, for the edification of his people in that place, for 36 or 37 years" (Thomas Smith, Select Memoirs... of Pious and Learned English and Scottish Divines, pp. 488-489). 249 pages.

 

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CAWDREY, DANIEL

A Sober Answer, To A Serious Question (1652)
The title continues: "Propounded by Mr. G. Firmin, Minister of the Church in Shalford in Essex, viz., Whether the Ministers of England are bound, by the Word of God, to Baptize the children of all such Parents, which say, they believe in Jesus Christ; but are grossly Ignorant, Scandalous in their Conversation, Scoffers at Godliness, and refuse to submit to Church discipline. Which may serve as an Appendix to the Diatribe with Mr. Hooker, lately published, concerning Baptism of Infants, of Parents not confederate." 37 pages.
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CHALMERS, THOMAS

Application of Christianity to the Commercial and Ordinary Affairs of Life (1853)
A practical guide to help Christians conduct their business' and life in an honest and God fearing manner.
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CHANEY, JAMES M

William the Baptist (1877)

A concise and Scriptural case for infant baptism. Written as a lively dialogue between the author, as pastor, and William, a young lawyer with strong immersionist views, this is an entertaining and easy way to learn theology. Though he avoids caricature, Chaney maintains that "the difference between us and immersionists on the question of baptism is radical. Both cannot be right." An official Southern Presbyterian publication. 133 pages.

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CHANTRY, W.

The High Calling of Motherhood
Great encouragement for mothers, built around God's revelation regarding the "high calling" women attain to in serving their generation by raising a Godly seed. "The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children, To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed" (Titus 2:3-5).
(Pamphlet, 6 pages) $.99 each

CHAO, DR. CHARLES H.

Out of the Tiger's Mouth
Born in China in 1916, Charles Chao, is in the words of Dr. Loraine Boettner, "a man of God, with untiring devotion." His life's work has been for China. Despite persecution from Chinese communists, narrow escapes from prison and death, Charles Chao has not ceased to translate major Christian works (including the Westminster Confession of Faith and Boettner's Reformed Doctrine of Predestination, RB) for his fellow countrymen. This book tells the exiting story of this man's life, how God continually provided for the specific needs of his family, his work and himself. As you read this book, you will be amazed with God's timing and how God's plan in being unfolded in China" (back cover). Dr. Chao's work is being carried out through the Reformation Translation Fellowship (RTF). RTF's doctrinal basis is the Westminster Confession of Faith and gifts to support their work are tax deductible. They can be contacted at 302 East First Street, Bloomington, IN, 47401, USA (or by email at: 76122.1433@compuserve.com).
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Charnock's Writings by William Symington

An extract from the Life and Character of Charnock

The correctness of the composition, in these works, is remarkable, considering that they were not prepared for the press by the author himself, and that they must have been originally written amid scenes of distraction and turmoil, arising out of the events of the times. The latter circumstance may account for the manly vigor by which they are characterized, but it only renders their accuracy and polish the more wonderful. Refinement of taste and extensive scholarship can alone explain the chasteness, ease, and elegance of style, so free from all verbosity and clumsiness, which mark these productions. There were giants in literature in those days, and STEPHEN CHARNOCK was not the least of the noble fraternity.

Charnock may not have all the brilliancy of Bunyan, nor all the metaphysical acumen and subtle analysis of Howe, nor all the awful earnestness of Baxter; but he is not less argumentative, while he is more theological than any of them, and his theology, too, is more sound than that of some. "He was not," say the original editors of his works, "for that modern divinity which is so much in vogue with some, who would be counted the only sound divines; having tasted the old, he did not desire the new, but said the old is better." There is, therefore, not one of all the Puritan Divines whose writings can with more safety be recommended to the attention of students of divinity and young ministers. It is one of the happy signs of the times in which we live, that a taste for reading such works is beginning to revive; and we can conceive no better wish for the interests of mankind in general, and of our country in particular, than that the minds of our young divines were thoroughly impregnated with the good old theology to be found in such writings as those which we now take the liberty to introduce and recommend. "If a preacher wishes to recommend himself by the weight of his doctrines," to use the language of Mr Parsons, "he will find in the writings of Charnock the great truths of Scripture illustrated and explained in the most lucid and masterly manner. If he wishes to be distinguished by the evangelical strain of his discourses, and by the continual exhibition of Christ and him crucified, he will here find the characters of Christ, and the adaptation of the gospel to the circumstances and wants of man as a fallen creature, invariably kept in view. If he wishes for usefulness in the Church of God, here he has the brightest example of forcible appeals to the conscience, and of the most impressive applications of Scripture truth, to the various conditions of mankind. And, finally, if he reads for his own advantage as a Christian, his mind will be delighted with the inexhaustible variety here provided for the employment of his enlightened faculties, and his improvement in every divine attainment."

We cannot resist giving a few sentences from the original preface which his friends Adams and Veal prefixed to the treatise On the Existence and Attributes of God. "The sublimeness, variety, and rareness," say they, "of the truths handled, together with the elegance of the composure, neatness of the style, and whatever is wont to make any book desirable, all concur in the recommendation of it... It is not a book to be played with or slept over, but read with the most intense and serious mind; for, though it afford much pleasure for the fancy, yet much more work for the heart, and hath indeed in it enough to busy all the faculties. The dress is complete and decent, yet not garish nor theatrical; the rhetoric masculine and vigorous, such as became a pulpit, and was never borrowed from the stage. The expressions full, clear, apt, and such as are best suited to the weightiness and spirituality of the truths here delivered.

http://www.puritansermons.com/charnock/charnoc4.htm

At different points in his life Stephen Charnock was an assistant to John Owen and co-pastor with the Thomas Watson. So many people flocked to hear Charnock that people had to pass the message back to those behind, even to those standing all the way out the church door.

CHARNOCK, STEPHEN

The Cleansing Virtue of Christ's Blood
From volume 3 of Charnock's Works (33 pages).
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CHARNOCK, STEPHEN

Discourses Upon the Existence and Attributes of God (With His Life and Character by William Symington, D.D.), 2 Volumes (1853 edition)

"The Existence and Attributes of God is the greatest Puritan treatise on the perfections of God, and perhaps the greatest of all times. Here, Stephen Charnock reflects on Scripture to develop a better understanding of the nature and being of God. In true Puritan fashion, Charnock makes practical application of all the doctrinal content he develops. Thus, Charnock's work is rightly regarded as simultaneously a scholarly and devotional classic."

- Dr. Joel Beeke

This book covers topics such as: the existence of God; the failure of practical atheism; the spiritual nature of God; spiritual worship; God's eternality; God's immutability; God's omnipresence; God's knowledge (omniscience); God's wisdom; God's power; God's holiness; God's goodness; God's dominion; God's patience.

Stephen Charnock was an English minister during the seventeenth century. In the late 1650s he spent some time in Ireland as chaplain to the Governor, where his preaching attracted considerable attention. After King Charles II came to power in 1660, Charnock returned to England but was not permitted to hold a public ministry. He could only minister privately. This changed in 1675 when government restrictions were relaxed, and Charnock became co-pastor with Thomas Watson of a Presbyterian church in London. Charnock died in 1680.

William Symington, in his brief biography of Charnock at the beginning of this set, notes that Charnock had few friends, though those he had were godly and intelligent. "But his best and most highly cherished companions were his books, of which he had contrived to secure a valuable though select collection. With these he held frequent and familiar intercourse. Great part of his time, indeed, was spent in his study" (p. 13). 

"To a person of these studious habits it may easily be conceived what distress it must have occasioned to have his library swept away from him. In that dreadful misfortune which befell the metropolis in 1666, ever since known as 'the fire of London,' the whole of Charnock's books were destroyed. The amount of calamity involved in such an occurrence can be estimated aright only by those who know from experience the strength and sacredness of that endearment with which the real student regards those silent but instructive friends which he has drawn around him by slow degrees; with which he has cultivated a long and intimate acquaintance; which are ever at hand with their valuable assistance, counsel and consolation, when these are needed; which, unlike some less judicious companions, never intrude upon him against his will; and with whose very looks and positions, as they repose in their places around him, he has become so familiarized, that it is no difficult thing for him to call up their appearance when absent, or to go directly to them in the dark without the risk of a mistake. Some may be disposed to smile at this love of books. But where is the scholar who will do so? Where is the man of letters who, for a single moment, would place the stately mansions and large estates of the 'sons of earth' in comparison with his own well-loaded shelves? Where the student who, on looking round upon the walls of his study, is not conscious of a satisfaction greater and better far than landed proprietor ever felt on surveying his fields and lawns -- a satisfaction which almost unconsciously seeks vent in the exclamation, 'My library! a dukedom large enough!' Such, and such only, can judge what must have been Charnock's feelings, when he found that his much cherished volumes had become a heap of smouldering ashes" (p. 14)."

Symington also points out that

"All Charnock's writings are distinguished for sound theology, profound thinking, and lively imagination. They partake of that massive divinity for which the Puritan Divines were in general remarkable, and are of course orthodox in their doctrinal statements and reasonings. . . . In a word, for weight of matter, for energy of thought, for copiousness of improving reflection, for grandeur and force of illustration, and for accuracy and felicitousness of expression, Charnock is equalled by few, and surpassed by none of the writers of the age to which he belonged. . . . There were giants in literature in those days, and STEPHEN CHARNOCK was not the least of the noble fraternity" (p. 17).

And because his theology was so sound, there is "not one of all the Puritan Divines whose writings can with more safety be recommended to the attention of students of divinity and young ministers" (p. 18). 1149 pages.

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CHARNOCK, STEPHEN

The End, Subjects, and Worthy Partaking of the Lord's Supper
From volume 3 of Charnock's Works (90 pages). Demonstrates the purpose for the institution of this divine ordinance and the duty of worthy communicants.
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CHARNOCK, STEPHEN

Select Works of Stephen Charnock (1847)
Charnock was an English Puritan born in London in 1628. A divine of extensive learning and thought, he is most well known in our day for his Existence and Attributes of God. These Select Works include; "The Chief of Sinners Objects of the Choicest Mercy," "The Sinfulness and Cure of Thoughts," and five other pieces. William Symington contributes an essay on the life, character and writings of Charnock.
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CHARNOCK, STEPHEN
The Works of Stephen Charnock (5 volumes)

This set is available on Calvinism Bookshelf CD volume 6 (3 for 1 CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/calvinism-bookshelf-CDs.htm

 

Volume 1

Discourses Upon the Existence and Attributes of God Volume 1

 

With His Life and Character by William Symington, D.D.

 

Life and Character of the Author

Page 9

 

Preface

Page 21

 

Discourse I

On the Existence of God

Psalm xiv. 1.--The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. They are corrupt, they have done abominable works, there is none that doeth good.

Page 25

 

Discourse II

On Practical Atheism

Psalm xiv. 1.--The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. They are corrupt, they have done abominable works, there is none that doeth good.

Page 89

 

Discourse III

On God's Being a Spirit

John iv. 24.--God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.

Page 176

 

Discourse IV

On Spiritual Worship

John iv. 24.--God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.

Page 204

 

Discourse V

On the Eternity of God

Psalm xc. 2.--Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God.

Page 276

 

Discourse VI

On the Immutability of God

Psalm cii. 26, 27.--They shall perish, but thou shalt endure: yea, all of them shall wax old like a garment; as a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall have no end.

Page 310

 

Discourse VII

On God's Omnipresence

Jeremiah xxiii. 24.--Can any hide himself in secret places that I shall not see him? saith the Lord. Do not I fill heaven and earth? saith the Lord.

Page 363

 

Discourse VIII

On God's Knowledge

Psalm cxlvii. 5.--Great is our Lord, and of great power: his understanding is infinite.

Page 406

 

Discourse IX

On the Wisdom of God

Romans xvi. 27.--To God only wise, be glory through Jesus Christ for ever. Amen.

Page 498

 

 

The Works of Stephen Charnock

 

Volume 2

Discourses Upon the Existence and Attributes of God Volume 2

 

Discourse X

On the Power of God

Job xxvi. 14.--Lo, these are parts of his ways: but how little a portion is heard of him? but the thunder of his power who can understand?

Page 5

 

Discourse XI

On the Holiness of God

Exodus xv. 11.--Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?

Page 108

 

Discourse XII

On the Goodness of God

Mark x. 18.--And Jesus said unto him, Why callest thou me good? there is none good but one, that is, God.

Page 209

 

Discourse XIII

On God's Dominion

Psalm ciii. 19.--The Lord hath prepared his throne in the heavens; and his kingdom ruleth over all.

Page 356

 

Discourse XIV

On God's Patience

Nahum i. 3.--The Lord is slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit the wicked: the Lord hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of his feet.

Page 472

 

Index

Page 525

 

Index of Texts

Page 541

 

 

The Works of Stephen Charnock

 

Volume 3

The New Birth

 

Discourses

 

To The Reader

Page 3

 

The Necessity of Regeneration

John III. 3, 5.

Page 7

 

A Discourse of the Nature of Regeneration

2 Cor. V. 17.

Page 82

 

A Discourse of the Efficient of Regeneration

John I. 13.

Page 166

 

A Discourse of the Word, The Instrument of Regeneration

James I. 18.

Page 307

 

A Discourse of God's Being the Author of Reconciliation

2 Cor. V. 18, 19.

Page 336

 

A Discourse of the Cleansing Virtue of Christ's Blood

1 John I. 7.

Page 501

 

 

The Works of Stephen Charnock

 

Volume 4

The Knowledge of God

 

A Discourse of the Knowledge of God

John xvii. 3.

Page 3

 

A Discourse of the Knowledge of God in Christ

John xvii. 3.

Page 110

 

A Discourse of Conviction of Sin

John xvi. 8, 9.

Page 164

 

A Discourse of Unbelief, Proving it is the Greatest Sin

John xvi. 9.

Page 220

 

A Discourse of the Misery of Unbelievers

John iii. 36.

Page 296

 

A Discourse Shewing Who Are Unbelievers

John vi. 64.

Page 348

 

A Discourse of the End of the Lord's Supper

1 Cor. xi. 26

Page 392

 

A Discourse of the Subjects of the Lord's Supper

1 Cor xi. 28, 29

Page 427

 

A Discourse of the Unworthy Receiving of the Lord's Supper

1 Cor. xi. 27, 29.

Page 472

 

A Discourse of Self-Examination

2 Cor. xiii. 5.

Page 483

 

A Discourse of the Knowledge of Christ Crucified

1 Cor. ii. 2.

Page 494

 

A Discourse of Christ Our Passover

1 Cor. v. 7.

Page 507

 

A Discourse of the Voluntariness of Christ's Death

Eph. v. 2.

Page 540

 

A Discourse of the Acceptableness of Christ's Death

Eph. v. 2

Page 552

 

A Discourse of Obedience

John xv. 14.

Page 587

 

 

The Works of Stephen Charnock

 

Volume 5

Truth and Life

 

Discourses

 

A Discourse of the Necessity of Christ's Death

Luke xxiv. 26.

Page 3

 

A Discourse of the Necessity of Christ's Exaltation

Luke xxiv. 26.

Page 49

 

A Discourse of Christ's Intercession

1 John ii. 1.

Page 91

 

A Discourse of the Object of Faith

John xiv. 1

Page 145

 

A Discourse of Afflictions

Heb. xii. 5-11.

Page 178

 

A Discourse of the Removal of the Gospel

Rev. ii. 5.

Page 190

 

A Discourse of Mercy Received

Ps. lvi. 12, 13

Page 205

 

A Discourse of Mortification

Rom. viii. 13

Page 214

 

A Discourse Proving Weak Grace Victorious

Mat. xii. 20

Page 225

 

A Discourse of the Sinfulness and Cure of Thoughts

Gen. vi. 5.

Page 288

 

A Discourse of the Church's Stability

Ps. lxxxvii. 5.

Page 317

 

A Discourse Upon the Fifth of November

Exod. xv. 9, 10.

Page 350

 

A Discourse of Delight in Prayer

Ps. xxxvii. 4.

Page 370

 

A Discourse of Mourning for Other Men's Sins

Ezek. ix. 4.

Page 380

 

A Discourse for the Comfort of Child-Bearing Women

1 Tim. ii. 15.

Page 398

 

A Discourse of the Sins of the Regenerate

1 John iii. 9.

Page 414

 

A Discourse of the Pardon of Sin

Ps. xxxii. 1, 2.

Page 434

 

Man's Enmity to God

Rom. viii. 7.

Page 459

 

The Chief Sinners Objects of the Choicest Mercy

1 Tim. I. 15

Page 526

 

Index

Page 567

 

Index of Texts

Page 587

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CHINIQUY, CHARLES

Fifty Years in the Church of Rome (1886)

Why was this book written? "Because modern Protestants have not only forgotten what Rome was, what she is, and what she will forever be; the most irreconcilable and powerful enemy of the Gospel of Christ," writes Chiniquy. This is the life story of Pastor Chinquy, who was a priest in the Roman Catholic church for 25 years. Though he dedicates this book to the Bishops, Priests, and people of Rome, he writes, "the sophisms and errors of Romanism are discussed and refuted with a clearness, simplicity, and evidence, which my 25 years of priesthood only could teach me." It is written in a kindly and Christian spirit, does not indulge in denunciations, and while speaking the truth, it does so in love. This is the unabridged edition of over 600 pages.

 

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CHINIQUY, CHARLES

The Priest, the Woman, and the Confessional (c. 1890)

 

Chiniquy was one of the most famous Romanist priests to leave the pretended Romish communion and join the Presbyterians. This book (of 232 pages) contains important original documents establishing the high character and standing of pastor Chiniquy even while he was in the church of Rome. It also demonstrates, on the testimony of a long-time insider, how the harlotries of the Roman whore (Rev. 17-18) defile the body as well as the mind and soul. This is rarely made more evident than in what is here revealed by the ex-priest Chiniquy.

 

Chiniquy calls the confessional the "modern Sodom," and shows how auricular confession destroys all the sacred ties of marriage and human society. He also makes the case as to why this devilish monstrosity should not be tolerated among civilized nations.

 

Boettner, in his book Roman Catholicism (pp. 212-213) adds the following,

 

Father Charles Chiniquy, after spending 25 years as a Roman Catholic Priest in Canada and the United States, renounced the Roman Church and the priesthood and in the following paragraphs expressed his sense of humiliation and shame at having ever engaged in the process of the confessional.

 

With a blush on my face, and regret in my heart, I confess before God and man, that I have been through the confessional, plunged for 25 years in that bottomless sea of iniquity, in which the blind priests of Rome have to swim day and night. I had to learn by heart the infamous questions which the church of Rome forces every priest to learn. I had to put these impure, immoral questions to women and girls who were confessing their sins to me. Those questions, and the answers they elicit, are so debasing that only a man who has lost every sense of shame can put them to any women. Yes, I was bound in conscience, to put into the ears, the mind, the imagination, the memory, the heart and soul of women and girls, questions of such a nature, the direct and immediate tendency of which is to fill the minds and hearts of both priests and penitents with thoughts of temptations of such a degrading nature, that I do not know any words adequate to express them. Pagan antiquity has never seen any institution more polluting than the confessional. I have lived 25 years in the atmosphere of the confessional. I was degraded and polluted by the confessional just as all the priests of Rome are. It has required the whole blood of the great Victim, who died on Calvary for sinners, to purify me (pp. 67-68 in The Priest, Woman, and the Confessional).

 

Boettner continues,

 

This book by Charles Chiniquy is, we believe, the best available dealing with all phases of the confessional, and should be read by everyone who would have a clear understanding of the evils involved in that institution. It describes conditions which existed in Montreal and in other parts of Canada in the middle nineteenth century, and shows the depths to which the confessional tends if unrestrained by evangelical forces.

 

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CHRYSTIE, JAMES

Terms of Church Union and Communion
After having witnessed "Calvinists and avowed Arminians at the table of the Lord, under the influence of a disposition to esteem their differences of no importance," the author began to question his own loose views regarding terms of admission to the Lord's supper. This eventually led to this book. Not wanting to further increase a disunion among Christians, the author felt constrained to defend his principle for close communion with these words, "Whoever shall honour them with a pursual, will see that their principal object is to guard the truth of God's word from being surrendered, and the discipline of God's house from being laid aside, for the sake of promoting the shadow of a union among professing Christians ó a union which consists in being merely assembled in the same ordinance, without any hearty agreement in the truth, or any subjection to Christ, or any view to the promotion of real piety, individual or social." Promotes the necessity of agreement to faithful creeds and confessions, as prerequisites to unity and for partaking at the Lord's table. Deals with: the difference between essentials and non-essentials; which creeds are faithful; Calvin's and Augustine's views; and the arguments from Holy Scripture.
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CHURCH OF SCOTLAND GENERAL ASSEMBLY 1638-1649

The Acts of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland, From the Year 1638 to the Year 1649 Inclusive (1682)

 

Exceedingly rare, these are the acts from what many consider the greatest general assembly gatherings since the days of the apostles. The work accomplished and ratified at these meetings has been called "the most perfect model" of Presbyterial Church Government "as yet attained." Sitting during the momentous days of the Covenants (National and Solemn League) and the Westminster Assembly, this general assembly included the likes of Samuel Rutherford and George Gillespie. Judicially binding on covenanted Presbyterians (WCF 31:3), these Acts demonstrate how these godly leaders officially dealt with individual, family, ecclesiastical and civil Reformation (including national and international matters). Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that these rulings had major national and international ramifications in their day and that they still guide faithful Presbyterians at the close of the twentieth century (as terms of ministerial and Christian communion in the Reformed Presbyterian church). Moreover, they contain "noble examples to be followed in testifying against all corruptions embodied in the constitutions of either churches or states" (Reformed Presbytery, Act, Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 216). Christ's Kingship has never since been so boldly and clearly proclaimed to the nations by a duly constituted general assembly -- neither has His rule and reign been upheld and actually embodied into the laws of a nation (civil and ecclesiastical) as it was during these days in Scotland. Much of this can be attributed to the work (humanly speaking) done by the ministers present while these Acts were debated and passed. Regarding doctrine, worship, government and discipline there are few books that will be as helpful -- especially to elders and those advanced in the faith. Additionally, if you want a glimpse at the heart of the second Reformation this is one of the best places to look. It may also be considered "the eye of the Puritan storm," seeing that the Scottish Covenanters exerted such a godly influence among their English Presbyterian brothers (and the Westminster Assembly) during these days -- the two nations having covenanted with God (in the Solemn League and Covenant) for the international "reformation and defence of religion... the peace and safety of the three kingdoms... the glory of God, and the advancement of the kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, etc." Over 500 pages and indexed for easy reference to all major topics.

 

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CHURCH OF SCOTLAND

(Alexander Peterkin, editor)

The Book of the Universal Kirk of Scotland

 

Contains the earliest official records (acts and proceedings) of the Established Reformed Church in Scotland, covering the period from 1560 to 1616. Peterkin calls them "the only sure and satisfactory memorials of the course of Ecclesiastical affairs in the times immediately succeeding the Reformation." Lee, Clerk of the General Assembly in 1828 writes (regarding the originals), "there is no difficulty in proving that the volumes in question were laid on the table of the General Assembly which met at Glasgow in 1638; and that they were pronounced by that Assembly to be true and authentic Registers of the Kirk of Scotland." Concerning this copy of "The Booke" ("for the first time fully printed from the copies in the Advocates' Library"), Lee further states that these records exhibit, "the real character of the internal government of this national church. They display the operation of the principles by which the first Reformers and their immediate successors were actuated. They demonstrate that these men were not more distinguished by zeal for the truth, than by loyalty to the head of the government, attachment to true principles, (I do not say of toleration--for that was a term which they certainly did not employ or approve--of religious liberty and civil subordination. They bear testimony to the strictness and impartiality of ancient discipline. They vindicate the character of those illustrious men whose names have been unjustly aspersed, but who, both by their doctrine and lives,--by their unwearied exertions and their patient sufferings,--left an example, not indeed or faultless excellence, but assuredly of the most noble, magnanimous, and fearless adherence to the standards of our constitution. These Registers also contain much that is capable of correcting erroneous representations of historical facts with regard to the internal state of the kingdom -- institutions, habits, and customs, as well as the morals of the people, and the spirit which was most prevalent at particular periods in various districts of the land... they prove, that from the very first moment, it was the determined object of the leaders of the Reformation, to establish such a Presbyterian Government, as was at last, with the utmost difficulty completed... they deserve to be preserved with care, as the most venerable remnants of a distant age--as the earliest annuls of our infant church... of confessors and martyrs, who counted not their lives dear to them; and who when they thought it necessary, never shrunk from sealing their testimony with their blood... (they) present the seal and superscription of glory to God, and good will to man--peace to the church, and happiness to the state" (pp. xi-xii). John Knox, the first name listed in the first record of the first General Assembly (in 1560), of course, plays a prominent role in much of what is recorded here. 631 pages.

 

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CHURCH OF SCOTLAND GENERAL ASSEMBLY 1639

The Declinatour and Protestation of the Some Some-times Pretended Bishops, Presented in the Face of the Last Assembly. Refuted and Found Futile, But Full of Insolent Reproaches, and Bold Assertions (1639)
An exceedingly rare title marking the continuing rise, at a critical juncture, of the covenanted Reformed Presbyterian church. Members of this General Assembly and signatories to this protestation include Samuel Rutherford, David Dickson, Robert Baillie and even James Sharp (who later apostatized to the camp of the Prelatical antichrist and persecuted [and murdered] the covenanters he once owned as brothers). This book refutes the charges of the prelates, while exposing their many errors (which included teaching Arminianism, Popery, conditional election, the power of free-will resisting effectual grace, that the Pope is not the Antichrist, that Rome is the true church [constitutionally], that worship is not regulated by the Word of God [the regulative principle], that the earlier reformers were deformers; and denying limited atonement, justification by faith alone, predestination, and a number of other revealed truths of Scripture.)
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CLARKSON, ANDREW

Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting from the Revolution Church of Scotland. Also Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, and the Difference Betwixt the Reformation and Revolution Principles (1731)

An exceedingly rare and important book now back in print after 265 years! The Contending Witness magazine (May, 1841) described Plain Reasons "as the single best volume penned defending the principles of the second Reformation." It sets forth "the grounds why Presbyterian Dissenters refused to hold communion with the revolution church and state," (Reformed Presbytery, Act Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 154n). The biblical principles contained in this book still apply today and thus Plain Reasons remains one of the best books explaining why (and when) an individual (church or citizen) should separate himself (or itself) from those (in church or state) who do not hold fast to all the attainments of our covenanted Reformation forefathers. In this regard the session of the Puritan Reformed Church of Edmonton calls this the one book that best explains why faithful Covenanted Presbyterians must, for conscience sake, remain ecclesiastically separate from all Presbyterian denominations that have backslidden from second Reformation attainments. (This being the classic corporate Calvinistic application of such commands as "Nevertheless, whereto we have already attained, let us walk by the same rule, let us mind the same thing" [Phil. 3:16, emphasis added]. It is also the acknowledgement that the Lord has clearly stated in his Word that he "requireth that which is past" [Eccl. 3:15]).

Furthermore, the session of the PRC of Edmonton has noted that this book "clearly spells out the reasons why to unite with the Revolution Church (1689) or any of its descendants (The Free Church of Scotland, The Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, and American Presbyterian Churches) is to undermine and subvert the work of the Second Reformation. The argumentation is cogent (with an abundant supply of documentation). The reading can be divided up into 5-10 pages at a time. Reasons 8 and 9 (pp. 77-91) which speak to the issue of the covenants are very helpful, as is Reason 14 (pp. 138-140) which covers the matter of terms of communion. We might also highlight Clarkson's treatment of ecclesiastical dissent (pp. 172-221 wherein he discusses schism) and political dissent (pp. 221-280). This is the best apologetic we have read defending the necessity of Presbyterians to faithfully maintain the attainments of the Second Reformation" (emphasis added). Moreover, Clarkson's section on schism, separation and the nature of the visible church (constitutionally considered) contains over 10 pages of notes and quotes taken from numerous Reformers including: Beza, Rutherford, Gillespie, Dickson, Durham, M'Ward (Rutherford's disciple), Marshall, Watson, Cotton, Owen, Burroughs, Fraser, and Case -- demonstrating that his ideas regarding dissent from corrupt and backsliding civil or ecclesiastical governments are not new, but merely classic Reformation doctrine. The book also answers a multitude of pertinent and realistic objections in sections conveniently located directly after each reason for dissent.

Moreover, the days of the revolution settlement were a time of civil and ecclesiastical confusion not unlike our own day -- the beast (civil and ecclesiastical) was attempting to devour the "woman in the wilderness" by a cunning mixture of half-truths that were designed to beguile an exhausted and persecution-weary remnant. The consequences of the actions taken in these days, by both church and state "officials," have been amplified by time and apply directly to our contemporary civil and ecclesiastical situation ("That which hath been is now" [Eccl. 3:15]).

The Reformed Presbytery's Act, Declaration and Testimony (p. 47) further explains the original historical context -- so germane to the thesis of this book -- regarding those deceptively trying days which followed the "killing times" and final martyrs' death of that period of persecution (being the death of the covenanted Presbyterian minister James Renwick, who sealed his testimony with his blood February 17, 1688).

Of the so-called "glorious revolution of 1688" and the overthrow of the Royalist tyranny the Reformed Presbytery's measured and discerning comments read, "for in a few months, God in his righteous judgement and adorable providence, overturned that (Royalist--RB) throne of iniquity on which they (the persecuting popish, prelatical, Erastian, antichristian [civil and ecclesiastical] "authorities" which were then wondering after the beast--RB) depended, and expelled that inhuman, cruel monster (the duke of York--RB), from his tyrannical and usurped power, upon the Prince of Orange's (William of Orange--RB) coming over into England, in the beginning of November that same year (1688--RB). But although the Lord at this juncture, and by this means, rescued and delivered our natural and civil rights and privileges in a national way, from under the oppression and bondage of anti-christian tyranny, arbitrary and absolute power; yet the revolution, at this time, brought no real deliverance to the church of God; but Christ's rights (by these [rights--RB] are not meant the rights of Christ personal. It is not in the power of mortals, or any creature, to acquire and secure these to him; but the rights of Christ mystical, that is, of the church, or of his truth, true worship, and religion, and professors of it as such.), formerly acquired for him by his faithful servants, lay still buried under the rubbish of that anti-christian building of prelacy, erected on the ruins of his work in this land; and the spiritual liberties and privileges of his house remained, and do still remain under the bondage of Erastianism, supremacy, toleration, etc. For it is well known, that although this man (William of Orange--RB), Jehu-like, 'destroyed Baal out of Israel, yet he departed not from the sins of Jereboam, wherewith he made Israel to sin.'"

As a second witness to the testimony also given throughout Clarkson's Plain Reasons see pages 55 and following in the Act, Declaration and Testimony for more on "the grounds of the presbytery's testimony against the constitutions, both civil and ecclesiastical, at the late revolution, anno 1689; as also against the gross Erastianism and tyranny that has attended the administration both of church and state, since that memorable period; with various instances thereof, etc."

Since these momentous days Antichrist and his minions have sought to bury the covenanted Reformation and its attainments (upholding Christ's Kingship over both church and state) under the rubbish of democratic, humanistic, atheistic, tolerationism and a "detestable neutrality" in the cause of God and truth -- the same "detestable neutrality" so strongly inveighed against in the Solemn league and Covenant. Commenting on this defection from within professing Christendom, Clarkson writes, "It is also evident from this, that Schism from our covenanted Church consists in this, to wit, When the Members of the Church make Defection to the contrary part, that is in plain Terms, when they associate or incorporate with, assist and defend the Parties against whom the Covenant (Solemn League and Covenant--RB) was made and sworn, viz. Papists, Prelatist and their Underlings, Hereticks, &c. the common Enemies of Reformation; and fall from the Duties of Preserving and propagating the Reformation of the three Kingdoms; and refuse to join with, assist and defend those, who adhere to the Covenants, in the necessary Work of Renewing them, for Extirpation of Popery, Prelacy, Erastianism, Superstition, Heresy, Error and Profaneness, and whatsoever is contrary to sound Doctrine and the Power of Godliness; and for re-establishing, preserving, and propagating the covenanted Reformation, once happily established in these Lands, and sworn unto by our Covenants. Furthermore, Schism from our covenanted Church consists in this, viz, When Members, Ministers or others, give themselves to a detestable Indifferency and Neutrality, in the Cause of God, namely, in the preserving and propagating the covenanted Reformation of these three Kingdoms; that is to say, When Men are like so many Gallio's in the Cause of God, preferring worldly Ease, Honour and Wealth, their own Interest to the Interest of Christ, become easy, whether the covenanted Reformation in these Lands sink or swim; and, from a cowardly Disposition in some, and a malignant, perfidious Temper in others, coalesce and accord in apostatizing from the Articles of Covenant foresaid, the Cause of God, and its honest-hearted Friends; and frighted from both, as if they thought it both Sin and Shame to have it said, that they carried any warm Side to either the one or the other. I say, All Members of this National Church, who, on Account of any Combination, Persuasion, or Terror and Fear of worldly Loss, of Sufferings of whatsoever Kind, are guilty in any of these two Cases, are also guilty of making SCHISM from the covenanted Church, as is clearly manifest by the 6th Article of our Solemn Covenant" (pp. 182-184, , emphasis added).

Commenting on the common charge of schism leveled against those who would maintain the attainments of the covenanted Reformation, Clarkson writes: "Now, upon the whole of this Objection, as 'tis plain, Presbyterian Dissenters are not Schismatics, nor deserve to be so called; so 'tis a most groundless and shameless Reflection, to call them Separatists, tho' 'tis the ordinary Name of Epithet given them, especially in Print; yet to me, and I judge to many others, it is a Wonder with what Audacity, Men of Sobriety and Conscience should have the confidence to speak at such a Rate, unless they intend, in a desperate Humour, to render their Authority every where, amongst all sober persons, contemptible: For, if two Persons, walking upon a high Path-Road, on the Brink of a Puddle, the one of them by a Blast of Wind tumbling headlong into the Gulf; when weltering amidst the Glare and miery Clay, cries up to his Neighbor upon the Brink, Sir, unless you tumble over after me, I will look upon you as a Separatist: Which of the two are to be judged most insnared into the Course of Separation, whether the Person keeping the High-way, or the poor Man wallowing in the polluted Mire, Crying upon his Neighbour to unite with him in that his miserable Estate? Est solatium miseris habere socios doloris, ('Tis Comfort to Persons in Misery to have Companions.) Have not this present Church thrown themselves over into the Ditch of Pollution, in complying with these dreadful Apostates of this and the former times? And, shall these be judged Separatists, who dare not, who cannot, and may not in Conscience follow their Example? Can such as join with, and strengthen them, be able to purge themselves from the Guilt and Judgements, which accompany this shameful Defection? For an Union here (so much cried up) without Debate, is the Brotherhood of Simeon and Levi: It is an Union in the Course of Sin and Wrath, and not in Truth and Duty" (pp. 206-207, emphasis added).

For more of this strong tonic get the whole book -- it is one of the strongest and clearest calls that we have ever seen for the church to repent of its covenant-breaking and backsliding and return to its first love at the corporate level (covenantal and constitutional).

In short, Clarkson's Plain Reasons, contains the highest quality of Reformation thought regarding the subjects of which it deals. It is undoubtedly a major Reformation classic and should be studied by all those who are serious about seeing the destruction of the present tyranny (which is expressed in the modern civil and ecclesiastical Babylon erected by those that oppose the covenanted Reformation and the implementation of the Crown rights of King Jesus over the whole Earth!). 300 pages.

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http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PlainTOC.htm (Table of Contents)

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CLARKSON, DAVID

The Doctrine of Justification is Dangerously Corrupted in the Roman Church (1675, reprinted 1845)
Exposes the doctrinal sorcery of the mother of (spiritual) harlots. Should also serve as a warning to any who would compromise the everlasting truth of Scripture, for temporal gain, by joining themselves to the Romish whore, as many are doing in our day.
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CLARKSON, DAVID

Select Works of David Clarkson (1846)
Contains "Historical Notices of the Life and Writings of Clarkson" by Gertrude Clarkson along with Clarkson's "Treatises on the Church Polity of the Primitive Times." This treatise includes the following articles: "No Evidence for Diocesan Churches;" "Diocesan Churches Not Yet Discovered;" "Primitive Episcopacy Stated and Cleared from the Holy Scriptures and Ancient Records;" and "A Discourse Concerning Liturgies." Other works in this volume include"A Discourse of the Saving Grace of God" and the following miscellaneous sermons: "A Funeral Sermon for Dr. John Owen;" What Must Christians Do That the Influence of Ordinances May Abide Upon Them?;" and "The Doctrine of Justification is Dangerously Corrupted in the Roman Church." Indexed, 500 pages.
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CLARKSON, DAVID

Works of David Clarkson (3 volumes)

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The Classic Bible Dictionary

A Bible dictionary with Reformed leanings containing articles by Warfield, Fairbairn, Bonar and others. 1,120 pages.

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CLOSE, ALBERT

662 Priests Leave the Church of Rome

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COLES, ELISHA

God's Sovereignty, A Practical Discourse

A Puritan work recommended by Charles Spurgeon, John Owen, Thomas Goodwin and William Romaine. Owen, in particular, marvels at Coles' singular reliance on Scripture alone to vindicate God's sovereignty, as it relates to election, redemption, effectual calling, and the perseverance of the saints. Originally published in 1673, this is the 1831 edition. 298 pages.

 

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Cornwell, John

Hitler's Pope: The Secret History of Pius XII (1999)

 

The explosive untold story of the most dangerous churchman in modern history -- drawn from secret archives by an award-winning Roman Catholic journalist Eugenio Pacelli, Pius XII -- a man with unprecedented power for... evil... was pope from 1939 to 1958. Today, still shadowed by his failure to condemn Hitler's Final Solution, he is at the same time nearing canonization. Backed by new research and exclusive access to a wealth of Vatican and Jesuit archives, John Cornwell tells for the first time, in depth, the truth about Pacelli's long career as a Vatican diplomat and the accord between Pacelli and Hitler that helped sweep the Nazis to unhindered power. Hitler's Pope shows how Pacelli's entire life and career led to this, from a brilliant young Vatican lawyer drafting new papal power for the twentieth century to his 1933 Concordat with Hitler that muzzled protest by Germany's Catholic community, the most powerful in the world. Cornwell's explosive conclusion is that without Pacelli's contribution, Hitler might never have come to power or been able to press forward with the Holocaust... Hitler's Pope conclusively documents Pius XII's anti-Semitism, narcissism, and calamitous mix of political and spiritual ambition -- and it shows how many of Pacelli's policies are reasserting themselves today under the reign of John Paul II (Thomas Merton).

 

An useful book for documenting and exposing some of the more modern inner workings and wickedness of ecclesiastical Antichrist, though the author is still far to sympathetic with the Roman beast.

 

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PAISLEY, IAN R.K.

Rome, Hitler, Judas and the Jesuits
Documents the historic connection between Romanism and the Nazis. See also The Black Pope below.
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This message and more by Ian Paisley on free MP3s at http://www.sermonaudio.com/go/157

PAISLEY, IAN R.K.

The Black Pope and His Murdermen
Citing from their own secret documents, Paisley exposes the devilish work and deception of the Jesuits. From their founding by Ignatius of Loyola (to counteract the Reformation) to the modern devastation they have caused in each nation where they are allowed to operate, this order is seen to be one of Satan's great "angels of light" that deceive the unwary.
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This message and more by Ian Paisley on free MP3s at http://www.sermonaudio.com/go/157


COTTON, JOHN

The Bloudy Tenent, Washed, and Made White in the Bloud of the Lambe A reply to Roger Williams concerning liberty of conscience, civil rulers and their duty to uphold the first table of the law, etc.

 

Facsimile of 1647 edition. 338 pages.

 

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COTTON, JOHN

Singing of Psalms a Gospel Ordinance
An early American treatise wherein are handled four particulars concerning exclusive Psalmody: the duty itself, the matter to be sung, the singers and the manner of singing. This is a facsimile of 1647 edition.
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COLQUHOUN, JOHN

The Free Offer of the Gospel (c. 1840)
A 32 page easy-reading introduction to the topic of the free offer of the Gospel. Counteracts hyper-Calvinism and shows why Calvinists, of all people, should be motivated to preach the Gospel to all who will hear.
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COLQUHOUN, JOHN

Repentance
The author distinguishes between true repentance and legal repentance. Though the latter may be produced by a fear of God's wrath and lead to reformation of life, it is an experience which falls short of salvation. True repentance, on the other hand, is the result of the Holy Spirit's work in regeneration, is inseparable from faith in Christ, and is evidenced by turning from all sin unto God. The source, nature, necessity, fruits and evidences of Biblical repentance are also explored, providing an excellent corrective to the modern, superficial conception of conversion -- found among Arminians, Romnists, the cults and those promoting "easy believism."
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The Definition of the Council of Chalcedon (451) is available on all 30 Reformation Bookshelf CDs (in the "FREE BOOKS" file) at http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm (along with 100 other free books and articles on each CD!).


COULTIER, H.L. & B.L. FISHER               

A Shot in the Dark
Why the P in the DPT vaccination may be hazardous to your child's health. A chilling account of just how dangerous the whole-cell pertussis vaccine has proven to be, providing accurate research into the history of the vaccine's development and usage. It exposes the roles played by the FDA and the drug companies. It tells the tragic stories of young victims of the vaccine. "Builds a case that is cautious, credible, horrifying and outrageous all at once" noted the San Francisco Chronicle.
(Softcover) $24.95 - 40% = 14.97

COURTAS, JOHN

Frequency of the Lord's Supper (1797)
Argues that though weekly communion is most probably the Scriptural frequency of celebrating the Lord's Supper, pastoral care and a Godly sensitivity is in order as to this matter. Too frequent administration of this ordinance, with a congregations that is not "up to it," will bring judgement from God. Few books exist on this topic, and this one contains much wisdom for leaders in the church. Original titled: A Letter Addressed to the Community of Old Dissenters... Concerning the More Frequent Dispensing of the Lord's Supper.
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COVENANTED GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND

Directions of the General Assembly Concerning Secret and Private Worship, and Mutual Edification, For Cherishing Piety, For Maintaining Unity, and Avoiding Schism and Division (1647)
The title continues: "With An Act for observing these Directions, and for censuring such as use to neglect Family Worship. And An Act against such as withdraw themselves from the Public Worship in their own Congregations." 15 pages.
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COVENANTED GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND (Alexander Peterkin, editor)

Records of the Kirk of Scotland, Containing the Acts and Proceedings of the General Assemblies, From the Year 1638 Downwards, As Authenticated by the Clerks of Assembly; With Notes and Historical Illustrations, by Alexander Peterkin (1838 edition)

 

"The object of the present work is to present to the public, in a form that may be generally accessible, the history of one of the most interesting periods in the annals of our National Church, by the republication of the Acts and Proceedings, at, and subsequent to, the era of her second Reformation; and, combined therewith, such historical documents and sketches as are calculated to preserve the memory of an important, and, ultimately beneficial revolution," notes Peterkin in his introduction.

 

This is one of the most valuable publications we offer related to second Reformation history and the many important questions that were debated (and oftentimes settled) during this watershed period -- before, during and after the sitting of the Westminster Assembly. The interaction between the Scottish general Assembly and the Westminster Assembly is most fascinating and instructive -- affording many insights into the production and development of the Westminster Standards! It also contains some indispensable information on the Protester/Resolutioner controversy (which reveals many valuable lessons for Reformed Christians today), including excerpts from some lost books and papers written by the Protesting Covenanters. The excerpts from James Guthrie's The Waters of Sihor, or the Lands Defectione, in which Guthrie enumerates the errors of the Resolutioners, as well as the marks of malignancy, is one prime example. Other rare Protester documents (inveighing against the "pretended Assemblies" of the Resolutioners), signed by the likes of Samuel Rutherford and Robert Traill are also included. Very rare and very valuable -- a gold mine for the serious student of the covenanted Reformation! 684 pages.

 

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COVENANTED GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND

A Solemn Testimony Against Toleration and the Present Proceedings of Sectaries and their Abettors in England, in Reference to Religion and Government (1949-1650)
Here Cromwell, the Independents and the Sectarian Army of England are rebuked by the Scottish General Assembly for their covenant breaking, declension and hindering the work of Reformation. This book includes six separate documents, the final being "An Answer from the Committee of Estates to a Printed Paper Directed to the People of Scotland, and Signed in the Name of Cromwell and His Officers." Very rare!
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COVENANTED GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND & OTHERS

Various Official Acts, Declarations, Protestations, etc., Concerning the Covenanted Reformation
Contains 24 rare documents from the period 1638-1650. One document, "The Act of Covenant Renovation" (1880) by the Reformed Presbytery (which was a faithful renewal of the National Covenant and the Solemn League and Covenant [adapted to the present time], with a confession of public sins), is added from outside this period to illustrate the continuing obligations that rest upon the moral person (civilly and ecclesiastically). Among the seventeenth century documents we find much (from both the church and the state) that relates to the central place that covenanting played in the second Reformation. We also find various authoritative international testimonies against Popery, Prelacy and Schism (i.e. Independency, Cromwell, etc.), and for biblical covenanted uniformity, divine right Presbyterian church government, and apostolic worship. Military documents related to the second Reformation are also added. One proclamation by Charles I is even included, to illustrate Royalist opposition to Reformation. 686 pages.
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COVENANTED MINISTERS OF SCOTLAND

Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland (1880 edition)

 

This book (of 674 pages) records some of the most powerful sermons ever put into print, most being delivered during the "killing times" in Scotland. These faithful preachers were daily in danger of losing their earthly lives for their testimony to the truth of Christ's kingship (which they proclaim here) -- and many were eventually martyred for His covenanted cause. The original title of this book, instructive in itself, reads (in part), "A Collection of Lectures and Sermons Preached upon Several Subjects, Mostly in the Time of the Late Persecution. Wherein a Faithful Doctrinal Testimony is Transmitted to Posterity for the Doctrine, Worship, Discipline and Government of the Church of Scotland against Popery, Prelacy, Erastianism, etc.... and a Sermon on the Breach of Covenant by Mr. John Guthrie." Each set of sermons in this book is prefaced with a helpful three to six page biographical notice. The following ministers are included (with the number of their sermons in this book noted in parentheses after their name): William Guthrie (17); Michael Bruce (3); John Weldwood (4); Richard Cameron (7 sermons and 1 lecture); Donald Cargill (7 sermons and 3 lectures); Alexander Peden (2); Alexander Shields (2 sermons and 1 lecture); John Livingstone (1 sermon and 1 sacramental discourse); John Welch (1 sermon and 1 sacramental discourse); John Guthrie (1). Includes illustrations and the original preface (written March 19, 1779) by John Howie (author of Biographia Scoticana, or The Scots Worthies). An instructive and useful commemorative sermon, "A Third Reformation Necessary: or, The Piety, Principles, and Patriotism of Scotland's Covenanted Martyrs; With Application to the Present Times," by Kerr, preached on the bi-cententary of the covenanting struggle, is also included. Contains some of the most soul stirring preaching you may ever read!

 

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The Fellowship of Christ's Sufferings by Alexander Peden, which is one of the free sermons from this book, can be accessed directly at http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=93020483. Click on the "List entire series" link to view other free sermons from Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland.


COVENANTED REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN PUBLISHING

The Best of "The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness" Magazine.
Probably the best Christian magazine available today. Their reprinting of old Presbyterian writers, and selections from well-known Reformers is unsurpassed. Includes much material not available anywhere else. A delight for those sold out for the truth and for all who love faithful, "no punches pulled" literature. With permission, we have selected a number of articles as a good representative sample of this work and bound them together in 290 pages.
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"The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness" Magazine for all 1993 (551 pages)
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"The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness" Magazine for all 1994 (551 pages)
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"The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness" Magazine for all 1995 (551 pages)
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COVENANTER MAGAZINE

The Right of Dissent from an Immoral Civil Government
Maintains the Covenanter position, the great principle of dissent and separation from immoral civil governments. Argues that mere existence does not qualify a civil government as "the ordinance of God" (Romans 13:2). Answers common objections to this position, including how Joseph, Nehemiah and Daniel could hold office under immoral civil governments. Willson's book, Civil Government
, and Samuel B. Wylie's softcover book Two Sons of Oil: or, The Faithful Witness For Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis (softcover), both give much lengthier defenses of this position.
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This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 26 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm


COVENANTER (ENGLISH, UNKNOWN)
Covenant Renouncers, Desperate Apostates (1665)

In these two letters "written by a Christian friend to Mr. William Gurnal" we have "some account how zealous Mr. Gurnal was (once--RB) for that (Solemn League and--RB) Covenant which he has now renounced" and "an appendix concerning the Church of England in general." The author warns against the grievous sin of covenant breaking (i.e. violating the third commandment) and the closely related sin of occasional hearing (i.e. attending upon the public ministry of covenant breakers). The title page notes that this book was "Printed in Anti-turn-coat-street, and sold at the sign of Truths-delight, right opposite to Back-sliding-alley." 35 pages.

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COVENANTER (ENGLISH, UNKNOWN)
The Covenanter's Catechism (1644)

A rare gem printed shortly after the subscribing of the Solemn League and Covenant and written during the sitting of the Westminster Assembly. The sub-title reads: "A Brief and Familiar Analysis and Exposition of the (Solemn League--RB) and Covenant. First Delivered in Sundry Sermons to a Particular Congregation and Now Resolved Into Questions and Answers for the More Public Good." Printed at London, it deals with covenanting in general as well as the specifics of the Solemn League and Covenant, article by article. 30 pages.

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CREATION VIDEOS (397cat.)

 (As with all the resources we distribute we do not endorse any heresy [such as Arminianism, Premillennialism, Tolerationism, etc.] which may be contained in them. Portions of such heresies may be found on some of these videos.) Age of the Earth, $29.95 Answers About Creation, $29.95 Creation the Flood & the Ice Age, $29.95 Dinosaurs and the Bible, $29.95 Evolution & the Textbooks, $39.95 Evolution Conspiracy, $29.95 Evolution the Foundation for Communism $29.95 Fingerprints of Creation, $29.95 Fossil Evidence of Creation, $29.95 Grand Canyon Catastrophe (New Evidence of the Genesis Flood), $29.95 Leviathan the Fire Breathing Dragon, $29.95 Science, Creation and the Bible, $29.95 A Scientist Looks at Creation, $29.95 Young Age of the Earth, $29.95

CREATION VIDEO

Biological Evidence of Creation "From a Frog to a Prince" (1998)
"Compelling new evidence that life on earth could not have been created by random forces... A kiss from a princess can't turn a frog into a prince, yet evolutionists claim that ancestral amphibians did change into people just by chance and natural selection. But such major biological change needs new information: where could it come from? At Oxford University, a prominent defender of Darwinian evolution, Dr. Richard Dawkins, says the selective accumulation of lucky mutations can explain it. This view is challenged by biophysicist Dr. Lee Spetner in Israel, and by molecular biologist Dr. Michael Denton in New Zealand. Dr. Michael Gitt, and information scientist, explains that evolutionary process cannot produce new information. And in Australia, biologist Dr. Don Batten shows there are clear limits to biological change; frogs will always breed frogs" (from outside video case). A colorful, professionally produced video.
(Video) $29.95


CROSKERY, THOMAS

Plymouth-Brethrenism: A Refutation of Its Principles and Doctrines (1879)
A one-of-a-kind work written from the Reformed perspective. The author notes, "I deem it right to state that I attribute to the Brethren no doctrines they do not hold, that I give ample quotations from their works, fairly representing all their opinions, and that I confine myself strictly to the business of refuting their arguments from Scripture. I have followed Hodge, the American divine, closely, almost verbally, in my treatment of the true doctrine of the Church and its unity."
(Rare bound photocopy) $39.95-50%=$19.98 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $34.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 24 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CRAIGHEAD, ALEXANDER

Renewal of the Covenants, National and Solemn League; A Confession of Sins; An Engagement to Duties; and a Testimony; as they were Carried on at Middle Octorara in Pennsylvania, November 11, 1743 (1748)
A fascinating Covenanter document proclaiming that "[t]o the Calvinistic system of principles, and the Presbyterian form of government, this nation (the United States) is largely indebted for its civil independence and republican polity. John Calvin and John Knox are the real founders of American liberties. Their teachings, plainly deducible from the Word of God, were disseminated by the persecuted remnant of the Church of Scotland, and were generally incorporated in the structure of American independence." Furthermore, Glasgow, in his introduction, points out that Craighead's covenanting work formed a basis for the national Declaration of Independence, which followed shortly thereafter. "For seven years Mr. Craighead labored among the Covenanter societies; but failing to receive assistance from Scotland, he removed, in 1749, to Virginia, thence to Mecklenberg County, North Carolina. There he became identified with the Presbytery in connection with the Presbyterian Church. Being thoroughly imbued, however, with the principles of the Scotch Covenanters, Mr. Craighead taught them to his people around Charlotte. They in turn formulated them into the First Declaration of Independence, emitted at Charlotte, NC, May, 1775. According to a reliable author (Wheeler's Reminiscences, p. 278) Thomas Jefferson says in his autobiography that when he was engaged in preparing the National Declaration of Independence, that he and his colleagues searched everywhere for formulas, and that the printed proceedings of Octorara, as well as the Mecklenburg Declaration, were before him, and that he freely used ideas therein contained. It is difficult to determine, therefore, the real author of American Independence. Undoubtedly the principles of the Covenanters at Octarara in 1743, the sentiments of the Presbyterians at Charlotte in 1775, and the Declaration submitted by Jefferson in 1776, contain one and the same great principles. 'Honor to whom honor is due.'" However, Glasgow also reports, "[h]ence the Declaration of American Independence was justifiable. But when the newly-born nation ignored the God of battles, rejected the authority of the Prince of the kings of the earth, and refused to administer the government in accordance with the requirements of the Divine Law, then the same loyal Covenanters, faithful to their principles and consistent with their history through all the struggles of the centuries, dissented from the Constitution of the United States, and are justifiable in the continuance of this position of political dissent so long as the government retains its character of political atheism. We may rightfully declare our independence of wicked men and rebellious nations, but we cannot declare our independence of God, and set up a government regardless of His authority, without incurring His wrath and suffering from His desolating judgements. 'Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord.'" This rare book contains much that is exceedingly valuable and the section titled "The Declaration, Protestation, and Testimony of a Suffering Remnant of the Anti-Popish, Anti-Lutheran, Anti-Prelatic, Anti-Erastian, Anti-Latitu-dinarian, Anti-Sectarian, True Presbyterian Church of Christ, in America," is well worth the price of the book itself. With Glasgow, we set this book forth "[t]rusting that his work will be of historical value to all Covenanters, and interesting to all other readers," with the hope of "enkindling a flame of love for the glorious principles of the Word of God, and arousing an interest in the great work of National Reformation."
(Rare bound photocopy) $4.99

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 27 (CD SUPER SALE) at: http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm

CUDWORTH, WILLIAM

Aphorisms Concerning the Assurance of Faith
The title continues: "Designed to Reconcile Differing Sentiments on that Important Point; and Free Salvation Defended, and Several Common Objections Answered." 25 pages.
(Bound photocopy) $2.99 (US funds)

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CULVERWEL, NATHANAEL

An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature (1652)
Same as the item listed below, except taken from the original 1652 edition (without the articles and prefaces added to the later edition) and including eight of the author's shorter treatises. The extra works found only in this edition include: "The Schisme;" "The Act of Oblivion;" "The Child's Return;" "The Panting Soul;" "Mount Ebal;" The White Stone: or, A Learned and Choice Treatise of Assurance: Very Useful for all, but especially weak Believers;" "Spiritual Opticks: or A Glass Discovering the Weakness and imperfection of a Christian's Knowledge in this life;" "The Worth of Souls." 450 pages.
(Bound photocopy) $99.95-75%=24.99

(Hardcover photocopy) $34.00 (US funds)

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CULVERWEL, NATHANAEL

Of the Light of Nature (1652, 1862 edition)

 

"The work here reprinted is chiefly remarkable on three grounds, as a literary curiosity, as a monument of philosophical genius, and as a masterly discussion of the subject of which it treats, hardly surpassed in the course of British Ethics," write Cairns in his critical essay prefaced to this volume. Moreover, Cairns continues by calling this book a "series of most important utterances upon all the fundamental questions of philosophy and theology... the theory of knowledge, the theory of conscience, and the theory of faith."

 

John Brown, in his preface, notes that "the design of the Discourse of the Light of Nature was, on the one hand to vindicate the use of reason, in matters of religion." Furthermore, Brown calls Culverwel "a decided Parliament-man, and a friend of the Solemn League and Covenant," and speaks of his "Calvinism, Puritanism, and deep spiritual religion." He also calls him "a man of genius, learning, eloquence, and piety." This is a classic Puritan resource for anyone interested in advanced ethics, epistemology or a myriad of other pressing questions related to God's law and philosophy. 353 pages, indexed.

 

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CUNNINGHAM, JOHN

The Church History of Scotland (2 volumes, 1859)

Chronicles the period from the commencement of the Christian era to the nineteenth century. In fact, Cunningham's first chapter begins with Druids in Scotland at the time that "the Great Founder of our Faith was preaching the gospel of the kingdom in the cities of Galilee." Concerning the scope of this set Cunningham writes,


Our best Scottish Histories are confined to particular periods. Indeed, so far as I know , there is not one which will conduct the student from the epoch of Christianity to the day in which he lives. This is the task I have undertaken; but in traversing this long tract of time I have naturally lingered longest on those periods which are either most interesting or most instructive.


The importance of this title is seen in the following comments,


The Reformation in Scotland was certainly very complete -- in no other country in the world was it so complete...
Though Scotland presents but a narrow field, yet the ecclesiastical element has there had a fuller and freer development than in any other country. What Egypt is to the man who would ransack ancient temples and tombs, Scotland is to the man who would study the manifestations of ecclesiastical life... In truth, the Church of Scotland has had within Scotland a history similar to what the Church of Rome has had within Christendom. We see the same laws in operation, though on a smaller scale, and under modifying circumstances. In the career of the one we can discern the blessings which flow from a pure creed and simple worship, and in that of the other the blighting effects of a baneful superstition; but with both there has been the same union and energy of action, the same assumption of spiritual supremacy, the same defiance of law courts, parliaments, and kings. The history of either can be traced with equal precision, sometimes blending with civil history, but at other times diverging widely from it. I know only three Churches whose histories stand thus prominently out -- the Jewish, the Roman, and the Scottish. Geneva had such a Church too, but it was only for a very little season.


1209 pages, indexed.

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CUNNINGHAM, JOHN

The Ordinance of Covenanting (1843)

This book (of over 400 pages) is considered by many as the classic work on covenanting. Here Cunningham exhaustively deals with the manner, duty and nature of covenanting (including personal and social covenanting), the obligation covenanting confers, how covenanting is provided for in the everlasting covenant, how it is adapted to the moral constitution of man and how it is according to the purposes of God. If you are interested in the ordinance of covenanting this is the most extensive treatment you will find in one book. It is a gold mine of Scriptural references and should be read at least once by everyone who calls upon the name of Christ. A rare and valuable classic!

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This book is also free online in MP3 (audio) format beginning at http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=8605114244 under the title "Covenants & Covenanting."


CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

Church and State: The Biblical View
A compilation of articles from some of the best Christian minds in history, including Cunningham, Smeaton, M'Crie, Symington, Gillespie, the Westminster Divines, Bannerman, Owen, and Shaw. This book shows that, generally speaking, the leaders of the Reformed faith have all come to substantial agreement regarding what the Scriptures teach about Christ's Kingship over the nations and the Church. Establishmentarianism is clearly seen to be the historically Reformed consensus, and this has a huge impact on the way one views both the Church and the state, in relation to Scripture. Much eschatology is also mingled in with the teaching on church and state. Portions of these sections deal with some of the most encouraging promises from God that you will ever read/hear (as related to the victory that is prophesied to come in history, before the bodily return of the Lord Jesus Christ).
(Rare bound photocopy) $59.95-75%=$14.99 (US funds)

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Free audio (MP3) of this book starts at: http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=72802135251


CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

Historical Theology: A Review of the Principal Doctrinal Discussions in the Christian Church Since the Apostolic Age (2 Volumes)

 

Two large volumes totalling just under 1300 pages. The definitive work on doctrinal history. Compares the truth to the three major heretical system: Romanism, Socinianism (an old form of liberalism) and Arminianism. Covers the most important disputes, focusing in on significant points of controversy in each. The value of this set should not be underestimated, for it is an antidote against much of the innovative folly so prevalent in our day. As Iain Murray, concerning human pride and scriptural interpretation, succinctly points out,

 

Instead of beginning with a realization that God in His providence had already caused His Church to investigate and settle at least the great majority of Biblical doctrines, the Church, flattered by the supposed possession of superior light, began to despise the old doctrinal standards and to construct a 'creed' anew, as though the faith of the previous eighteen centuries counted for nothing. Nor were the evangelicals free from this plague; even they took up the slogans that 'Christianity is not a doctrine but a life' and that to express the truth systematically is an abuse of logic -- as though to think illogically was a mark of true spirituality!

 

J.J. Bonar stated that Cunningham's "grasp and vantage of the field of theological discussion" was "of inestimable value." This set is certainly one of the most useful items we carry and is much needed in our day.

 

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A sample from this book, "Apostolic Presbyterianism," is also available on all 30 Reformation Bookshelf CDs (in the "FREE BOOKS" file) at http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm (along with 100 other free books and articles on each CD!) -- and free on the web at http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/ApoPresby.htm.


CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

Discussions on Church Principles: Popish, Erastian and Presbyterian (1863)

 

"Cunningham exhausts his subject... books like this one will be a tremendous help," notes Credenda Agenda magazine (vol. 6/#3 -- the irony of this statement will be obvious to anyone who understands what Cunningham teaches in this book and compares it with much that is found in Credenda Agenda magazine today).

 

This was originally volume four in Cunningham's Works, which also included Historical Theology and The Reformers and the Theology of the Reformation (both available at http://www.swrb.com/catalog/c.htm ). Iain Murray writes that "in the days of Cunningham and Bannerman, New College, Edinburgh, rose to be the finest theological college in Europe." This book is a good example why. It exposes Romanism, which Cunningham called "the masterpiece of Satan," spiritual tyranny, false views of the church's place and power, innovative worship (contrary to the regulative principle of worship -- Rome's specialty!), and much more! Indexed, 589 pages.

 

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CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

John Calvin
As Cunningham states, "John Calvin was by far the greatest of the Reformers with respect to the talents he possessed, the influence he exerted, and the services he rendered in the establishment and diffusion of important truth." Here we have a succinct account of Calvin's works and the leading principles that he maintained. Calvin is without a doubt one of the great men in all of human history, and as he often pointed out, he owed everything to the Lord Jesus Christ all his talents, all his influence, his very salvation, etc. for that is the nature of "Calvinism," giving God all the glory!
(Rare bound photocopy) $4.99 (US funds)

(Hardcover photocopy) $19.00 (US funds)

This book is also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD volume 30 at:
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CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

Leaders of the Reformation (1860)
"The Reformation from Popery in the sixteenth century was the greatest event, or series of events, that has occurred since the close of the Canon of Scripture; and the men who are really entitled to be called the 'Leaders of the Reformation' have a claim to more respect and gratitude than any other body of uninspired men that have ever influenced or adorned the church," says Cunningham. This book explains why this is so.
(Rare bound photocopy) $4.99 (US funds)

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CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

The Reformers and the Theology of the Reformation
A full, sound and judicious volume. Covers, in 615 pages, the major "movers and shakers" of the Reformation, as well as their teaching and the amazing results that followed. Assurance, the Sacraments, and Arminianism are all dealt with, plus much more. Cunningham was Professor of Church History at New College in Edinburgh and committed to his colleagues, James Buchanan and James Bannerman, the Manuscripts for this work shortly before his death. His love for Reformation studies can be seen in the following quotation: "The Reformation from Popery in the sixteenth century was the greatest event, or series of events, that has occurred since the close of the Canon of Scriptures; and the men who are really entitled to be called the 'Leaders of the Reformation' have a claim to more respect and gratitude than any other body of uninspired men that have ever influenced or adorned the church." Some of the articles contained in this volume continue to be recognized as landmark studies in the theology of the Reformation.
(Hardcover) $59.95 (US funds)

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

Sermons (of Cunningham) from 1828 to 1860
When J.J. Bonar had these sermons published in 1872 he wrote, "How far a volume, with nothing in it but the pith of Genevan Doctrine, - with nothing but the unrevised Bible and the worn-out Truth, - the obsolete Gospel and the Common Salvation, - will be appreciated or borne with in this day of contemptuous revolt from all that used to be most firmly held by the Churches, it is not easy to predict; or rather, it is too easy. Dr. Cunningham, for the splendor that surrounds his name, may get recognition; but with his Sacrificial Theology, and Forensic Justification, and Regenerative Grace, and Definite Election, it would be vain to expect that he will find a cordial welcome. It is the palatable in creed, and the brilliant in speculation, which all men are now going after as in the madness of idolatry." An intensely practical and theologically precise collection.
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CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM

The Westminster Confession on the Relation Between Church and State (1843)
Chapter eight excerpted from Discussions on Church Principles. Answers the false claims that the Westminster Divines contradicted themselves on this issue and/or that they were Erastians. Proves that changes made to the original Westminster Confession, concerning church and state issues, were in error - clearly demonstrating why this is so.
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