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TOUCH THE FIRE!

CALVINISTIC QUOTES

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INDEX OF ITEMS


Anabaptists Versus Romanists Versus Reformers
Authority
"Bad News" for Pessimillennialists
Blessing of Controversy, The
Books
Calvin and Controversy
Calvin on Images
Calvin on Separation from False Worship
Calvin the Theocrat
Calvinism
Capitalism and Abundance
Catholic Church, The
Chief End of Man, The
Christian Warfare
Civil Government
Common Grace
Covenanting and the One True Religion
Crime of Tolerance, The 
Culture of Death, The 
Curse of Antinomianism, The
Education
Family
Family Worship
Free and Unchangeable Ordination
Further Study Concerning Worship
Gary North on Dave Hunt
Gillespie on Christmass Keeping and More
Gillespie on Unlawful Ceremonies and Monuments of By-Past Idolatry
God's Law
Government Control and Government Money
Grace and the Atonement 
Great Unwanted Blessing, The
Greatest Commandment, The 
Hell Fire
Holiness, Unity and Truth
Homosexual Movement, The
How to Respond to Satan
Iconoclasm
I Desire Books
Idolatry
Kings, Covenanting and Christ
Knox on Christmass Keeping
Knox on Man-made Ceremonies
Last Days, The
Law
Law and Punishment
Law, Liturgy and Lordship
Life Unto Life, Death Unto Death
Man the Economic Animal?
Mark of the Beast, The
Marriage 
Messiah the Prince
Monster of Toleration, The
Notes on Covenanting
Occult Interpretation of Scripture
Pagans and Politics
Politics Fourth?
Preaching Christ Crucified
Providence of God, The 
Psalm One
Psalm Singing
Repentance
Repentance Unto Life
Road to Victory, The
Second Greatest Commandment, The
Separate from False Churches
Separating from the Tyranny of False Worship
Socialism Brings Famine
Sproul on Presuppositionalism
Spurgeon on Christmass Keeping
Spurgeon on Christ's Love
Spurgeon on Eschatology
Syncretism
That's Life
True Liberty of Conscience
United States Government Against Pornography, Abortion & Contraceptives, The
Was Calvin a Theonomist?
Where are the Lord's Enemies?
Westminster Divines and Covenanted Uniformity, The 
Westminster Divines on Holy-Days, The
Westminster Divines on Worship, The

Many unordered quotations follow the last listed item above.




The Anabaptists Versus the Romanists Versus the Reformers

Rome makes the church ultimate, the Anabaptists make the conscience
ultimate and the Reformers made the Word of God ultimate. From: The Sufficiency of Scripture (cassette sermon) by Greg Price. Authority By father and mother, in the fifth commandment, are meant, not only natural parents, but all superiors in age and gifts; and especially such as, by God's ordinance, are over us in place of authority, whether in family, church, or commonwealth. (Westminster Larger Catechism [1648], Answer 124) "Bad News" for Pessimillennialists Luke 18:8 has often been, but most erroneously, cited to show that when the Lord comes there will be no saints,-in other words no Church. In the English version the words are made interrogative: "Shall He find faith?" The answer these theorists give is, "No." This interrogative sense has no other foundation than the adverb ara. This occurs fifty-four times in the New Testament, of which only three ap pear as interrogatives in our English version. The word de notes an inference, and means "truly, certainly, indeed," etc. (Dunb., Schl., Park.). When interrogation appears, it de pends on some other particles. Though Greek editors have been bold enough to print the verse with a Greek note of in terrogation, English readers should remember that no points are used in the original codices. And here it should most decidedly not be admitted, as being unsupported, and teaching a false doctrine,-the defectibility of the Lord's Church. The particle ara is affirmative, the sentence is af firmative, and the previous context requires an affirmative in the place, "When the Son of man comes, He shall indeed find faith on the earth," for He shall hear the prayers of His elect.1 1. Glasgow, James. The Apocalypse Translated and Expounded (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1872), p. 507n. Available exclusively, in bound photocopy format, from SWRB for $20 postpaid. Also, write: SWRB 4710-37A Ave. Edmonton AB Canada T6L 3T5, for our complimentary catalogue carrying Reformed books, cas settes, videos, tracts, etc. at discount prices. Blessing of Controversy, The It holds almost universally in the history of the church, that until a doctrine has been fully discussed in a controversial way by men of talent and learning taking opposite sides, men's opinions regarding it are generally obscure and indefinite, and their language vague and confused, if not contradictory. (Cunningham's Historical Theology [I, 179], cited in the Journal for Christian Reconstruction: Symposium on Puritanism and Law, p. 48) Books By means of Christian literature you can introduce others to the gospel. books can go where you cannot go, and (sometimes just as important!) books can stay where you have already outstayed your welcome. If you leave a book with someone, it will remain with them when you have left. (Ferguson, Read Any Good Books? [BOT, 1992], p. 6) CALVINISM It is our intention to show that the historical faith of the Christian Church is that system of theology which has commonly been known as Calvinism. And that it is the only system of truth which is consistent with the Word of God. Charles Spur geon writes: I have my own private opinion that there is no such thing as preaching Christ and Him crucified, unless we preach what is nowadays called Calvin ism. It is a nick name to call it Calvinism; Calvinism is the Gospel, and noth ing else. I do not believe we can preach the gospel...unless we preach the sovereignty of God in His dispensation of grace...unless we exalt the electing, unchangeable, eternal, immutable, con quering love of Jehovah; nor do I think we can preach the gospel unless we base it upon the special and particular redemption of His elect and chosen people which Christ wrought out upon the cross; nor can I comprehend a gospel which lets saints fall away after they are called.4 We confess with this great Baptist theologian, that there can be no true presenta tion of the gospel if it is not set forth in the purity of the Word of God. It is our contention that any compromise of Calvinism is a step towards human ism. It is highly probable that the impoverishing of the twentieth cen tury church, and society in turn, is due to the fact that the doctrines of sound, biblical Calvinism have not been preached. Arminianism, as a creedal system, stands as the avant-garde of the present day church; it is a serious deviation from biblical Christianity. The results of its proclamations are noticeable. Loraine Boettner observes: We are living in a day in which practically all of the historic churches are be ing attacked from within by unbelief. Many of them have already suc cumbed. And most invariably the line of descent has been from Calvinism to Arminianism, from Armini anism to Liberalism, and then to Unitarianism. And the history of Liberalism and Unitarianism shows that they deteriorate into a social gospel that is too weak to sustain itself. We are convinced that the future of Christianity is bound up with that system of theology histori cally called "Calvinism." Where the God-centered principles of Calvinism have been abandoned, there has been a strong tendency downward into the depths of man-centered naturalism or secularism. Some have declared, rightly, we believe, that there is no consistent stopping place between Calvinism and atheism.5 Ken Talbot, Calvinism, Hyper Calvinism & Arminianism. (Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, 1990), pp. 2-3. 1. Spurgeon, Charles. Spurgeon's Sovereign Grace Sermons (Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, reprint 1990) pp. 129-130. See SWRB catalogue page 24, this title is now 50% off. 2. Boettner, Loraine. The Reformed Faith (Presbyterian and Reformed Publ., [1983] seventh printing 1989), p. 2. See catalogue page 23, this title now 35% off. Calvin and Controversy From the Preface to the long awaited forth coming second (revised) edition of Michael Bushell's Songs of Zion (Crown and Covenant Publications, 1993). An attempt has been made to remove some of the more caustic statements in the book. There is great wisdom in the many scriptural warnings against un necessary polemics. "A soft answer turneth away wrath: but grievous words stir up anger (Prov. 15:1)." This is a lesson that is learned with diffi culty and easily forgotten, espe cially in the midst of controversy. If the basic thesis of this book is correct, then there is no way to camouflage the fact that it represents a serious indictment of the worship practice of the vast majority of Reformed churches in this country. But there simply must be a way for discussion on the subject to proceed without the rancor that so often accompa nies it. Godly men can disagree even over im por tant is sues that are taught clearly in Scripture. I have thought much over the years about the fact that Calvin and Melancthon (Luther's pro tege) were such close companions. Those who are famil iar with the life of Calvin will know that a relationship existed between Calvin and Melancthon that was little different in kind from that which ex isted be tween David and Jonathan. Calvin wept bitterly when his friend died. And yet Melancthon's views on freewill and predestination were close in many ways to what would later be called Arminianism. His writings did profound damage to the cause of truth in the Lutheran wing of the Reformation. But in spite of that fact he and Calvin were the closest of friends and brethren in Christ. Calvin never hesitated to defend the cause of truth or to heap invectives upon the enemies of God. But he knew the difference between an enemy of the Lord and a child of God who happens to have a blind spot in one area of biblical truth. It is a difference that we need very much to keep in mind, especially in the case presently before us in this book. It is a matter of some grief to me that there have been times in my life when I lost sight of that distinction. But it is very easy to do and we must be on guard against it, especially when dealing with subjects about which we feel very strongly. Calvin on Images Calvin's argument is that there is no such thing as an "innocent" religious image. Their acceptance alone is an act of idolatry, so that as soon as images appear, religion is corrupted and adulterated. (Eire in War Against the Idols [p. 226], Institutes II.8.17 Calvin on Separation from False Worship
In 1550, Calvin proudly wrote to Melancthon: "many, in order to avoid idolatry, are fleeing France and are coming to us in voluntary exile."1 Calvin often refers to idolatry as if were a plague: Once an area becomes infected with this virus, the only way the residents can escape contagion is by fleeing. Those who remain behind, surrounded by the disease, risk infection every day as long as they come into contact with its victims. Calvin was aware that not everyone was free to emigrate, but he continually stressed that for those who found it possible, it was the wisest course to follow:
Now, consider whether you can have peace with God and
your own conscience while you persevere in your present state . . . We
have no direct revelation commanding us to leave the country, but since
we have the commandment to honor God in body and soul, wherever we
may be, what else could we do? It is certainly to us, then, that these words
are also addressed, 'Get thee out of thy country and from thy kindred'
[Gen. 12:1]; as long as we are there constrained to act against our
conscience, and cannot live for the glory of God.2

Calvin adds that one should regard as "filth and dung" everything which 
hinders one from being a good Christian; if anything separates one from 
God, who is the true life, then it can only lead to death.3



(Carlos Eire, War Against the Idols: The Reformation of Worship from Erasmus to Calvin [Cambridge University Press, 1990], pp. 260-261)
Footnotes: 1. Corpus Reformatorum: Joannis Calvini Opera quae supersunt omnia (CR hereafter), edited by W. Baum, E. Cunitz, and E. Reuss (Brunswick, 1863-80), 6.576. Also CR 55.280, CR 45.770. 2. CR 11.629-30 3. "Quatrieme Sermon," CR 8.437.
CALVIN THE THEOCRAT "...And I hope with me you are a THEOCRAT be cause Calvin was and if you don't have the courage to call yourself a THEOCRAT, then I hope that you will have the honesty to quit call ing yourself a CALVINIST!" - From the cassette The Fifth Commandment by Dr. F. Nigel Lee Capitalism and Abundance When godly business activity is left unhampered, and men devote themselves to glorifying God through developing the earth's productive potential, obeying His laws and caring for the needy, remembering that God gives the power to get wealth, He will open the windows of heaven for them, causing the earth to yield its fruit in astonishing abundance. (Chilton, Productive Christians... p. 202) The Catholic Church The catholic (i.e. universal-RB) Church hath been sometimes more, sometimes less visible. And particular Churches, which are members thereof, are more or less pure, according as the doctrine of the Gospel is taught and embraced, ordinances administered, and public worship performed more or less purely in them. (The Westminster Confession of Faith [1647], ch. 25:4) THE CHIEF END OF MAN Q. What is the chief end of man? A. Man's chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy him forever. (Westminster Shorter Catechism [1648], Question 1) Christian Warfare When principles that run against your deepest convictions begin to win the day, then battle is your calling, and peace has become sin; you must, at the price of dearest peace, lay your convictions bare before friend and enemy, with all the fire of your faith. (Abraham Kuyper cited in Farrar, Steve Standing Tall: How A Man Can Protect his Family [Multnomah, 1994], p. 113) There is not a square inch of ground in heaven or on earth or under the earth in which there is peace between Christ and Satan... If you say that you are "not involved" you are involved in Satan's side. If you say you are involved in the struggle... in the area of the family and in the church, but not in the school, you are deceiving yourself. (Rushdoony in Philosophy of Christian Education citing Van Til from Essays on Christian Education, p. 26.) CIVIL GOVERNMENT CONSIDERED A MORAL PERSON BEFORE GOD "It will be necessary, before proceeding far ther, to lay down some positions of a more gen eral na ture as they are pre-supposed or come to light in every in stance of Church Establishment. I shall do little more than state them as funda men tal postu lates, and I may the sooner come to what is more peculiarly Scottish. The propriety of Ecclesiastical Establishments may be advocated briefly as follows: The State, considered in its corporate character, is a MORAL PERSON, with a moral stand ing and responsibility. It is not the cre ation of the so-called social compact or of the popular will, but a divine institution based on natural religion. It co heres by a moral and religious bond; and its rulers are the lieutenants of God. If the State is a moral person, capable of performing duty, of committing sin, and suffering punishment, which ev eryone must own who traces the fate of nations ac cording to the divine word, it follows that a nation, acting by its rulers, can accept Christianity and make a public profession of it as the national rule and guide. It had been held to gether previ ous to the recog nition of Christianity by some form of religion however impure, without which it could not have existed. And the first duty of the civil ruler when brought in contact with Christianity and per suaded of its divine origin is to RECEIVE THE BIBLE AS A REVELATION in a national way. The imme diate effect of this is that it constitutes the State a Christian State, and pledges it to purge out its previous religion in the same way as Pagan and Mahommedan na tions constituted themselves, according to their false religions, or as the atheistic state was constituted, or rather attempted to be constituted, by the French Convention. A nation must have a religion, and the only question is, which it will adopt. And when Christianity comes to the nation, or to the family, it does not frown on either of these institutions, which also are divine in origin, but enters into them with an elevating purifying power, and sweetly coalesces with all that is purely human in both. These ordinances of God now became vessels by which Christianity is diffused. The national recognition of the Bible as a reve lation sub jecting the nation to its authority, though a great step gained, does not exhaust the nation's duty, as widely diverging views prevail upon the right interpretation of the Bible. The State must by the necessity of the case ADOPT A CREED which will com monly be prepared by the Church. The same duty that devolves upon an in dividual Christian confronts a Christian State, and it naturally appends the civil sanction to the Church's creed. It must distinguish between scripture truth and its perversion. The State, by the adoption of a creed, gives utterance to the self-consciousness of a Christian community. It confesses the Christianity it has adopted." - From the rare bound photocopy The Scottish Theory of Ecclesiastical Establishments by George Smeaton (1875), pp. 4-5. Common Grace The common blessings of the weather point to the common law of God. God's blessings must always be seen in terms of God' general covenant with mankind, and this covenant always involves biblical law. What Jesus was saying was that His people must deal with unbelievers in terms of biblical law, just as God deals with them. Love means the fulfilling of the law toward all men (Rom. 13:8) (Gary North, from Dominion and Common Grace cited in the appendix of The Marrow of Modern Divinity, pp. 379-380)

QUOTE OF THE MONTH




Covenanting and the One True Religion




"We all and every one of us under-written, protest, That, after long and due examination of our own consciences in matters of true and false religion, we are now thoroughly resolved in the truth by the word and Spirit of God: and therefore we believe with our hearts, confess with our mouths, subscribe with our hands, and constantly affirm, before God and the whole world, that this only is the true Christian faith and religion, pleasing God, and bringing salvation to man, which now is, by the mercy of God, revealed to the world by the preaching of the blessed evangel; and is received, believed, and defended by many and sundry notable kirks and realms, but chiefly by the kirk of Scotland, the King's Majesty, and three estates of this realm, as God's eternal truth, and only ground of our salvation; as more particularly is expressed in the Confession of our Faith, established and publickly confirmed by sundry acts of Parliaments, and now of a long time hath been openly professed by the King's Majesty, and whole body of this realm both in burgh and land.  To the which Confession and Form of Religion we willingly agree in our conscience in all points, as unto God's undoubted truth and verity, grounded only upon his written word. . . . And therefore we abhor and detest all contrary religion and doctrine. . . ." (The National Covenant of Scotland, subscribed at different times:1580, 1581, 1590, 1638, 1639, 1640, 1650, 1651, p. 347 in the Free Presbyterian Publications volume of the Westminster Confession of Faith, emphases added).

From: Westminster Confession of Faith by the Westminster Divines (1647), p. 347.

The Crime of Tolerance ...since no one can describe an approach more equitable and wholesome to the commonwealth than that which God describes in his law, it is certainly the duty of all kings and princes who recognize that God has put them over his people that they follow most studiously his own method of punishing evildoers... insofar as the substance and proper end of these commandments are concerned,and especially those which enjoin the discipline that is necessary for the whole commonwealth, whoever does not reckon that such commandments are to conscientiously observed is certainly not attributing to God either supreme wisdom or a righteous care for our salvation. Accordingly, in every state sanctified to God Capital punishment must be ordered for all who have dared to injure religion, either by introducing a false and impious doctrine about the worship of God or by calling people away from the true worship of God (Deut. 13:6-10) and 17:2-5); for all who blaspheme the name of God and his solemn services (Lev. 24:15-16); who violate the Sabbath (Ex. 7:14-15, and 35:2; Num. 15:32-36); who rebelliously despise the authority of parents and live their own life wickedly (Deut. 21:18-21; who are unwilling to submit to the sentence of a supreme tribunal (Deut. 17:8-12); who have committed bloodshed (Ex. 21:12; Lev. 24:17; Deut. 19:11-13), adultery (Lev. 20:10), rape (Deut. 22:20-25), kidnapping (Deut. 24:7); who have given false testimony in a capital case (Deut. 19:16-21). No on knows better or provides more diligently what is for man's salvation than God. In these sanctions of God, we see that he judges that the death penalty should eliminate from his people whoever has openly defected from him or held him in contempt or persuades others to do the same, to the betrayal and vitiation of true religion; those who have done injury to his mane and who have obstinately detracted from the authority of God as it is administered through his ordinary agents, fathers of families or of country; or finally, those who have attempted to take the life of a neighbor or of his wife or children. For those who are involved is such enormous crimes cannot but inflict great ruin on mankind. By the responsible cooperation of all good men, these pests are therefore to be exterminated from human society no less than fierce wolves, lions, tigers, dragons, and crocodiles which occasionally attack men in order to tear them to pieces and devour them. . (Martin Bucer, De Regno Christi [On the Kingdom of Christ] in Pauck, ed. Melanchthon and Bucer [Westminster Press, 1969], pp. 378-379) Calvin was a close friend and, in his earlier years, a disciple of the first generation Reformer Martin Bucer... Calvin's high regard for Bucer may been seen in his his statements: "a most faithful doctor of the Church... his rare learning and copious knowledge... clearness of wit, much reading and many other virtue [wherein he is almost by none now living excelled, has few equals and excels most]... none in this age has used exacter diligence in the exposition of Scripture. (Cited in Journal of Christian Reconstruction: Puritanism & Law, p. 23) The Culture of Death Versus the Lord of Life "If you can't control consumption, then you have to control the consumer... It's better just to convince the victims to kill themselves, so that's what they did.1 They convinced them that the laws of God about human sexuality were all wrong.2 The government and the media and the academics promoted the demise of the family with easy divorce, government welfare,3 and in trusion into the family.4 They created the new counterfeit 'rights' to destroy the real rights.5 They encouraged women to work outside the home and aban don their children,6 and after all, a new car is more important than another child, right?7 A working mother can't be tied down to five children.8 In effect, they convinced almost everyone, contrary to the law of God, to per form VOLUNTARY GENOCIDE on themselves by limiting the size of their families.9 Then they promoted homosexuality. Any way you cut it, no matter how long 'Adam and Steve' are 'married,' no mat ter how many times they do whatever it is they do to each other, THEY WILL NOT HAVE ANY CHIL DREN. So you remove a big slice out of the reproductive population by promoting sodomy.10 Then there was AIDS...11 And look, if you can't get rid of the suckers any other way and you need to cull the herd, then why not convince them to kill their own children? So you legalize abortion and promote it as an alternative method of 'birth control.12 ...Besides, that cheapens human life and softens up the suckers for the next step: killing off the old folks.13 First you bake the cake of human concern for 'dignity in death,' and then you pour on the icing of self interest: it cost lots to keep the old 'useless eaters' alive. Don't be selfish; make way for the next generation, not a mild inducement in a society that wor ships youth. A by-product of the euthanasia industry is suicide at all ages. You know, we all have to go sometime, so why not be like God and decide for ourselves when we'll go? And they introduced the death cult in rock music.14 That convinced the young ones to kill them selves before they got to breeding age and cluttered up the scene with still more children. All this was part and parcel of the same cult of death worship. You know what Scripture says: 'all those who hate me love death.15 And in judgement the God of life abandoned them to the de sires of their heart. They wanted death, and that's what they got. Lots of it... So gradually, gradually, the government conquered group after group. They convinced the people that they couldn't be responsible for themselves, that only the government had the wisdom necessary to make the hard decisions forced upon us by the complicated modern world. And this is the essence of slavery: the free man gives up responsibility for himself.16 I'm always amused by people who want to reject the so-called 'harsh laws of God.' But Jesus said, 'Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me, for my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.' He's the God of life, and His law is the law of life.17 The law of men is the law of death."18 1. Cf. Jacqueline Kasun, The War Against Population: The Economics and Ideology of Population Control (San Francisco, CA: Ignatius, 1988).-RB (Reg Barrow) 2. For a succinct and excellent explanation of the law of God concerning sexuality (i.e. the seventh commandment) see The Westminster Larger Catechism in the Westminster Confession of Faith (Glasgow, Scotland: Free Presbyterian Publications, [1648] reprinted 1994), questions and answers 137-139, found on pages 222-225 of this edition.-RB 3. Cf. David Hall, ed., Welfare Reformed: A Compassionate Approach (Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing/Legacy Communications, 1994). 4. Cf. George Grant,The Family Under Siege: What the New Social Engineers Have in Mind for You and Your Children (Minneapolis, Minnesota: Bethany House Publishers, 1994). 5. Cf. Steve Schlissel, The Right to Death (cassette distributed by Still Waters Revival Books) and E. Calvin Beisner, Man, Economy, and the Environment in Biblical Perspective (Moscow, ID: Canon Press, 1994).-RB 6. Charles Church, A Word on Working Mothers (Mt. Carmel Publications, n.d.) or Jane Schulz, The Christian Woman's Place (n.p., n.d.). 7. Cf. Charles Provan, The Bible and Birth Control (Monongahela, PA: Zimmer Printing, 1989) or Steve Schlissel, Birth Control and the Christian (cassette). 8. Cf. Mary Pride, The Way Home: Beyond Feminism, Back to Reality (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, Thirteenth printing 1993) or Mary Pride, All the Way Home: Power for Your Fam ily To Be its Best (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, Second printing 1989).-RB 9. Cf. Charles Provan, The Bible and Birth Control (Monongahela, PA: Zimmer Printing, 1989) or the cassette sermon Birth Control and the Christian by Steve Schlissel. 10. Cf. George Grant, Legislating Immorality: The Homosexual Movement Comes Out of the Closet (Moody Press/Legacy Communications, 1993), George Grant or the video Gay Rights - Special Rights: Inside the Homosexual Agenda (Hemet, CA: Jeremiah Films, 1993).-RB 11. Cf. Steve Schlissel AIDS and the Wrath of God (cassette).-RB 12. For "a pro-life weapon of unprecedented might" obtain a copy of the video Hard Truth co-produced by American Portrait Films, The Center for Bio-Ethical Reform and Reel to Real Min istries. 13. See the video The Right to Kill (Cleveland, OH: American Portrait Films, 1989).-RB 14. Cf. The video set Hells Bells: The Dangers of Rock 'n' Roll written and produced by Eric Holmberg of Reel to Real Ministries (P.O. Box 4145, Gainesville, FL 32613) for docu men tation regarding this point.-RB 15. Proverbs 8:36-RB 16. Cf. Erik von Kuehnelt-Ledden, Leftism Revisited: From de Sade and Marx to Hitler and Pol Pot (Washington, DC: Regnery Gateway, 1990). To be tempered with Samuel Rutherfurd, A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience (London, England: Andrew Cook, 1649) and George Smeaton, The Scottish Theory of Ecclesiastical Establishments (Edinburgh, Scot land: Lyon & Gemmell, 1875).-RB 17. See the Puritan book The True Bounds of Christian Freedom (Edinburgh, Scotland: Banner of Truth, [1645] 1978) by Samuel Bolton, Dr. Greg L. Bahnsen's By This Standard: The Authority of God's Law Today (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1985), or Dr. Bahnsen's cassette set The Theonomic Thesis, for more study concerning the Lord's perfect law of life.-RB 18. This entire quotation, excepting the footnotes, is taken from: Franklin Sanders, Heiland (Hamilton, Bermuda: Machrihanish Limited, 1986), pp. 176-181. This novel is set in 2020 A.D. when America is divided into two societies: the Insiders and the Freemen. One is founded on the worship of death - the other on a new obedience to God (backcover). It takes a look at one scenario of where the ideas being promoted today, both Godly and ungodly, could lead us in a quarter of a century. Fascinating reading! This quotation (July, 1994) has been brought to you by Still Waters Revival Books. For a complimentary copy of our large discount Christian book, cassette, and video catalogue write: SWRB(Q) 4710-37A Ave, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6L 3T5.-RB The Curse of Antinomianism Antinomians deny the existence of this inheritance system in history. This antinomian viewpoint regarding the systematic long-term outworking of God's visible covenantal judgements in the Christian era leads directly to what F. N. Lee has termed pessimillennialism, referring to both premillennialism and amillennialism. Covenant-keeping people will not progressively inherit the earth before Christ comes again physically, we are told. In contrast, Christian reconstructionists affirm God's visible sanctions in history. If there is predictable long-term positive feedback (external blessings) in history for covenant-keeping, which Deuteronomy 28:1-14 insists that there is, and if there is long-term negative feedback (external cursings) in history for covenant-breaking, which Deuteronomy 28:15-68 insists that there is, then those who obey God must inevitably extend their external dominion over time, while those who disobey God must inevitably have external dominion removed from them. God's sanctions in history still exist. this was John Calvin's view, but modern Calvinists have abandoned it. God's covenantal law-order inevitably leads to the external cultural triumph of God's covenantally faithful people. This of course, is postmillennialism. (North, Political Polytheism: The Myth of Pluralism [ICE, 1989], p. 50.) Education I am afraid that the schools will prove the very gates of hell, unless they diligently labor in explaining the Holy Scriptures and engraving them in the heart of the youth. (Martin Luther cited in Klicka, Chris The Right Choice, The Incredible Failure of Public Education & the Rising Hope of Home Schooling - An Academic, Historical, Practical, & Legal Perspective [Oregon: Noble Publishing Assoc., 1992], p. 88). The Public schools have a singular adherence to secular humanism, and defined as a total lifestyle without reference to or need of God... the public schools are not neutral, it is anti-Christian. For a Christian to send his children to the public school is just as consistent as sending them to a Unitarian Sunday school: they are learning the opposite of what is taught in the Word of God. (E. Town cited in Klicka, Chris The Right Choice, The Incredible Failure of Public Education & the Rising Hope of Home Schooling - An Academic, Historical, Practical, & Legal Perspective [Oregon: Noble Publishing Assoc., 1992], p. 92). There is not a square inch of ground in heaven or on earth or under the earth in which there is peace between Christ and Satan... If you say that you are "not involved" you are involved in Satan's side. If you say you are involved in the struggle... in the area of the family and in the church, but not in the school, you are deceiving yourself. (Rushdoony in Philosophy of Christian Education citing Van Til from Essays on Christian Education, p. 26.) Family ...the spring then of all reformation, in towns, churches, nations (next to personal reformation, where every on mends one, that is himself) is that which is found in families. If they were but either well constituted, or well ordered and reformed, the whole work were done. (Cited in Cawdrey, "Family Reformation Promoted," Coldwell, ed., An Anthology of Presbyterian & Reformed Literature [Naphtali Press], vol. 4, p. 55) ...for it is obvious to every observation, that families are the seminaries [schools] of towns, churches, countries, and nations; and are as it were, the hives, out of which do swarm the materials of greater assemblies; if therefore they be not well principled therein all their relations, the rest must needs miscarry (Cited in Cawdrey, "Family Reformation Promoted," Coldwell, ed., An Anthology of Presbyterian & Reformed Literature [Naphtali Press], vol. 4, p. 54) family worship The head of the family is to take care that none of the family withdraw himself from any part of family-worship: and, seeing the ordinary performance of all the parts of family-worship belongs properly to the head of the family, the minister is to stir up such as are lazy, and train up such as are weak, to a fitness to these exercises... (The Directory for Family Worship [IV], bound with the FPC of Scotland's edition of the Westminster Confession of Faith [1647]). Free and Unchangeable Ordination God form all eternity, did, by the most wise and holy counsel of His own will, freely, and unchangeably ordain whatsoever comes to pass: yet so, as thereby neither is God the author of sin, not is violence offered to the will of the creatures; mot is the liberty or contingency of second causes taken away, but rather established. (The Westminster Confession of Faith [1647], ch. 3:1) FURTHER STUDY CONCERNING WORSHIP Regulative Principle Bogue, Carl W. The Scriptural Law of Worship (Dallas, TX: Presbyterian Heritage Publications, 1988). Boston, Thomas. "Of the Second Commandment," Commentary on the Shorter Catechism (Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, [1853] 1993), vol. 2, pp. 127-157. Cunningham, William. "Church Power," Discussions on Church Principles: Popish, Erastian, and Presbyterian (AB: Still Waters Revival Books, [1863] 1991), pp. 235-56. Cunningham, William. The Reformers and the Theology of the Reformation (Edinburgh, Scotland: The Banner of Truth Trust, [1862] 1989), pp. 7-46. Gillespie, George. "A Dispute Against the English Popish Ceremonies Obtruded on the Church of Scotland," Works (Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, [1637] reprinted from the 1846 edition, 1991), vol. 1. Dispute also forthcoming in a single volume (re-typeset with Latin translations) from Naphtali Press at P.O. Box 141084 Dallas TX 75214. Girardeau, John, "Discretionary Power of the Church," An Anthology of Presbyterian & Reformed Literature (Dallas, TX: Naphtali Press [1859] 1991), vol. 3, No. 4, pp. 33-48. The Westminster Confession of Faith (1647) Owen, John. "A Discourse Concerning Liturgies, and Their Imposition," Works (Edinburgh, Scotland: Banner of Truth Trust, [1850-53] 1976), Vol. 15, pp. 1-55. Smith, Frank & David Lachman, ed. Worship in the Presence of God (Greenville, SC: Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1992). Psalms in General Binnie, William. The Psalms: Their History, Teachings, and Use (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1886). Romaine, William. Essay on Psalmody (Chesley, 1880). Exclusive Psalmody Bushell, Michael. The Songs of Zion (Pittsburgh, PA: Crown and Covenant Publications, 1980, 1994). Macleod, Donald, ed., "Purity of Worship," Hold Fast Your Confession: Studies in Church Principles (Edinburgh, Scotland: The Knox Press, 1978), pp. 93-129. McNaughter, John, ed. The Psalms in Worship (Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, [1907], 1992). Murray, John. Minority Report: The Scriptural Warrant Respecting Song in the Public Worship of God Submitted to the Fourteenth General Assembly of the OPC 1947. Republished by the Presbyterian Reformed Church, see Presbyterian Reformed Magazine below for address. Ward, Rowland. Psalm Singing in Scripture and History (Melbourne, Australia: Ward, 1985). Williamson, G. I. The Singing of Psalms in the Worship of God (Reformed Presbyterian Church of Northern Ireland). The True Psalmody; or, The Bible Psalms the Church's only Manual of Praise (Dallas, TX: Naphtali Press [1859] 1991). Practical Helps The Book of Psalms for Singing (Board of Education and Publication RPCNA, 1973, 1975, 1978, 1980, 1983, 1987). Accompaniment cassettes for the above title from 7408 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15208. Psalms in Metre (Oxford University Press, 1990). Accompaniment cassettes for the above title from: Free Church of Scotland Bookshop, 15 North Bank Street, The Mound, Edinburgh EH1 2LS, Scotland. Psalms of David in Metre with Notes by John Brown (Dallas, TX: Presbyterian Heritage Publications, [1841] 1991). Musical Instruments Begg, James. Anarchy in Worship (Edinburgh: Lyon & Gemmell, George IV. Bridge, 1875). Reprinted by James A. Dodson circa 1988. Girardeau, John L. Instrumental Music in Public Worship (Havertown, PA: New Covenant Publication Society, [1888] 1983). Glasgow, James. Heart and Voice: Instrumental Music in Christian Worship Not Divinely Authorized (Belfast, circa 1870). Magazines or Newsletters Christian Reconstruction Today "Worship: The Regulative Principle of Worship in History," Issue 16-17, Mar.-June, 1991 and "Psalm Singing in Scripture and History," Issue 18-19, July-Oct., 1991 and Revival Review "The Psalms in Worship" reviewed in issue 20-21, Mar.-June, 1992) -- all written by Reg Barrow. For copies write Still Waters Revival Books. Contra Mundum, "Worship & Confession" No. 5 -- Fall 1992. P.O. Box 32652, Fridley, MN. USA 55432-0652. Presbyterian Reformed Magazine, 2408 Holt Street, Vienna, VA. USA 22180. Gary North on Dave Hunt Dave Hunt's problem is that he is intellectually incompetent in matters of theology, a fact he freely attests to by his constant refrain during public debates when he is losing the argument: "I'm not a theologian, but...." He surely isn't, no "buts" about it. He systematically refuses to respond, line by line, to our previous published criticisms of his "facts," his logic, and his outright lies (see footnote in book-RB). What is our appropriate response? We have written two full length books against him (The Reduction of Christianity and The Debate Over Christian Reconstruction-RB). He has yet to respond. What now? (I)'ll tell you what. We will go on down the road, presenting a comprehensive positive alternative to Hunt's ever-predicted, never-fulfilled rapture. The best defense is a good offense. Dave Hunt can't beat something with nothing. The best answer to bad negative theology is good positive theology. The best answer to historical despair is the gospel of Jesus Christ. Gary North, Christian Reconstruction: What It Is, What It Isn't (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1991), p. 174. Gillespie on Unlawful Ceremonies and Monuments of By-Past Idolatry "...God has not only by his precepts commanded us to abolish all the relics of idolatry, but by his promises also manifested unto us how acceptable service this should be to him. There is a command, that the Israelites should destroy all the idolatrous material of those people, to which commandment, says Junius, he subordinates his promise... (Gillespie, pg 156) Gillespie instructs us that God's people were to utterly destroy the relics and material of the idols that they came across. It doesn't appear to matter from his argument or from scripture whether these idols were found in use by God's people in worship or under any other circumstance. The issue here is if you find idolatrous material, destroy it. "...I fortify my proposition by approved examples. And, First, we find that Jacob (Gen 35:4) did not only abolish out of his house the idols, but their ear-rings also, because they were superstitionis insignia (signs of superstition), as Calvin; res ad idololatriam pertinentes (pertaining to idolatry), as Junius; monilia idolis consecrata (necklaces consecrated to idols), as Paereus calls them; all writing upon that place... And what example more considerable than that of Hezekiah, who not only abolished such monuments of idolatry as at their first institution were but men's invention, but broke down also the brazen serpent (though originally set up at God's own command), when once he saw it abused to idolatry." (Gillespie, p. 158) "God commanded to say to the covering, and the ornaments of idols, "Get thee hence" (Isa. 30:22) It is not enough they be purged from the abuse, but simpliciter they themselves must pack them and be gone. How did Jacob with the ear-rings of the idols; Elijah with Baal's altar; Jehu with his vestments; Josiah with his houses; Manasseh with his altars; Moses with the golden calf; Joshua with the temples of Canaan; Hezekiah with the brazen serpent? Did they retain the things themselves, and only purge them from the abuse? Belike (Suppose), if these our opposites had been their counsellors, they had advised them to be contented with such a moderation; yet we see they were better counselled when they destroyed utterly the things themselves, whereby we know that they were of the same nind with us, and thought that things abused to idolatry, if they have no necessary use, are far better away than in place." (Gillespie, 162) "And is not the danger of retaining idolatrous churches thus pointed at by P. Martyr: ...Jehu (he says) took care to have the temples of Baal overthrown, lest they should return any more to their wonted use. Wherefore, it appears, that many do not rightly, who, having embraced the gospel of the Son of God, yet, notwithstanding, keep still the instruments of Popery. And they have far better looked to piety who have taken care to have popish images, statues and ornaments, utterly cut off. " (Gillespie, 165) "...our proposition is backed with a twofold reason, for things which have been notoriously abused by idolatry should be abolished... Those relics therefore of idolatry, by which succeeding generations, as though by a memorial, may be warned (as Wolphius rightly says) are to be quite defaced and destroyed, because they serve to honor the memory of cursed idols." (Gillespie, pg 160) "A Dispute against the English Popish Ceremonies Obtruded on the Church of Scotland" by George Gillespie, from the chapter entitled "That The Ceremonies Are Unlawful, Because They Are Monuments Of By-Past Idolatry, Which Not Being Necessary To Be Retained, Should Be Utterly Abolished, Because Of Their Idolatrous Abuse: All Which Is Particularly Made Good Of Kneeling" Gillespie on Christmass Keeping and More George Gillespie (Commissioner to the Westminister Assembly) "Forasmuch then, as kneeling before the consecrated bread, the sign of the cross, surplice, festival days, bishopping, bowing to the altar, administration of the sacraments in private places, etc. are the wares of Rome, the baggage of Babylon, the trinkets of the whore, the badges of Popery, the ensigns of Christ's enemies and the very trophies of Antichrist: we cannot conform, communicate, and symbolize with the idolatrous Papists, in the use of the same, without making ourselves idolaters by participation." (Works of Gillespie, Part 3, p. 35) GOD'S LAW The moral law doth for ever bind all, as well justified persons as others, to the obedience thereof (Rom. 13:8-10; [James 1:25; 2:8-12; Duet. 5:32]); and that not only in regard of the matter contained in it, but also in respect of the authority of God, the Creator, who gave it (James 2:10, 11). Neither doth Christ in the gospel any way dissolve, but much strengthen this obligation (Matt. 5:17-19; James 2:8; Rom. 3:31). - From Chapter 19:5 of The Westminster Confession of Faith (Free Presbyterian Publications, [1647]1981 edition), pp. 82. My son, do not forget my teaching, But let your heart keep my commandments; For length of days and years of life, And peace they will add to you. (Proverbs 3:1-2, NASB) Government Control and Government Money ...governmental control doesn't accompany government money; rather, the reverse is true. When a lobby receives government money, it is more a sign that it controls the government. Tribute is paid to the victor by the vanquished. During the Reagan and Bush administrations, leftist groups such as Planned Parenthood received federal money. Was Ronald Reagan controlling Planned Parenthood? No. The money flowing to them demonstrates their power, which is so great that even a conservative, pro-life president found it impossible to cut off their fund ing. (Continue reading for Bowyer's second blast.-ed.) I have read in other places the argument that government should have no involvement in education because the Bible does not give instructions for it to be involved. These authors set forward what I call the "regulative principle of the state." Just as the regulative principle of worship says that what is not explicitly commanded is therefore forbidden, the regulative principle of the state says that what is not explicitly commanded to the government is forbidden. This principle is, as far as I know, without significant precedent in Church history, lacking in exegetical support, and leads to absurd policy implications (e.g. the elimination of traffic laws). This "libertarian model" of Christian statesmanship is inferior to the his toric Calvinist view, which I call the "patriarchal model." If the family and church fail in their appointed duties, the covenant community may act through the state to fill the need. If families and churches don't feed the poor, is it a sin for the state to do it? Is it preferable to let them starve? This is the hard question for advocates of the libertarian model. The same question can be asked regarding the poor and education. - Jerry Bowyer, The Christian Statesman Magazine (5704 Elgin Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15206-1636 USA), "Bowyer's Blast," in the Educational Choice issue, January-Feb., 1993. pp. 16-17. Grace and the Atonement Those who desire to study further the relationship between the doctrines of grace and the atonement will find an extensive examination of the relevant scriptures in John Owen's work, The Death of Death in the Death of Christ, and Spurgeon's position was the same as the great Puritan's (Iain Murray, The Forgotten Spurgeon, pp. 76-77) THE GREAT UNWANTED BLESSING Jesus said that whosoever welcomes a lit tle child in his name wel comes him (Matt. 18:1-5). We welcome children when we are willing to bear them in our bodies and nurture them thereafter. Anticipating that some peo ple would always dis parage God's blessing of children, Jesus said, 'See that you do not look down on one of these little ones. For I tell you that their angels in heaven al ways see the face of my Father in heaven' (Matt. 18:10). I'm almost afraid to ask this, because family planning has become as American as motherhood and apple pie used to be-but I have to. If chil dren are a blessing, why don't we want to have them? Can you think of any other blessing that Christians moan about and complain about and do their best to refuse? Wouldn't it sound ludi crous to hear Christians say ing, 'I'm so sick of all this money you've given me, Lord. Please don't give me any more!' or 'I've had enough of the Holy Spirit's power poured out on me to last for the rest of my life. No more for me, thanks!' A blessing is something you want to have. Health, for ex ample. Who after surviv ing three winter flu seasons without catching cold would complain about her bothersome string of good health, or take to standing in drafts and down pours to avoid being that healthy in the fu ture? If the Bible says children are a blessing (and it does) but we don't see it that way, the fault lies in us." - Mary Pride, The Way Home: Beyond Feminism Back to Reality (Crossway Books, 1985), pp. 40-41. The Greatest Commandment The sins forbidden in the first commandment, are, Atheism, in denying or not having a God; Idolatry, in having or worshipping more gods than one, or any with or instead of the true God; the not having and avouching him for God, and our God; the omission or neglect of any thing due to him, required in this commandment; ignorance, forgetfulness, misapprehensions, false opinions, unworthy and wicked thoughts of him; bold and curious searching into his secrets; all profaneness, hatred of god; self-love, self-seeking, and all other inordinate and immoderate setting of our mind, will, or affections upon other things, and taking them off from him in whole or in part; vain credulity, unbelief, heresy, misbelief, distrust, despair, incorrigibleness, and insensibleness under judgements, hardness of heart, pride, presumption, carnal security, tempting of God; using unlawful means, and trusting in unlawful means; carnal delights and joys; corrupt, blind, and indiscreet zeal; lukewarmness, and deadness in the things of God; estranging ourselves, and apostatizing from God; praying, or giving any religious worship, to saints, angels, or any other creatures; all compacts and consulting with the devil, and hearkening to his suggestions; making men the lords of our faith and conscience; slighting and despising God and his commands; resisting and grieving of his Spirit, discontent and impatience at his dispensations, charging him foolishly for the evils he inflicts on us; and ascribing the praise of any good we either are, have or can do, to fortune, idols, ourselves, or any other creature. (Westminster Larger Catechism [1648], Answer 105) Hell Fire Q. What are the punishments of sin in the world to come? A. The punishments of sin in the world to come, are everlasting separation from the comfortable presence of god, and most grievous torments in soul and body, without intermission, in hell-fire for ever. (Westminster Larger Catechism [1648], Question 29) Holiness, Unity and Truth The Church of Christ is to "press on unto perfection," both as regards life and extension. And one way in which it will "press on" is, not by removing from, or by refusing to include in, her written creed any disputed doctrine, but by adding in explicit terms every doctrine of the Word which is denied or rejected. The cry to give up disputed truths, or to hold them in abeyance, for the sake of union, is really a cry to come down from God's heights, to come down from the mountain of truth and holiness into the quagmire of error and sin. God permits doctrine after doctrine of His Word to be doubted, opposed, and denied, not that His people may, after a little struggle, quiescently hand it over to Satan for burial, but that they may understand it more clearly and hold it more tenaciously, and that it may have by explicit declaration a definite place in their Testimony. We may, I think, take it for granted that every truth of God's Revelation will be contested by Satan, and that the followers of the Lamb must "buy," by conflict, every such truth, and exhibit it in the symbols of their faith as a trophy won. When they do that, they will be united, and the end will be at hand. "They overcame him because of the blood of the Lamb, and because of the word of their testimony." Meantime, let Psalm singers thus buy and thus exhibit the truth regarding God's Book of Praise, and the iniquity of hymn-singing will soon begin to hide with shame. From: "How Best to Secure a Return to the Use of the Psalms in the Ordinance of Praise" The Psalms in Worship (Edmonton, Alberta: Still Waters Revival Books, [1907] 1992), Appendix or as Rare Bound Photocopy THE Homosexual Movement The modern homosexual activists desperately want to legislate morality. Their morality. Of should we say, their Immorality. Despite all their high-sounding civil rights rhetoric-limiting majorities to protect minorities-they are intent on remaking American culture in their own image, beginning with the military. They are intent on holding the majority captive to the fancies, follies, and foibles of the minority. Freedom... can only survive in an ecology of Christian morality. Our founding fathers new that only to well. Therefore, if we genuinely desire Lady Liberty to kiss our land with her fresh fragrance and lush bounty, we had best turn from promiscuity and perversion and fully embrace the values and virtues that our framers embraced: the values and virtues of the Bible. It was the opinion of one of early America's most distinguished statesmen and jurists, fisher Ames, that "no man can be a sound lawyer in this land who is not well read in the ethics of Moses and the virtues of Jesus. That is as true today as it was then-regardless of what the homosexual activist and their cohorts may or may not believe. (Grant, George & Mark Horne. Legislating Immorality: The Homosexual Movement Comes Out of the Closet [Moody/Legacy, 1993], p. 162.) Hidden away in section D of the Denver Post, a few of us found the story of ultimate hypocrisy: Terry Schleder, the leader of Boycott Colorado, had been seen by a reporter enjoying herself on the ski slopes of Breckenridge, Colorado. Schleder, the one who had told the nation to ski Utah until Amendment 2 was repealed, had in this incident demonstrated that her personal principles were exempted in the face of five inches of fresh powder. The Colorado ski revenues, and boycott hypocrisy, both went on to break all records in the '93-93 season. In June of '93 an Associated Press article appeared measuring the (gay) boycott's impact: "A brokerage firm's economic report says Colorado posted more rapid economic gains than any other state during the past year. Kemper Securities, which released the report last week, rated Colorado No. 1 on its list for the first quarter of this year [it's hard to argue with being number 1]. The weakest states were California, Hawaii and New Jersey." Not only did this report reveal the media hype on the boycott, it is interesting to note that the states rated dead last in economic performance (California, Hawaii and New Jersey), are ranked at the top for embracing gay rights laws. Could there be more than a casual connection between economic misery and the success of the gay agenda? (Bransford, Stephen. Gay Politics vs. Colorado & America [Cascade, Colorado: Sardis Press, 1994], p. 182). HOW TO RESPOND TO SATAN (THE ACCUSER OF THE BRETHREN) AND HIS CONTEMPORARY COHORTS, THE MODERN MEDIA DOGS (aka THE COCKROACHES OF COMMUNICATIONS) IN SUCH TIMES AS OURS IT IS EASY to seem a bigot, if one keeps a firm hold of truth, and is careful to have the seal of Heaven on his hope. No Christian can be true and faithful now-a-days on whose brow the world shall not brand the name of bigot. But let him bear it. It is a mark of honor, though intended to be a brand of shame. It proves him to be an associate of the men of whom the world was not worthy, but who under the world's lash, did more for the world's good than all besides. The world ever suffers by the men it honors. The men of mercy to it are the men it hates. Ah, these old Covenanters of our native land were stern bigots in their day. It was well for Scotland that they were. They could part with their lives, but they could not sell (out-RB) the truth. They would yield all for conscience, but they would yield nought to despots. They could bear to suffer and to die, but they were afraid to sin. It was this bigotry which won its liberty for their native land. The legacy bequeathed to it by these men of faith, whose only home was oft the mountain cavern, and to whom the snow was oft the only winding-sheet which wrapped their bodies when they had given their lives for Christ, was a richer boon than all ever given to it by the kings who occupied its throne, and by all men of title and of wealth who owned it acres. Oh yes, they were bigots these, in the judgement of scoffing sceptics and of ruthless persecu tors, and not all the piles they could kindle could burn their bigotry out of them. And these were stern bigots, too, according to the world's estimate, who headed the crusade against Antichrist, when, at the era of the Reformation, a fire from Heaven had kindled in their hearts the love of truth. It was by un flinching resolution, induced by living faith, these men overcame in the times of stern trial in which they unfurled their banner in the name of God. A plaint Melanchthon would have bartered the gospel for peace-the stern courage of a Luther was needed to prevent the sacrifice. In every age, from the beginning, when the cause of truth emerged triumphant from the din and dust of controversy, the victory was won by a band of bigots who were sworn to its defense. From: Kennedy, John. Cited in the bound photocopy of Hyper-Evangelism (Published as a bound photo copy by Still Waters Revival Books, reprinted 1992). Please feel free to copy and distribute this sheet, it is not copyrighted in any way! Also, write SWRB at 4710-37A Ave. Edmonton AB Canada T6L 3T5 for a complimentary catalogue containing discounted Reformed books, tapes and videos (and some free samples newsletters too). ICONOCLASM For even the good kings of ancient Judah, who expelled the worship of the Baals from the temple, left the Asherim and their devotees undisturbed on the hills. So rooted in communal life had these deities become, that it was unthinkable to be rid of them. In the late twentieth century the West is similarly plagued with major and minor idols, , some of them all but invisible. It is hard to imagine a more important or satisfying role than to embark on the spiritual, intellectual, and political adventure of working toward stripping them, root and branch, from the land. (Herbert Schlossberg, Idols for Destruction: The Conflict of Christian Faith and American Culture [Crossway Books, 1990], pp. 334-335) I Desire Books Next to Tyndale falls to be placed Miles Coverdale, who followed so closely in his footsteps, labouring in the same great work and sharing many of the same great trials and privations... "Nothing in the world," he says in the first letter he wrote to Cromwell, "I desire but books; these once had, I do not doubt but the Almighty God shall perform that in me which he hath begun." The books were got and God blessed the study of them, so that he became on of the earliest preachers of the new (Reformed-RB) faith in Essex and Suffolk. (A. F. Mitchell, The Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards, "Origins of Puritanism," [SWRB, 1882, rpt. 1992], p. 12) Idolatry and the First Commandment by Thomas Boston (Taken from: Thomas Boston,. Commentary on the Shorter Catechism [Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, reprinted 1993], pp. 125-27). Thou shalt have no other gods before me (Exod. 20:3). I shall now shut up all with the consideration of these words, before me. 'These words before me, in the first commandment, teach us, that God who seeth all things, taketh special notice of, and is much displeased with the sin of having any other god.' First, God taketh special notice of the sin of having any other god. 1. He taketh special notice of the gross sin of idolatry. He has a jealous eye on it, and will not overlook it; for it is spiritual adultery; and the husband will overlook many faults in his wife, who will not overlook that. Idolaters have their fig-leaf covers for their idolatry. How do the Papists set their wits on the rack to frame such nice and subtle distinctions as may palliate their horrid idolatry! But though they may deceive the simple with these things, yet they cannot blind the eyes of the all-seeing God. Seeing God takes such notice of it, how lamentable is it that idolatry makes such vast progress in this covenanted land, and is not duly noticed! How sad is it, that the sin and dishonor against God is not noticed, so as to be mourned over, and to take notice of it to repress it! This is a sad sign of the danger of being over-run with it. 2. God takes special notice of heart idolatry, of whatever possesseth his room in the heart. That is a subtle kind of idolatry, so hid that others cannot, nay men themselves do not always, perceive what it is that is their idol. But God sees it very well. (1.) The idol may be of a spiritual nature, which the man cannot discern till the law be carried home on the soul in its spiritual extent. Thus Paul's duties and seeming holiness were his idol, Rom. 7:9. (2.) It may lie in lawful things. Things unlawful in themselves may quickly be seen with the snare in them. It is easy to discern the devil when he appears with his cloven foot, so to speak: but it is not so easy to see a man's ruin lying in houses and lands, husband, wife, and children, goods and gear: yet these may be the idols. (3.) The idol may go under the name of an infirmity; Thus many deceive themselves with entertaining reigning sins, under the name of infirmities. (4.) Self-love acts its part here, being ready to magnify men's good, and extenuate their evil. And so they nourish their disease, and hug the viper that is gnawing at their bowels. (5.) There may be a judicial stroke in it. They will not entertain the discoveries which God makes them; and they shutting their eyes, the Lord strikes them blind. Secondly, God is specially displeased with our having any other god. 1. He is displeased with gross idolatry. He shows his special wrath in this life against idolaters, as against the Israelites, for worshipping the golden calf; and against the ten tribes, for their idolatry at Dan and Bethel. So old Babylon was, and new Babylon will be destroyed. All idolaters will be punished in the other life, Rev. 21:8. Let us then show our displeasure against, and resolve in the Lord's strength, to oppose the spreading of idolatry, choosing rather to suffer than sin. 2. He is displeased with the idols which men set up in their hearts. He shows his displeasure several ways. (1.) Sometimes the Lord, in the fury of his jealousy, forces the idol out of the way, as he did, in the case of Micah's idol, Judj. 18:24. (2.) Sometimes he reduces the man to a necessity of parting either with his idol or his profession. (3.) Oft-times the Lord makes the idol men's plague and punishment. (4.) Lastly, Oft-times there is a rub by a torrent of temptations, that brings forth the idol in its own colors; as in the case of Judas' covetousness, and Dema's love of the world. Let us therefore cast away our idols, and let nothing keep God's room in our hearts, especially in such a day when God is rising up to plead against us. From the whole ye may see that the commandment is exceeding broad. Be humbled under the sense of your guilt in the breach of this command. And see what great need ye have to reform; and what need ye stand in of the blood of Christ for removing your guilt, and of his Spirit for cleansing your hearts, and subduing your iniquities.1 Little children, keep yourselves from idols. Amen (1John 5:21). Kings, Covenanting and Christ "That all Kings and Princes at their coronation, and reception of their princely authority, shall make their faithful promise by their solemn oath, in the presence of the eternal God, that, enduring the whole time of their lives, they shall serve the same eternal God, to the uttermost of their power, according as he hath required in his most holy word, contained in the Old and New Testament; and according to the same word, shall maintain the true religion of Christ Jesus, the preaching of his holy word, the due and right ministration of the sacraments now received and preached within this realm, (according to the Confession of Faith immediately preceding,) and shall abolish and gainstand all false religion contrary to the same; and shall rule the people committed to their charge, according to the will and command of God revealed in his foresaid word, and according to the laudable laws and constitutions received in this realm, nowise repugnant to the said will of the eternal God; and shall procure, to the uttermost of their power, to the kirk of God, and whole Christian people, true and perfect peace in all time coming: and that they shall be careful to root out of their empire all hereticks and enemies to the true worship of God, who shall be convicted by the true kirk of God of the foresaid crimes... And finally, being convinced in our minds, and confessing with our mouths, that the present and succeeding generations in this land are bound to keep the foresaid national oath and subscription inviolable." From: The National Covenant; or, Confession of Faith... (1638) which can be found in the Westminster Confession of Faith (Free Presbyterian Publications, reprinted 1995.) Knox on Christmass Keeping "By contrary Doctrine, we understand whatsoever men, by Laws, Councils, or constitutions have imposed upon the consciences of men, without the expressed commandment of God's word: such as....keeping...of Christmas... Which things, because in God's scriptures they neither have commandment nor assurance, we judge them utterly to be abolished from this Realm; affirming further, that the obstinate maintainers and teachers of such abominations ought not to escape the punishment of the Civil Magistrate." (Knox's History, Vol 2 pg 547-8) Knox on Man-made Ceremonies "That God's word damns your ceremonies, it is evident; for the plain and straight commandment of God is, "Not that thing which appears good in thy eyes, shalt thou do to the Lord thy God, but what the Lord thy God has commanded thee, that do thou: add nothing to it; diminish nothing from it" Now unless that ye are able to prove that God has commanded your ceremonies, this his former commandment will damn both you and them." (John Knox's History of the Reformation in Scotland, Vol 1, p.91) THE LAST DAYS And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the LORD's house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow unto it. And many people shall go and say, Come ye, and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the house of the God of Jacob; and he will teach us of his ways, and we will walk in his paths: for out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. (Isaiah 2:2, King James Version). LAW When the law is regarded wholly as the expression of state sovereignty, the citizen is ripe for manipulation. (Herbert Schlossberg, Idols for Destruction: The Conflict of Christian Faith and American Culture [Crossway Books, 1990], p. 207) Law and Punishment Thesis 42: The Judicial laws, some of them being hedges and fences to safeguard both moral and ceremonial precepts, their binding power was therefore mixed and various, for those which did safeguard any moral law, (which is perpetual,) whether by just punishments or otherwise, do still morally bind all nations; for, as Piscator argues, a moral law is as good and as precious now in these times as then, and there is as much need of the preservation of these fences to preserve these laws in these times, an at all times, as well as then, there being as much danger of the treading down of those laws by the wild beast of the world and brutish men (sometimes even in churches) now as then; and hence God would have all nations preserve their fences forever, as he would have that law preserved forever which these safeguard; but, on the other side, these judicials which did safeguard ceremonial laws which we know were not perpetual, but proper to that nation, hence those judicials which compass these about are not perpetual not universal; the ceremonials being plucked up by their roots, to what purpose then should their fences and hedges stand? As, on the contrary, the morals abiding, why should not their judicials and fences remain? The learned generally doubt not to affirm that Moses' judicials bind all nations, so far as they contain any moral equity in them, which moral equity doth appear not only in respect of the end of the law, when it is ordered for common and universal good, but chiefly in respect of the law which they safeguard and fence, which if it be moral, it is most just and equal, that either the same or like judicial fence (according to some fit proportion) should preserve it still, because it is but just and that a moral and universal law should be universally preserved; from whence, by the way, the weakness of their reasonings may be observed, who, that they may take away the power of the civil magistrate in matters of the first table, (which once he had in the Jewish commonwealth,) affirm that such civil power then did arise from the judicial, and not from any moral law; when as it is manifest that this his power in preserving God's worship pure from idolatrous and profane mixtures, according to the judicial laws, was no more but a fence and safeguard set about moral commandments; which fences and preservatives are therefore (for substance) to continue in as much power and authority mow as in those days, as long as such laws continue in their morality, which these preserve; the duties of the first table being also as much moral as those of the second, to the preserving of which latter from hurt and spoil in respect of their morality, no wise man questions the extent of his power. (Thomas Shepard [1605-1649, founder of Harvard]. Theses Sabbaticae or The Doctrine of the Sabbath. (Soli Deo Gloria, rpnt. 1992 from the 1853 ed.) LAW, LITURGY, AND LORDSHIP The Aaronical priesthood being the hinge on which the whole cer emonial worship turned, so that upon a change thereof the obligation of the law unto that worship, or any part of it, was necessarily to cease, our blessed Saviour, in his death and ablation, entering upon the office, and actually dis charging the great duty of his priesthood, did virtually put an end to the whole obligation of the first institution of Mosaical worship. In his death was the procurement of the liberty of his disciples com pletely finished, as unto conscience; the supposed obligation of men's traditions, and the real obligation of Mosaical institutions, being by him (the first as a prophet in his teaching, the last as a priest in his offering) dissolved and taken away. From that day all the disciples of Christ were taken under his immediate lordship, and made free to the end of the world from all obligations in conscience unto anything in the worship of God but what is of his own institution and command. - From the rare bound photocopy A Discourse Concerning Liturgies, and Their Imposition by John Owen (1662), pp. 4-5. Life Unto Life, Death Unto Death By the decree of God, for the manifestation of His glory, some men and angels are predestined unto everlasting life; and others foreordained to everlasting death (The Westminster Confession of Faith [1647], ch. 20:3-3) Man the Economic Animal? This doctrine, declaring man to be the measure of all things, has reduced man from the biblical doctrine of man created in the image of God, to man, the economic animal. (R. J. Rushdoony, By What Standard: An Analysis of the Philosophy of Cornelius Van Til [Thoburn, 1983], p. 188)


QUOTE(S) OF THE MONTH


THE MARK OF THE BEAST
(Rev. 13:16-17)

Open Avowed Allegiance and Co-operation with Antichristian or Immoral Civil "Powers."

But it will be asked, "What are we to understand by the 'mark?'" This question is easily answered from history. The heathen idolater gloried in his devotion to his imaginary god; as the ivy leaf was the token of the worshippers of Bacchus: soldiers bore the initials of the names of their commanders; and slaves, of their masters. These characters were impressed on the foreheads or other part of the persons of individuals. The general idea suggested by the "mark" was subjection or property. In short, the mark of the beast signifies open and avowed allegiance to Antichristian or immoral civil power, when in the "forehead;" and active co-operation with the same, when in the "hand."

It is at once a pitiable and culpable error, to suppose, as many preposterously do, that this "mark of the beast" is Popery! And as the "mark" is the recognized badge of loyalty to civil rule, of course, the prohibition to "buy or sell," must signify civil disabilities -- disenfranchisement. Men who suffer, necessarily feel. Christ's witnesses, as they only have the scriptural conception of the rights of man, have long been familiar with the deprivation of their rights, both civil and ecclesiastical. The moral evils incorporated in the constitutions of church and state, throughout all the streets of mystic Babylon, have effectually excluded the two witness, and left them in the "wilderness." Here is their destined "place," and here they are to be "nourished from the face of the serpent" for 1260 years. Christ's promise -- "I will not leave you comfortless" (orphans) -- is all along verified in their soul-satisfying experience.

FROM: Notes on the Apocalypse by David Steele (forthcoming from Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Publishing).


Marriage 

Marriage was ordained for the mutual help of husband and wife, for the
increase of mankind with a legitimate issue, and of the Church with an 
holy
seed; and for the preventing of uncleanness. (The Westminster Confession 
of
Faith [1647], ch. 24:2)



MESSIAH THE PRINCE

		The anti-Christian leaven, which has been so extensively dif fused, 
shall
be purged out of both the churches and the nations. Every usurper of the
rights and prerogatives of Sion's King shall be pushed from his seat. Every
rival kingdom shall be overthrown. The civil and ecclesiastical
constitutions of the earth shall be regulated by the infalli ble standard
of God's word; their office-bearers, of every kind, shall ac knowledge the
authority of Messiah the Prince; and the greatest kings on earth shall cast
their crowns at his feet. All enemies shall be put un der his feet; and
such as resist the melting influence of his grace, shall be crushed beneath
the iron rod of his power. By spiritual conversion or judicial destruction,
he shall effect the entire subjugation of the globe. And, at the last,
there shall not be a spot on the face of the habitable earth where the true
church of Christ shall not have effected a footing, nor a single tribe of
the vast family of man which shall not have felt the meliorating and
blissful influence of Christian laws and institutions.

		- William Symington, Messiah the Prince or,
The Mediatorial Dominion of Jesus Christ
(Still Waters Revival Books, [1884] 1990), pp. 185-86.


The Monster of Toleration

As Fergusson (sermon 1652) proclaimed, "Of all errors, toleration is the most dangerous and damnable, in so far as other errors do only overturn those particular truths of Scripture to which they are contrary; but by this one error (this monster of toleration) way is made to overturn all the truths contained in Scripture, and to the setting up of all errors contrary to every jot of truth; and in the mean time there shall be no power to hinder it, or take order with it" (Cited from the cover of "Ye That Love the Lord, Hate Evil by Fred DiLella). 


Notes on Covenanting



   Q. What constitutes the formal reason of covenant obligation? 
A. It is the personal act of the covenanter which constitutes the formal reason why a duty, when sworn to, is binding as a covenant duty, and not the obligation of the divine law, or morality of the act. "Were the morality of the duty the reason of covenant obligation, then all mankind would be formally covenanters, because the reason extends unto all, inasmuch as the moral law binds every man. Thus covenanting would be a mere cypher, and carry no obligation in it at all; for it does not affect the morality of the duty, that being the same before as after covenanting."
Q. Are public social covenants of continuous obligation? or, are they binding upon the posterity of the original covenanters, as long as the corporate body exists; or, until such time as the object for which they were framed has been accomplished?
A. They are; and this position is sustained by forcible arguments. 1. We find posterity recognised in the transaction between God and Jacob, at Bethel. Gen. xxviii. 13; compared with Hosea xii. 4. "He found him (Jacob) in Bethel, and there he spake with us." 2. We have another remarkable instance of the transmission of covenant obligation to posterity in Deut. v. 2,3. "The Lord our God made a covenant with us in Horeb. The Lord made not this covenant with our fathers (only) but with us, even us, who are all of us here alive this day." 3. Another example occurs in Deut. xxix. 10-15; the covenant is here made with three descriptions of persons. 1. With those addressed adults. "Neither with you only." 2. Minors. "Him that standeth here with us." 3. Posterity. "Him that is not here with us this day"-for this could have no reference to any of the Israelites then in existence, as they were all present. It must, therefore, include posterity, together with all future accessions to the community. With them, Moses informs us, the covenant was made, as well as with those who actually entered into it, in the plains of Moab. 4. Another instance in which posterity is recognised in covenant obligation is found in Joshua ix. 15. This covenant was made between the children of Israel and the Gibeonites. Between four and five hundred years after that time, the children of Israel are visited with a very severe famine, in the days of David. 2 Sam. xxi. 1. And it is expressly declared by the Lord that, "It is for Saul, and for his bloody house, because he slew the Gibeonites." And at the same time, v. 2, that very covenant is recognised, and the breach of it is stated, as being the formal reason of the divine displeasure. Now, had it not been for this covenant, the extirpation of the Gibeonites would not have been imputed to Israel as a thing criminal; for they were comprehended in Caananitish nations, which God had commanded them to root out. 5. Posterity are charged with the sin of violating the covenant of their ancestors. Jer. xi. 10. "The house of Israel, and the house of Judah, have broken my covenant which I made with their fathers"-by which they are evidently considered as bound. 6. The principle of federal representation confirms this doctrine. Thus when Joseph made a covenant with his brethren, that they should carry up his bones from Egypt to the land of promise, he assumed that those whom he addressed, were the representatives of their successors, as he knew well that the whole of that generation should die before the deliverance of Israel by Moses. Posterity recognised the obligation. Ex. xiii. 19. A similar case of federal representation, is that of the Gibeonites quoted above. 6. Infant baptism is a forcible illustration of the continuous obligation of covenants. 7. The principle of the transmissibility of the obligations of covenants to posterity, is recognised by civilians in civil matters. In the obligations, for example, of the heir of an estate, for the engagements of his predecessor in the possession of it. All national treaties and other engagements of the corporate body, descend with all their weight upon succeeding generations."
A small section from:

"On the Duty of Covenanting and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants"

 

being section 11 in the
Reformed Presbyterian Catechism
by William Roberts (1853)




See also: 
All of section 11, "On the Duty of
Covenanting and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants,"
in the Reformed Presbyterian Catechism
by
William Roberts (1853). Contains all the Scripture you will ever
need to prove that covenanting is an
ordinance of God and a continuing moral duty
for men today.
Permanence of Covenant Obligation by Omicron (1856).
Shows how Scripture teaches that covenants bind posterity.






Occult Interpretation of Scripture

The hermeneutical (interpretive-RB) principles which we have now set 
forth
necessarily exclude the doctrine that the prophecies of Scripture contain
an occult or double sense. It has been alleged by some that as these
oracles are heavenly and divine we should expect to find in them manifold
meanings. They must needs differ from other books. Hence has arisen not
only the doctrine of a double sense, but of a threefold and fourfold sense,
and the rabbis went so far as to insist that there are "mountains of sense
in every word of Scripture." We may readily admit that the Scriptures are
capable of manifold practical applications; otherwise they would not be so
useful for doctrine, correction, and instruction in righteousness (2 Tim.
3:16). But the moment we admit the principle that portions of Scripture
contain an occult or double sense we introduce an element of uncertainty 
in
the sacred volume, and unsettle all scientific interpretation. "If the
Scripture has more than one meaning," says Dr. Owen, "it has no meaning 
at
all," "I hold," says Ryle, "that the words of Scripture were intended to
have one definite sense, and that our first object should be to discover
that sense, and adhere rigidly to it... To say that words do mean a thing
merely because they can be tortured into meaning it is a most 
dishonourable
and dangerous way of handling Scripture." "This scheme of interpretation,"
says Stuart, "forsakes and sets aside the common laws of language. The
Bible excepted, in no other book, treatise, epistle, discourse, or
conversation, ever written, published, or addressed by any one man to his
fellow beings (unless in the way of sport, or with an intention to
deceive), can a double sense be found. There are, indeed, charades,
enigmas, phrases with a double entente, and the like, perhaps, in all
languages; there have been abundance of heathen oracles which were
susceptible of two interpretations; but even among all these there never
has been, and there never was a design that there should be, but one sense
or meaning in reality. Ambiguity of language may be, and has been,
designedly resorted to in order to mislead the reader of hearer, or in
order to conceal the ignorance of soothsayers, or to provide for their
credit amid future exigencies; but this is quite foreign to the matter of a
serious and bona fide double meaning of words. Nor can we for a moments,
without violating the dignity and sacredness of the Scriptures, suppose
that the inspired writers are to be compared to the authors of riddles,
conundrums, enigmas, and ambiguous heathen oracles." (Cited in Milton
Terry, Biblical Hermeneutics: A Treatise on the Interpretation of the Old
and New Testaments, p. 493-494)



Pagans and Politics

The judicial question I raised in Political Polytheism is this: Is the
non-Christian in a Christian nation to be a citizen or a stranger in the
land? This assumes that the civil government is a covenantal organization
that is lawfully established by a self-maledictory oath under the God of
the Bible. Put another way, is it biblically legitimate for Christians to
do what the state of Israel has done and what Islamic nations have done;
covenant nationally with an identified god? If so, then should the
non-Christian be given the right to exercise political sanctions against
Christians? Should he have the right to vote?

The stranger in ancient Israel did not serve as a judge, although he
received all the benefits of living in the land. The political question is
this: By what biblical standard is the pagan to be granted the right to
bring political sanctions against God's people? We recognize that
unbelievers are not to vote in Church elections. Why should they be 
allowed
to vote in civil elections in a covenanted Christian nation? Which judicial
standards will they impose? By what other standard than the Bible?

Gary North, Westminster's Confession: The Abandonment of Van Til's 
Legacy
(Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1991), p. 227.



Politics Fourth?

The first step is to adopt a slogan. Every revolution needs slogans. Here
is mine: politics fourth. First comes personal faith in Jesus Christ as
Lord and Savior (not just Savior). Second comes Church renewal. There can
be no successful reformation of society without first beginning a
reformation of the Church. Third comes family renewal. this involves
pulling your children out of the public schools. fourth comes local
politics. At a minimum, this would involve public protests against
abortion. From there we go to state and national politics. (North,
Political Polytheism: The Myth of Pluralism [ICE, 1989], p. 559.)



PREACHING CHRIST CRUCIFIED

"..that there is no such a thing as preaching Christ and him crucified
un less you preach what is now-a-days is called Calvinism. I have my own
ideas, and those I state boldly. It is a nickname to call it Calvinism;
Calvinism is the gospel, and nothing else."

C. H. Spurgeon, The New Park Street Pulpit, Vol. 1 (1856),
see also Spurgeon's sermons, "A Defense of Calvinism,"
"Election," and "Free Will A Slave."



The Providence of God 

As the providence of God doth, in general, reach to all creatures; so,
after a most special manner, it taketh care of His Church, and disposeth
all things to the good thereof. (The Westminster Confession of Faith
[1647], ch. 5:7)


PSALM ONE

O greatly blessed is the man
Who walketh not astray
In counsel of ungodly men
Nor stands in sinners' way,

Nor sitteth in the scorner's chair
But placeth his delight
Upon GOD's law, and meditates
On His law day and night.

He shall be like a tree that grows
Set by the waterside,
Which in its season yields its fruit,
And green its leaves abide;

And all he does shall prosper well.
The wicked are not so,
But are like the chaff which by the wind
Is driven to and fro.

In judgement therefore shall not stand
Such a ungodly are,
Nor in th' assembly of the just
Shall wicked men appear

Because the way of godly men
Is to Jehovah known;
Whereas the way of wicked men
Shall be quite overthrown.1


1. "Psalm 1A" The Book of Psalms for Singing (Pittsburgh, PA: Crown and
Covenant Publications, 1973). See catalogue.



Psalm Singing

It is the duty of Christians to praise God publickly, by singing of psalms
together in the congregation, and also privately in the family.
(Westminster Directory for the Publick Worship of God [1645])



repentance

Men ought not to content themselves with a general repentance, but it is
every man's duty to endeavour to repent of his particular sins,
particularly. (The Westminster Confession of Faith [1647], ch.15:5)

As there is no sin so small, but it deserves damnation, so there is no sin
so great, that it can bring damnation upon those who truly repent. (The
Westminster Confession of Faith [1647], ch.15:4)


REPENTANCE UNTO LIFE

Repentance unto life is an evangelical grace, the doctrine whereof is to be
preached by every minister of the gospel, as well as that of faith in
Christ. By it a sinner, out of the sight and sense, not only of the danger,
but also of the filthiness and odiousness of his sins, as contrary to the
holy nature and righ teous law of God, and upon the apprehen sion of his
mercy in Christ to such as a re penitent, so grieves for and hates his
sins, as to turn from them all unto God, pur posing and en deavouring to
walk with him in all the ways of his command ments.

- From Chapter 15:1, 2 of
The Westminster Confession of Faith
(Free Presbyterian Publications,  [1647] 1981 edition), pp. 65-66.



The Second Greatest Commandment


The sins forbidden in the second commandment are, all devising,
counselling, commanding, using, and any wise approving, any religious
worship not instituted by God himself, tolerating a false religion; the
making any representation of God, of all or of any of the three persons,
either inwardly in our mind, or outwardly in any kink of image, or likeness
of any creature whatsoever; all worshipping of it, or God in it or by it;
the making of any representation of feigned deities, and all worship of
them, or service belonging to them; all superstitious devices, corrupting
the worship of God, adding to it,of taking from it, whether invented and
taken up of ourselves, or received by tradition from others, though under
the title of antiquity, custom, devotion, good intent, or any other
pretence whatsoever; simony; sacrilege; all neglect, contempt, hindering,
and opposing the worship and ordinances which God hath appointed.
(Westminster Larger Catechism [1648], Answer 109)

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

Separate from False Churches!

The true Church of Christ is distinguished by three particulars, as characteristics: Truth, piety and liberty. Truth in doctrine, piety in worship, and liberty in government. So also, the false church is distinguished by three marks: Heresy, idolatry and tyranny. If any of these obtain in a community, which glories in the name, church, we should necessarily separate ourselves from it. Such a secession preserves the true unity of the church.

From: Turretin as cited in Characteristics of the Witnessing Church by Robert Lusk (1840), p. 87-88.


SEPARATING FROM THE TYRANNY OF FALSE WORSHIP

"This I shall be bold to affirm and maintain, till I see better reason that he (whoever he be) that commands the least tittle of doctrine or discipline, merely ex imperio voluntatis, in his own power and authority, without licence or warrant from scripture, or right reason, (where the scripture hath been silent) though the thing he so commandeth, should happen to be good in itself, yet he, in his so commanding, is not only tyrannical, but antichristian, properly antichristian, encroaching on the royal office of Christ; which is truly high-treason against God, and most properly antichristian" (Melancton in loc Com. de ceremon. humanis., p. 631, 632).

By all which, you see where the idolatry of worship lies. The instituting of any, though the smallest part of worship, in and by our own authority, without scripture-warrant, make it idolatrous, as well as if we worshipped an idol. And hence it is, that God gives his people the same call from this later sort of Romish idolatry; See Rev. 18:4 ("And I heard another voice from heaven, saying, Come out of her, my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues.") as he doth from the more gross pagan idolatry, 2 Cor. 6:17 ("Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you."). So that if that worship you perform to God, be corrupted by a mixture of mere human, doctrinal, symbolical, rites and ceremonies, which God hath not appointed in his worship by the word; though your worship be right for the object, yet it is idolatrous in the manner.

From: John Flavel's A Warning Against Backsliding, False Worship and False Teachers formerly titled Antipharmacum Saluberrimum: Or, A Serious and Seasonable Caveat to all Saints in the Hour of Temptation (Works of the John Flavel, volume 4, London, 1820.)

Flavel was "an eminent Nonconformist divine. Born in Worcestershire about 1627. Educated at University College, Oxford... Ejected for nonconformity 1662. Died at Exeter 1691. He was a man of exemplary piety, in doctrine a Calvinist; an experimental, affectionate, practical, and popular writer." (James Darling, Cyclopedia Bibliographica, 1854, p.1144).



Socialism Brings Famine

...Famine is a commonplace a socialist states... God is continually at
work to destroy unbelieving cultures and to give the world over to the
dominion of His people... God works to over throw the un godly, and
increasingly the world will come under the dominion of Christians, not by
military aggression, but by godly labor, saving, in vestment, and
ori entation toward the future... This is where his tory is going. The
future belongs to the people of God, who obey His laws.

						  - David Chilton,
Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt-Manipulators
(Institute for Christian Economics, 1981), pp. 94-95.




Sproul on PRESUPPOSITIONALISM

"I don't think there has been any school in the
history of the Christian Church that has produced a more devastating,
scintillating, and effective critique of alternative worldviews to
Christianity than the advocates of the Presuppositionalist school... the
disciples of Dr. Cornelius Van Til and company... have been more
effective in exposing the weaknesses and the fallacies in terms of
comprehensive critique of all alternate systems to Christianity, I have
no dispute there..."
  	
- R. C. Sproul from cassette two of The Apologetics Methodology
Debate (versus Dr. Greg L. Bahnsen)


THE Road to Victory

	We are invincible. Even the gates of hell shall not prevail against us if,
that is, we do our job. If we take the Gospel hope beyond, to "the
uttermost parts of the earth," if we "make disciples of all nations," and
if we "rebuild the ancient ruins... raise up the age old foundations... and
repair the breach" by caring for the poor, the afflicted, and the
dispossessed.
	It is time to go to work.
	We may have to go it alone for a time, but that didn't stop David, so it
shouldn't stop us.
	We may have to improvise, utilizing less than perfect conditions and 
less
than qualified workers and less than adequate facilities. That didn't stop
Peter, James, and John, so it shouldn't stop us.
	We may have to go with what we've got-with no support, no notoriety, 
and
no cooperation. That didn't stop Jeremiah, so it shouldn't stop us.
	We may have to go "in weakness and in fear and in much trembling,"
with out "persuasive words of wisdom." That didn't stop the Apostle Paul,
so it shouldn't stop us.
	It is time to go to work.
	Dominion doesn't happen overnight. Victory doesn't come in a day. So 
the
sooner we get started, the better off we'll be.The sooner we get started,
the quicker the victory will come. In order to get from here to there, we
need to set out upon the road-at the very least. There will never be an
ideal time to begin the work of reconstruction, of charity. Money is always
short. Volunteers are always at a premium. Facilities are always either too
small, too inflexible, too expensive, or in the wrong loca tion. There is
never enough time, never enough energy, and never enough re sources.
	So what?
	Our commission is not dependent upon conditions and restriction? Our
commission is dependent only upon the unconditional promises of God's 
Word.
So, we should just go do what we ought to do starting now!

- George Grant, Homelessness: Perpetual Causes, Practical Solutions (Coral
Ridge Ministries: P.O. Box 40, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33302), 1990, p. 35.


Spurgeon on Christmass Keeping

"We have no superstitious regard for times and seasons. Certainly we do
not believe in the present ecclesiastical arrangement called Christmas: first,
because we do not believe in the mass at all, but abhor it, whether it be said
or sung in Latin or in English; and, secondly, because we find no scriptural
warrant for observing any day as the birthday of the Savior; and,
consequently, its observance is a superstition, because not of divine
authority." (Spurgeon, Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit, p. 697)



Spurgeon on Christ's Love

I feel that, if I could live a thousand lives, I would like to live them
all for Christ, and I should even then fell that they were all too little a
return for His great love to me. (Spurgeon cited in The Forgotten Spurgeon
by Iain Murray, p. 20)



Spurgeon on Eschatology

David was not a believer in the theory that the world will grow worse and
worse, and that the dispensation will wind up with general darkness, and
idolatry. Earth's sun is to go down amid tenfold night if some of our
prophetic brethren are to be believed. Not so do we expect, but look for a
day when the dwellers in all lands shall learn righteousness, shall trust
in the Saviour, shall worship thee alone O God,"and shall glorify thy
name." The modern notion has greatly damped the zeal of the church for
missions, and the sooner it is shown to be unscriptural the better for the
cause of God. It neither consorts with prophecy, honours God, nor inspires
the church with ardour. (Spurgeon cited in Gary DeMar and Peter Leithart,
The Reduction of Christianity: A Biblical Response to Dave Hunt [Dominion
Press/American Vision Press, 1988], p. 59.)


syncretism

The same thing happens when the preaching is slanted in another way, 
namely
that of general atonement: God loves you. A "gentle Jesus" is then held up
to the people, and in this way, too, the heart is cut out of the gospel.
For a long time already, psalms or revenge have had no place. It is as if
the royal attributes of the Christ, who subdues His enemies under His feet,
have been taken away. One lives by one's favorite texts. With those who
restrict the covenant to the elect, as well as those who teach a general
atonement, the continuity between old and new covenant is no longer
visible. "Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law" (Gal, 3:13) is then
used to do away with the fact of covenant vengeance. in this was a gospel
of peace is spread throughout the world, which in fact creates or suggests
a false peace... If an abridged gospel is presented, in which all is bright
and beautiful, then the respect for God's Word diminishes automatically.
Insight into the consequences of the Word concerning the broader matters 
of
state, church and society, suffers as a result... Many "evangelicals" lack
recognition of the fact that they are following liberal theology at a
distance. They have been taken in by the "God is love gospel"... The fact
that the Holiness Pentecostal movement penetrated the Roman Catholic 
church
and even attracted the attention of the World Council of Churches, is proof
that we are dealing with a form of contemporary syncretism, which is
considered acceptable and not dangerous. (Dr. C. van der Waal. The
Covenantal Gospel [Alberta: Inheritance, 1990], pp. 166-67.)

THAT'S LIFE

"...I can tell you that there is a certain amount of disorder in life.
Anybody who studies a great deal will know that the books are scat tered
all around your room... that means that you are alive and that you use 
your
books! There are places where books are perfectly orderly all the time but
nobody uses them. So [also] in cemeteries there is per fect order, nobody's
out of line - but in a house hold of many children its not going to be
per fect, there are going to be toys on the floor... which is a SIGN OF
LIFE!"

- From the cassette
The 'Almighty Buck' by Steve Schlissel

Not to mention cassettes, software, videos, tracts, and sundry other
use ful tools in seeking the will of our Lord-.ed.



True Liberty of Conscience

God alone is Lord of the conscience, and hath left it free from the
doctrines and commandments of men, which are, in any thing, contrary to 
His
Word: or beside it, in matters of faith, or worship. So that, to believe
such doctrines, or to obey such commands, out of conscience, is to betray
true liberty of conscience: and the requiring of an implicit faith, and an
absolute and blind obedience, is to destroy liberty of conscience, and
reason also. They who, upon pretence of Christian liberty, do practice any
sin, or or cherish any lust, do thereby destroy the end of Christian
liberty, which is, that being delivered out of the hands of our enemies, we
might serve the Lord without fear, in holiness and righteousness before
Him, all the days of our life. (The Westminster Confession of Faith [1647],
ch. 20:2-3)




THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AGAINST PORNOGRAPHY, ABORTION AND CONTRACEPTIVES


REVISED STATUTES OF THE UNITED STATES PASSED AT THE FIRST SESSION OF THE 43rd CONGRESS, 1873-74. PUBLISHED BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT'S PRINTING OFFICE IN 1878.



SEC. 2491.  All persons are prohibited
from importing into the United States, from any foreign country, any
obscene book, pamphlet, paper, writing, advertisement, circular, print,
picture, drawing, or other representation, figure, or image on or of paper
or other material, or any cast, instrument, or other article of an immoral
nature, or any drug or medicine, or any article whatever, for the
prevention of conception, or for causing unlawful abortion.  No invoice or
package whatever, or any part of one, in which any such articles are
contained shall be admitted to entry; and all invoices and packages
whereof any such articles shall compose a part are liable to be proceeded
against, seized, and forfeited by due course of law.  All such prohibited
articles in the course of importation shall be detained by the officer of
customs, and proceedings taken against the same as prescribed in the
following section: Provided, That the drugs hereinbefore mentioned, when
imported in bulk and not put up for any of the purposes hereinbefore
specified, are excepted from the operation of this section. [See 1785.]





Was Calvin a theonomist?

"Was Calvin a theonomist?" These sermons reveal clearly that the answer 
is
yes. (Gary North in Jordan, ed. The Covenant Enforced: Sermons on
Deuteronomy 27 and 28 by John Calvin [ICE, 1990], vii.)



WHERE ARE THE LORD'S ENEMIES?

	The field of Christianity is the world. The Christian cannot be satisfied
so long as any human activity is either opposed to Christianity or out of
all connection with Christianity. Christianity must prevade not merely all
na tions, but also all of human thought. The Christian, therefore, cannot
be in different to any branch of earnest endeavor.... The Kingdom must be
ad vanced not merely extensively, but also intensively. The Church must
seek to conquer not merely every man for Christ, but also the whole of
man....
	We may preach with all the fervor of a reformer and yet succeed only 
in
winning a straggler here and there, if we permit the whole collective
thought of the nation or of the world to be controlled by ideas which, by
the resist less force of logic, prevent Christianity from being regarded as
anything more than a harmless delusion. Under such circumstances, what 
God
de sires us to do is to destroy the obstacle at its root.... What is today
a matter of academic speculation begins tomorrow to move armies and pull
down em pires.... The Church has no right to be so absorbed in helping the
individ ual that she forgets the world....
	Is it not far easier to be an earnest Christian if you confine your
attention to the Bible and do not risk being led astray by the thought of
the world? We answer, of course it is easier.... just as it is easier to be
a good soldier in comfortable winter quarters than it is on the field of
battle. You save your own soul - but the Lord's enemies remain in
possession of the field.1

	Machen proceeded to call this the "task of transforming" all human 
thought
"until it becomes subservient to the gospel." Machen did not ex clude
political thinking and policies from such subservience. He could not be
satisfied as long as any human activity was opposed to Christianity. The
Lord's enemies must not remain in possession of the field, but rather the
whole world and the whole man must be made subject to God speaking in 
His
word. There can be no neutrality anywhere: "He that is not with us is
against us. Modern culture is a mighty force. It is either subservient to
the gospel or else it is the deadliest enemy of the gospel."2 Machen found
the moral stan dard which governed all men in all areas of life in the law
of god: "It is per fectly true that the law of God is over all. There is
not one law of God for the Christian and another law of God for the
non-Christian."3

1. Greg Bahnsen in Theonomy An Informed Response (Tyler, TX: ICE, 
1991), p.
92, cites J. Gresham Machen from "Christianity and Culture," Education,
Christianity, and the State (Jefferson, MD: The Trinity Foundation, [1913]
1987), pp. 49-50, 51, 52.
	2. Ibid., p. 57
	3. "The Necessity of the Christian School" (1934), ibid., p. 77.


The Westminster Divines and Covenanted Uniformity

The four parts of the covenanted uniformity at which the Scots aimed -
"confessing of faith, form of church government, directory of worship, and
catechising," were an integrated system, and to that extent they were
equally important to churchmanship; but special urgency attached to the
Directory for Worship and church government not only because of the 
need in
English parishes, but also because church discipline was central to the
Scots' understanding of the Church... That represents a remarkable
achievement for the Scots Commissioners in an English ecclesiastical
Assembly. They had almost complete success on all the major points for
their programme of covenanted uniformity. The one exception was the 
failure
to get their system of church government legally recognized as of divine
right. The claim was incorporated into Article30 of the Confession, but it
was never accepted by Parliament, and this was one of the two articles to
be omitted when the Westminster Confession was re-affirmed by the 
Rump
Parliament just before the Restoration. There was no way that any
ecclesiology could have carried a claim to jus divinum past that English
Parliament. (R. S. Paul, The Assembly of the Lord: Politics and Religion in
the Westminster Assembly and the 'Grand Debate' [T. & T. Clark, 1985], pp.
438, 516)


The Westminster Divines on Holy-Days

"There is no day commanded in scripture to be kept holy under the gospel
but the Lord's day, which is the Christian Sabbath. Festival days, vulgarity
called Holy-days, having no warrant in the word of God, are not to be
continued." (Westminister Assemblies, Directory for Public Worship,
Appendix-Touching Days and Places for Public Worship)


Westminster Divines on Worship, The

...God is to be worshipped every where in spirit and in truth; as in private
families daily, and in secret each one by himself; so more solemnly in the
publick assemblies, which are not carelessly or willfully to be neglected or
forsaken, when God, by his word or providence, calleth thereunto.(WCF
Chap 21 Sect. 6 )

Finally checking one more source lets look at the Larger Catechism Q 109
"The sins forbidden in the second commandment are, all devising,
counselling, commanding, using, AND ANY WISE APPROVING, any
religious worship not instituted by God himself; TOLERATING a false
religion...corrupting the worship of God, adding to it, of taking from it,
whether invented and taken up of ourselves, or received by good intent, or
any other pretence whatsoever..."





PLEASE EXCUSE THE MESS BELOW. 
WE THOUGHT THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO HAVE THE FOLLOWING QUOTATIONS
AVAILABLE IN AN UNORGANIZED STATE RATHER THAN NOT AT ALL.
WE WILL BE ORGANINZING THESE ITEMS WHEN WE GET A CHANCE. WE HOPE THAT YOU FIND THEM HELPFUL.
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ Q. What are the decrees of God? A. The decrees of God are, his eternal purpose,, according to the counsel of his will, whereby, for his own glory, he hath foreordained whatsoever comes to pass. (Westminster Shorter Catechism [1648], Question 7) Q. How does Christ execute the office of a king? A. Christ executes the office of a king, in subduing us to himself, in ruling, and defending us,and in restraining and conquering all his and our enemies. (Westminster Shorter Catechism [1648], Question 26) Q. Where is the moral law summarily comprehended? A. The moral law is summarily comprehended in the ten commandments. (Westminster Shorter Catechism [1648], Question 41) Q. What is Sin? A. Sin is any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the law of God. (Westminster Shorter Catechism [1648], Question 14) Fathers and mothers, do not forget that children learn more by the eye than by the ear. No school will make such deep marks on character as home. The schoolmasters will not imprint on their minds as much as they will pick up at your fireside. Imitation is a far stronger principle with children than memory. What they see has a much stronger effect on their minds than what they are told. (J.C. Ryle, The Duties of Parents, p. 7) ...it is not irreligious, curious, or superfluous, but essentially wholesome and necessary, for a Christian to know, whether or not the will does any thing in those things which pertain unto Salvation. Nay, let me tell you, this is the very hinge upon which our discussion turns. It is the very heart of the subject. (Luther, Bondage of the Will) "...reveals more about the heritage of freedom we enjoy in this country than an entire shelf of conventional history books." George Grant on America's Christian History: The Untold Story by DeMar. The Psalms were adhered to as the sole matter of praise in the Reformed or Calvinistic Churches for more than a century and a half after the Reformation... into Britain... Every householder was required by enactment of Parliament to have in his house a Bible and Psalmbook in the vernacular language for the better instruction of themselves and their families in the knowledge of God; each person under the penalty of ten pounds. (John McNaughter, ed., The Psalms in Worship [SWRB], pp. 552-553.) The catholicity of the Psalter follows logically upon the demonstration of the proposition that, under God's design, the Psalms were inspired and providentially collected to be the manual of praise for the Church in all ages... the Psalter belongs exclusively to no one age of the Church... the Psalter belongs exclusively to no sect or denomination of the Church... It is the supreme advantage of the Psalm-singer that his songs are from God... On the other hand, it must ever remain the embarrassment of those who use uninspired compositions in the praise of God that their hymns are at best but human conceptions of the truth... They betray almost certainly in letter as in spirit a denominational bias. Uninspired hymns are, and of necessity must be sectarian... it follows that such hymns are subversive of the unity of faith; for by all the power of song to stir the heart and mold the thought and make theology they accentuate and perpetuate the differences that divide the Church. There is something truly anomalous in a Church preaching the unity of believers and praying the prayer of Christ that "all may be one," and at the same time singing the songs that by their sectarian bias and denominationalism foster the divisions thus deplored. Are such hymns necessary? We cannot believe that they are. (McNaughter, ed., The Psalms in Worship [SWRB], pp. 394-395.) ...the Church and State are two distinct independent societies, each having a distinct government of its own, self-sufficient and authoritative in its own province,and with reference to its own functions and objects. (Cunningham, Discussions on Church Principles [SWRB], p.208) Still Waters Revival Books PRESENTS The Quote of the Month (November 1991) "(D)avid is the Old Testament type of the inviolable majesty of Christ; and therefore his imprecations are prophetic of the final doom of all the hardened enemies of Christ and His Church; and in this sense the Christian appropriates them in prayer. Thus turned to account, they are a wholesome antidote to the religious sentimentality of our time, which shuts its eyes to the truth that God's wrath against impenitent despisers of His grace is at once necessary and salutary;-necessary, because demanded by the divine justice; salutary, because conducing to the victory and consummation of the kingdom of God. As such, they are simply an expansion of the prayer, Thy Kingdom come. For the Kingdom of God comes not only by the showing of mercy to the penitent, but also by the executing of judgement on the impenitent." (Kurtz, Zur Theol. ed. Psalmen, p. 173) ...(C)ertainly, they (the imprecatory Psalms-RB) ought never to be sung but with fear and trembling.... It has been justly said that "in a deep sense of moral evil, more perhaps than in anything else, abides a saving knowledge of God." (Dr. Arnold's life, p. 662) There is "a hatred of them that hate God," which is the invariable accompaniment and indispensable token of the love of God in the heart (Ps. 139:21-22). And sin is to be looked upon not only as a disease to be loathed, but as a violation of law which calls for punishment. As powerful witnesses for the truth that sin is hateful to God and deserving of His wrath and everlasting curse,-a truth which the world would fain forget,-the Imprecatory Psalms must be accounted worthy of their place in the divine Manual of Praise. William Binnie, The Psalms: Their History, Teachings, and Use. (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1886), pp. 288-289. A major and indispensable aspect of our commitment to Christ involves our membership in, attendance at, worship in, and service through the local church. Church attendance and membership is expected and obligated on several grounds... (Ken Gentry, The Greatness of the Great Commission [ICE, 1990], p. 113) ...no disestablishment of religion as such is possible in any society. A church can be disestablished, and a particular religion can be supplanted by another, but the change is simply to another religion. Since the foundations of las are inescapably religious, no society exists without a religious foundation or without a law-system which codifies the morality of its religion... there can be no tolerance in a law-system for another religion. Toleration is a device used to introduce a new law-system as a prelude to a new intolerance... Every law-system must maintain its existence by hostility to every other law-system and to alien religious foundations or else it commits suicide. (R. J. Rushdoony, The Institutes of Biblical Law [Presbyterian & Reformed Publ., 1973], p. 5-6) Postmillennialism will again prevail, however, because it is the truth of God and His enscriptured word. As an eschatology of victory, it will inspire men with the power of God, and, as with great saints of old, and the Puritans of yesteryears, lead again and more enduringly to the triumph of Christ in every area, bringing every sphere of thought and action into captivity to Christ. (From Rushdoony's Introduction to J. Marcellus Kik's An Eschatology of Victory, [Presbyterian and Reformed], ix) What is a covenant? God comes before man and "lays down the law" - His law. Man must either conform to God by obeying His law or else be destroyed. As He told Adam, "Eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, and you will die." God deals with men as a king deals with his subjects. his covenant is to prosper us when we obey and curse us when we rebel. (North & DeMar, Christian Reconstruction What It Is, What Is Isn't, p. 56) Two legitimate forms of godly vengeance exist: First, the absolute and perfect justice of God finally and totally administers perfect justice. History culminates in Christ's triumph, and eternity settles all scores. Second, the authorities ordained by God, parents, pastors, civil authorities, and others, have a duty to exercise the justice and vengeance of God. As themselves sinners, they can never do this perfectly, but imperfect justice can be justice still. A cloudy day cannot be called midnight; imperfect justice is not injustice. (R. J. Rushdoony, The Institutes of Biblical Law [Presbyterian & Reformed Publ., 1973], p. 123) ...that we seek not the things that are ours but those which are of the Lord's will and will serve to advance his glory. This is also evidence of great progress: that, almost forgetful of ourselves, surely subordinating our self concern, we try faithfully to devote our zeal to God and his commandments. (John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion [Westminster, 1960 ed.], vol. 1, pp. 690-91.) This Sabbath is then kept holy unto the Lord, when men, after a due preparing of their hearts, and ordering of their common affairs before-hand, do not only observe an holy rest, all the day, from their own works, words and thoughts about their worldly employments and recreations,but also are then taken up, the whole time, in the public and private exercises of His worship, and in the duties of necessity and mercy. (The Westminster Confession of Faith, Chapter 21, Section 8.) The Law of God must be perpetual. There is no abrogation of it, nor amendment of it. It is not to be toned down or adjusted to our fallen condition; but every one of the Lord's righteous judgements abideth tor ever. (Charles Spurgeon, Spurgeon's Sovereign Grace Sermons [Still Waters Revival Books, reprinted 1990], p. 54.) The worship of God is central. The central issue therefore is this: Which God should mankind worship? The God of the Bible or a god of man's imagination? (North & DeMar, Christian Reconstruction What It Is, What Is Isn't, p. 39) We know that we have come to know him if we obey his commands. The man who says, "I know him," but does not do what he commands is a liar, and the truth is not in him. (1 John 2:3, NIV) As Dr. F. Nigel Lee has said, "It is clear that the best place for a Presbyterian infant is inside the sanctuary at the time of his baptism and for ever thereafter - and not in a church nursery outside of the sanctuary and removed from his parents under the care of a hired nurse." Dr. lee advocates the same scheme outlined above (he refers to it as a "babies' room" rather than a "crying room"). He goes on to explain the importance of such a room: "Only when a Presbyterian baptized in infancy has faithfully lived in the house of the Lord from cradle to grave, has the covenant of grace really been correctly understood throughout ( 1 Cor. 7:3-5, 12-14; Eph. ^:1-4; Ps. 92: 13-14). (R. Bacon, Revealed to Babes: Children in the Worship of God [Old Path Publications, 1993], p. 63) Thus the Christian's attitude toward the homosexual should parallel his attitude toward other criminals. While not wanting them to be free to practice their sins without equitable punishment, the Christian still must have the compassion to evangelize those who face far worse punishment before the throne of God. The Christian should be concerned about purging social evil from his land, as well as to bring all who well repent to faith in Jesus Christ. To pit one duty against the other is to fail to be subject to what the whole Bible has to say on homosexuality. Homosexuality is not a civil right. We are not obligated to respect its practice and refrain from intervening against those who engage in it. Nut neither is homosexuality a bar to entering the kingdom of God through conversion. (Greg Bahnsen, Homosexuality: A Biblical View [Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Company, 1978], p. 134) ...the subject matter is presented in global terms. It is presented against the background of a world in conflict. The recruit is made to feel that there is a great battle going on all aver the world. That this includes his own country, his own town, his own neighborhood, the block of flats in which he lives, the factory of office where he works. He is made to feel also that the period of history in which he happens to be living is a decisive one and theat he personally has a decisive role to play. He is part of a great, worldwide movement which is challenged on all sides, confronted by an implacable enemy and involved in a battle which will decide the course of history for generations ahead. (D. Hyde, Dedication and Leadership [Notre Dame, 1966], p. 52) Men cannot give a meaning to history that they themselves lack, nor can they honor a past which indicts them for their present failures (R. J. Rushdoony, A Biblical Philosophy of History, p. 135). To study the past does indeed liberate us from the present, from the idols of our own market place. But I think it liberates us from the past too... The unhistorical are usually without thinking about it, enslaved to a fairly recent past (C. S. Lewis, De Descriptione Temporum). Both quotes above cited in America: The First 350 Years by Steve Wilkins. This informative tape set and outline can be obtained from Covenant Publications, 224 Auburn Ave., Monroe, LA. 71201 USA. It is also an excellent home school and education resource. Still Waters Revival Books PRESENTS The Quote of the Month (Nov., 1992) A THEONOMIC KEY: DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN MORAL AND CEREMONIAL LAW The failure to recognize the moral/ceremonial distinction is a serious literary, ethical and theological mistake on the part of critics. Once we clearly understand what a "ceremonial" laws is,3 we should readily acknowledge the theological necessity of countenancing such a category. Critics often miss the fact that categories of the Old Testament law did not need to be written out in delineated literary subsections in order for them to be, nevertheless, clearly distinguishable by the Israelites. The objection of critics about the moral/ceremonial breakdown invents a difficulty where none hardly existed. With the coming of New Covenant revelation which helps us understand even better the meaning and purpose of Old Covenant com mands, the cogency and necessity of something like the moral/ceremonial distinction becomes all the more appar ent. It accounts for Paul's insistence on submission to case-law ("civil") provisions of the Old Testament (e.g., 1 Tim. 5:18), but refusal to see other ("ceremonial") laws as obli gatory (e.g., Gal. 2:3; 5:2, 6). Paul could do both without be ing in the least bit logically inconsistent. If the moral/ceremonial distinction is not recognized, then one renders the New Testament scriptures contradictory with respect to the Old Testament law. Paul declares that the law is holy and good (Rom. 7:12), and yet elsewhere that the law (in another sense, obviously) is a tutor that we are no longer under (Gal. 3:24-25; cf. 1 Cor. 9:20-21).4 5. A "ceremonial" (or restorative) law is one which has been "put out of gear" by the redemptive mission of Jesus Christ and redefinition of the New Covenant people of God - rather than a law (such as the case laws) which is differently applied today because of cultural differences. The latter category of commands would include even New Testament com mands (such as the story of the good Samaritan) which have nothing whatsoever to do with the monumental change brought in redemptive history by the work of Christ. 5. Greg Bahnsen. No Other Standard: Theonomy and Its Critics (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1991), pp. 96-97. The responsibility of the civil magistrate is not limited to what respects his own well-being. He finds, from the revealed will of God, that there is another society of Divine appointment, co-ordinate with the state, but different from it in its nature and in its powers. He learns that the great aim of this society is to advance the interests of the Gospel among men, and to promote the cause of truth and righteousness in the world. He recongnises the visible Church of Christ as an institute appointed by Him for promoting His purposes of grace on earth, by means purely spiritual, and within a province altogether distinct from that of the state. In separate character and province, assigned by God to the Church and the state respectively, the civil magistrate is able to see the ground laid for co-operation between the two, without the risk of interference and collision. In the common ends which in some respects they contemplate or promote together, he acknowledges their mutual adaptation the one to the other, as friends and allies. Further still, in the fact that they are both ordinances of God, equally appointed by him, and equally responsible to Him, the civil magistrate is able to see that they have duties one to another in the way of promoting each others interests as fellow-workers in the same Master's service... Still further, this evidence of the Divine sanction given to the support and recognition of the Church by the state might be very greatly augmented by a consideration of those predictions in the regard to the future or millennial state of the Church, in which kings and kingdoms are especially represented as in the latter days bringing their gold and their honor unto it, and becoming the great instruments of promoting its spiritual interests. (James Bannerman, The Church of Christ [SWRB, 1869 reprinted 1991], pp. 131,132,133.) Certain ignorant persons, not understanding this distinction cast out the whole law of Moses, and bid farewell to the two Tables of the Law. For they think it obviously alien to Christians to hold to a doctrine that contains the "dispensation of death" (cf. II Cor. 3:7). Banish this wicked thought from our minds... we are not to refer solely to one age David's statement that the life of a righteous man is a continual meditation upon the law (Ps. 1:2), for it is just as applicable to every age, even to the end of the world. (John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion [Westminster, 1960 ed.], pp. 361-362.) Capital Crimes in the Massachusetts Body of Liberties (1641) 1. If any man after legal conviction shall have or worship any other god, but the Lord god, he shall be put to death. 8. If any man lies with mankind as he lies with a woman, both of them have committed abomination, they both shall surely be put to death. 9. If any person commits adultery with a married or espoused wife, the adulterer and adulteress shall surely be put to death. Listed on pp. 95-96 of the Journal of Christian Reconstruction: Symposium on Puritanism and Law (Chalcedon, 1978-79). A not-well-know- publication of the Westminster Assembly is crucial here - namely, "The Directory for Family Worship." ...An indication of the seriousness with which the Puritans viewed this duty is given by an introductory statement, added by the assembly when it adopted the measure. We read: "...the Assembly doth require and appoint ministers and ruling elders to make diligent search and enquiry, in the congregations committed to their charge respectively, whether there be among them any family or families which use to neglect this necessary duty; and if any such family be found, the head of the family is to be first admonished privately to amend his fault... after which reproof, if he still be found to neglect family worship, let him be, for his obstinacy in such offence, suspended and debarred from the Lord's Supper, as being firstly esteemed unworthy to communicate therein, till he amend." The conducting and exercise of family worship was made an object of the discipline of the Scottish Church. This is not at all out of character and harmony with the general Puritan conviction with respect to family worship. Singular in this regard was the Puritan conception of the family or household as a "little church." Perkins described the family a a little church, Gouge called it the "seminary of the Church and commonwealth..." and Baxter characterized the as "a church... a society of Christians combined for the better worshipping and serving God." Lewis Bayly taught that "what the preacher is n the pulpit, the same the Christian householder is in his house." He was quoting Augustine.In the morning they gathered to call upon the name of God before they began the works of their respective callings. In the evening, when the family had known the blessing of God upon the labor of the day, they prayed for the protection of God through the night. (R. Flinn, "The Puritan Family and the Christian Economy," Journal of Christian Reconstruction: Symposium of the Family, Winter, 1977-78.) It is to be understood that the Bible was the central reading matter in all households, for these people were Protestants who shared Luther's belief that printing was "God's highest and extremest act of Grace, whereby the business of the Gospel may be driven forward." Of course, the business of the Gospel may be driven forward in books other than the Bible, a for example in the famous Bay Psalm Book, printed in 1640 and generally regarded as America's first best seller. (Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death-Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business, [A Penguin Book, 1985], pp. 32.) The whole counsel of God, concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man's salvation, faith, and life, is either expressly set down in scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from scripture: unto which nothing at any time is to be added, whether by new revelations of the Spirit, or traditions of men. (The Westminster Confession of Faith [1647], 1:6.) The inference, then, plainly is that no church can hope to maintain a homogeneous character; no church can be secure either of purity or peace, for a single year; nay, no church can effectually guard against the highest degrees of corruption and strife, without some test of truth, explicitly agreed upon, and adopted by her in her ecclesiastical capacity: something recorder, something publicly known, something capable of being referred to when most needed, which not merely this of that private member supposes to have been received, but to which the church as such has agreed to adhere, as a bond of union. In other words, a church, in order to maintain the "unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace and love," must have a creed - a written creed - to which she has formally given her assent, and to a conformity to which her ministrations are pledged. As long as such a test is faithfully applied, she cannot fail of being in some good degree united and harmonious. And when nothing of the kind is employed, I see not how she can be expected, without a miracle, to escape all the evils of discord and corruption. (Samuel Miller, Doctrinal Integrity: The Utility and Importance of Creeds and Confessions, [PHP reprint., 1989], pp. 10-11.) A Seminary education is not a guarantee of the candidate's fitness for the Christian ministry... Said Miller: "Unless we examine with caution, and select with sacred care; unless we take counsel of our fears, as well as of our sanguine hopes; unless we learn the unwelcome art of repressing the forward, and rejecting the unworthy - as well as the more pleasing task of encouraging the modest and the timid; we shall, in the midst of all our honest zeal for the cause of Christ, be in danger of filling the Church with drones and pests, with clerical ignorance, imbecility, heresy, and carnal ambition, while we fondly dream that we are preparing faithful laborer for her service (Reed citing Samuel Miller in his introductory essay to An Able and Faithful Ministry). What Christian Reconstructionists argue is that virtually all schools of biblical interpretation today, and too often in the past (excepting only the Puritans), have been far closer to dispensationalism's hermeneutic principle - 'the commands of the Law are presumed to be no longer binding except where the New Testament repeats or ratifies them'- than to the theonomists' hermeneutical principle, also correctly summarized by Bowman: '[T]he commands of the Law are Presumed to be binding today except where the New Testament modifies them or sets them aside in some manner.' This is why Christian reconstructionism does represent a break with traditional Protestant theology, not in the details of theology - our distinguishing theological beliefs have all been preached before within orthodox circles - but in our packaging of a unique, comprehensive system: Predestination, covenant theology, biblical law, Cornelius Van Til's presuppositional apologetics, and postmillennialism (North, Tools of Dominion, p. 14). "...the defenders of the Byzantine tradition ought to desist from all statements suggesting or implying that defenders of any other view necessarily risk a heterodox view of scripture" (Carson, The King James Version Debate: A Plea for Realism, p.123). "The English word 'creed' is derived from the Latin 'credo,' which simply means 'I believe.' ...Anyone who thinks of God in a particular way has a 'encreeded' a view of God, whether or not this 'creed' is put in writing." From: The Usefulness of Creeds by Ken Gentry. "Family worship is the most ancient as well as the holiest of institutions. It is not an innovation against which people are readily prejudiced; it began with the world itself. It is evident that the first worship which the first man and his children paid to God could be nothing else that family worship, since they constituted the only family which then existed on the earth. 'Then,' says Scripture, 'began men to call upon the name of the Lord.' Family worship must indeed have been for a long time the only form of worship addressed to God in common; for as the earth still remained to be peopled, the head of every family went to live separately; and, as a high priest unto God in the place which was alloted to him, he offered unto the Lord of the whole earth the homage due to him, with his wife, his sons and daughters, his man-servants and maid-servants." From the bound photocopy or cassette: Family Worship: Motives and Directions for Domestic Piety by J. H. Merle d'Aubigne But there is a spiritual light required, that we may discern the glory of this worship, and have thereby an experience of its power and efficacy in reference unto the ends of its appointment. This the church of believers hath. They see it as it is a blessed means of giving glory unto God, and of receiving gracious communications from him; which are the ends of all the divine institutions of worship: and they have therein such an experience of its efficacy, as gives rest, and peace, and satisfaction, unto their souls. For they find, that as their worship directs them unto a blessed view, by faith, of God in his ineffable existence, with the glorious actings of each person in the dispensation of grace, which fills their hearts with joy unspeakable; so also, that all graces are exercised, increased, and strengthened in the observance of it, with love and delight. But all light into, all perceptions of this glory, all experience of its power, was, amongst the most, lost in the world. I intend, in all these instances the time of the papal apostasy. Those who had the conduct of religion could discern no glory in these things, nor obtain any experience of their power. Be the worship what it will, they can see no glory in it, nor did it give any satisfaction to their minds; for having no light to discern its glory, they could have no experience of its power and efficacy. What, then, shall they do? The notion must be retained, that divine worship is to be beautiful and glorious. But in the spiritual worship of the gospel they could see nothing thereof; wherefore they thought necessary to make a glory for it, or to dismiss it out of the world, and set up such an image of it as might appear beautiful unto their fleshly minds, and give them satisfaction. To this end they set their inventions on work to find out ceremonies, vestments, gestures, ornaments, music, altars, images, paintings, with prescriptions of great bodily veneration. This pageantry they call the beauty, the order, the glory, of divine worship. This is that which they see and feel, and which, as they judge, doth dispose their minds unto devotion. Without it they know not how to pay any reverence unto God himself; and when it is wanting, whatever be the life, the power, the spirituality of the worship in the worshippers--whatever be its efficacy unto all the proper ends of it--however it be ordered according unto the prescription of the word,--it is unto them empty, indecent; they can neither see beauty nor glory in it. This light and experience being lost, the introduction of beggarly elements and carnal ceremonies in the worship of the church, with attempts to render it decorous and beautiful by superstitious rites and observances,--wherewith it hath been defiled and corrupted, as it was and is in the Church of Rome,--was nothing but the setting up a deformed image in the room of it. And this they are pleased withal. The beauty and glory which carving, and painting, and embroidered vestures, and musical incantations, and postures of veneration, do give unto divine service, they can see and feel; and, in their own imagination, are sensibly excited unto devotion by them. But hereby, instead of representing the true glory of the worship of the gospel, wherein it excels that under the Old Testament, they have rendered it altogether inglorious in comparisonof it; for all the ceremonies and ornaments which they have invented for that end come unspeakably short, for beauty, order, and glory, of what was appointed by God himself in the temple,--scarce equalling what was among the Pagans. It will be said, that the things whereunto we assign the glory of this worship are spiritual and invisible. Now, this is not that which is inquired after; but that whose beauty we may behold, and be affected with: and this may consist in the things which we decry, at least in some of them;--though I must say, if there be glory in any of them, the more they are multiplied the better it must needs be. But this is that which we plead:--men, being not able, by the light of faith, to discern the glory of things spiritual and invisible, do make images of them unto themselves, as gods that may go beforethem; and these they are affected withal: but the worship of the church is spiritual, and the glory of it is invisible unto eyes of flesh. So both our Saviour and the apostles do testify in the celebration of it: "We are come unto mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, to the general assembly and church of the first-born, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect, and to Jesus the mediator of the new covenant, and to the blood of sprinkling, that speaketh better things than that of Abel," Heb 12:22-24. The glory of this assembly, though certainly above that of organs, and pipes, and crucifixes, and vestments, yet doth not appear unto the sense or imagination of men. That which I design here is, to obviate the meretricious allurements of the Roman worship, and the pretences of its efficacy to excite devotion and veneration by its beauty and decency. The whole of it is but a deformed image of that glory which they cannot behold. To obtain, and preserve in our hearts, an experience of the power and efficacy of that worship of God which is in spirit and in truth, as unto all the real ends of divine worship, is that alone which will secure us. Whilst we do retain right notions of the proper object of gospel worship, and of our immediate approach by it thereunto,--of the way and manner of that approach, through the mediation of Christ, and assistance of the Spirit; whilst we keep up faith and love unto their due exercise in it(wherein, on our part, the life of it doth consist), preserving an experience of the spiritual benefit and advantage which we receive thereby, we shall not easily be inveigled to relinquish them all, and give up ourselves unto the embraces of this lifeless image.* *Owen, John. "The Chamber of Imagery in the Church of Rome Laid Open; or, An Antidote Against Popery," from Sermons To The Nation in Works volume 8, (Banner of Truth reprint), pp. 558-560. Again, although the practice of the Levitical elements has most certainly been abolished by God, the usefulness of their knowledge has not been. It is most sad to see the confusion which exists when these are confounded. Some, acknowledging the usefulness of the knowledge of these symbolic things, falsely conclude that they may appropriate the practice of them into evangelical worship. This type of thinking is usually motivated by a desire for musical instrumentation, etc., in evangelical worship. This is appropriation is without command, inference, or example as being an element of the new covenant cultus. They suppose that these things assist their worship, because they make a pleasant impression on them, which they assume is a devotional spirit. This impression, however, may be nothing more than a sensuous pleasing of their constitutional nature(1 Sam. 16:14-23), which may counterfeit as a Spirit caused impression on their souls. Similar arguments have been forwarded by advocates of images and statues for assistance in worship. In this case, the only thing that can hold back the introduction of incense, censers, the erection of altars, the lighting of candles and other various abominations into Christian worship, is human authority. Such an authority is insufficient, as a glance at Rome confirms. Others, on the other hand, belittle the cognitive value of these Levitical elements because of the abrogation of their practice, and therefore conclude that it is necessary--since God has not given us a "new testament" song book--to take it upon themselves to introduce uninspired compositions into evangelical worship. The inference they make is, that God has delegated to the will of uninspired men the accomplishment of what He voluntarily left incomplete! This type of inference, besides being incipient liberalism, is characterized by a dispensational type of mind-set: it overemphasizes the discontinuities between the testaments, because it refuses to see the solidarity of God's work in redemptive history. They cannot, therefore, appreciate the sufficiency of God's Psalter. These two opposite perspectives, however, meet in the fact that they, at least by their actions, deny the sufficiency and final authority of the word of God for directing Christian worship. Today the idea of Christian worship is generally amorphous. Christians may have a definite idea what they are saved from, but the worship they are saved to, in this life, is often only the nebulous result of human wisdom. History shows it has not always been so. By God's blessing, may history repeat itself in this regard! The Reformation Observer at 11124 NE Halsey, Box 411,, Portland, OR, 97220 USA (Volume 1, No. 2). The following quote is regarding the book Far From Rome. As Carlos Eire points out (on page 188) in his masterful Reformation study War Against the Idols, Guillaume (William) Farel, an eminent 16th century leader of Reformation in France and Switzerland (and friend and mentor to John Calvin), believed that: "Catholic worship is evil, sinful and dangerous. It is not merely corrupt piety, it is false religion, and as such can bring damnation." Today, many have forgotten the great gains made during the Reformation. Gains made at great cost, laid on a biblical foundation and the blood of faithful Protestant martyrs. Many Evangelicals have now embraced the heresy of Arminianism and rejected the regulative principle of worship - the specific teachings which our Reformed forefathers died for. These were the two major features of the Reformation's rejection of Romanism. It is no surprise then that these same Evangelicals are now bowing low to make a compact with the devil's daughter - Rome. Any book that reaches out, such as Far From Rome does, warning of the blasphemy and apostasy of the "mother of harlots," exposing the great Roman Catholic abomination, and encouraging separation from and testimony against this exceedingly deceptive evil, is to be welcomed! Your Servant in Christ, Reg Barrow President, Still Waters Revival Books Still Waters Revival Books PRESENTS The Quote of the Month (May, 1992) JESUS CHRIST, LORD OF POLITICS! Jesus Christ is the unrivalled monarch of the political process of the United States of America (and all other nations, and tongues, and kings-RB). Christians have the duty to declare His lordship in the American political arena; and they may not rest until His divine rights and absolute authority are recognized and submitted to in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of our civil government at the national, state, and municipal levels. For a Christian to seek anything less is to act as if Christ is something less than what He, in fact, is-King of kings and Lord of lords, Who possesses all authority and power in heaven and on earth (Matt. 28:18). Neutrality in politics is rebellion against the Lord Christ. An example of proper zeal for the crown rights of Jesus Christ was Rev. James Henry Thronwell, who, in 1861, fought for the following preamble to be included in the constitution of the Confederacy:5 "Nevertheless we, the people of these Confederate States, distinctly acknowledge our responsibility to God, and the supremacy of His Son, Jesus Christ, as King of kings and Lord of lords; and hereby ordain that no law shall be passed by the Congress of these Confederate States inconsistent with the will of God, as revealed in the Holy Scriptures."6 7. Joe Morecraft, With Liberty and Justice For All, (Sevierville, TN: Onward Press, 1991), pp. 137, 138. See the cover of our May/92 catalogue or page 29-40% off! 7. "Thornwell's Theocracy," in Presbyterian Heritage, Vol. 1, No. 1, published by Atlanta Christian Training Center, Atlanta, GA (Cited in Morecraft, With Justice & Liberty For All, pp. 137, 138). "Go to, now, you whom the spiritual worship of the gospel is despised; [you] that - unless it be adorned, as you say (or rather defiled), with the rites and ceremonies of your own invention - think there is no order, comeliness, or beauty in it! Set yourselves to find out whatever pleaseth your imaginations; borrow this of the Jews, that of the Pagans, all of the Papists that you think conducing to that end and purpose; lavish gold out of the bag for the beautifying of it; - will it compare with this glory of the worship of the gospel, that is all carried on under the conduct and administration of the glorious High Priest? (i.e. the Lord Jesus Christ - RB) ... The world is apt to despise the worship of the saints, as mean and contemptible, - unmeet for the majesty of God. This puts them on the inventing of what they suppose more glorious and beautiful, though God abhors it!" THE NATURE AND BEAUTY OF GOSPEL WORSHIP by John Owen from vol. 9 of his Works The Public school has become the established church of secular society. (Ivan Illish cited in Klicka, Chris The Right Choice, The Incredible Failure of Public Education & the Rising Hope of Home Schooling - An Academic, Historical, Practical, & Legal Perspective [Oregon: Noble Publishing Assoc., 1992], p. 75). I think that the most important factor moving us toward a secular society has been the educational factor. Our schools may not teach Johnny to read properly, but the fact that Johnny is in school until he is sixteen tends to lead toward the elimination of religious superstition. (Blanchard in The Humanist cited in Klicka, Chris The Right Choice, The Incredible Failure of Public Education & the Rising Hope of Home Schooling - An Academic, Historical, Practical, & Legal Perspective [Oregon: Noble Publishing Assoc., 1992], p. 75). 1. Greg Bahnsen in Theonomy An Informed Response (Tyler, TX: ICE, 1991), p. 92, cites J. Gresham Machen from "Christianity and Culture," Education, Christianity, and the State (Jefferson, MD: The Trinity Foundation, [1913] 1987), pp. 49-50, 51, 52. 2. Ibid., p. 57 3. "The Necessity of the Christian School" (1934), ibid., p. 77. 1. Spurgeon, Charles. Spurgeon's Sovereign Grace Sermons (Edmonton, AB: Still Waters Revival Books, reprint 1990) pp. 129-130. See SWRB catalogue page 24, this title is now 50% off. 2. Boettner, Loraine. The Reformed Faith (Presbyterian and Reformed Publ., [1983] seventh printing 1989), p. 2. See catalogue page 23, this title now 35% off. 6. "How Best to Secure a Return to the Use of the Psalms in the Ordinance of Praise" The Psalms in Worship (Edmonton, Alberta: Still Waters Revival Books, [1907] 1992), Appendix. See cover of catalogue or page 25-first copy 75% off, subsequent copies 50% off! 7. Cf. Jacqueline Kasun, The War Against Population: The Economics and Ideology of Population Control (San Francisco, CA: Ignatius, 1988).-RB (Reg Barrow) 8. For a succinct and excellent explanation of the law of God concerning sexuality (i.e. the seventh commandment) see The Westminster Larger Catechism in the Westminster Confession of Faith (Glasgow, Scotland: Free Presbyterian Publications, [1648] reprinted 1994), questions and answers 137-139, found on pages 222-225 of this edition.-RB 9. Cf. David Hall, ed., Welfare Reformed: A Compassionate Approach (Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing/Legacy Communications, 1994). 10. Cf. George Grant,The Family Under Siege: What the New Social Engineers Have in Mind for You and Your Children (Minneapolis, Minnesota: Bethany House Publishers, 1994). 11. Cf. Steve Schlissel, The Right to Death (cassette distributed by Still Waters Revival Books) and E. Calvin Beisner, Man, Economy, and the Environment in Biblical Perspective (Moscow, ID: Canon Press, 1994).-RB 12. Charles Church, A Word on Working Mothers (Mt. Carmel Publications, n.d.) or Jane Schulz, The Christian Woman's Place (n.p., n.d.). 13. Cf. Charles Provan, The Bible and Birth Control (Monongahela, PA: Zimmer Printing, 1989) or Steve Schlissel, Birth Control and the Christian (cassette). 14. Cf. Mary Pride, The Way Home: Beyond Feminism, Back to Reality (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, Thirteenth printing 1993) or Mary Pride, All the Way Home: Power for Your Fam ily To Be its Best (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, Second printing 1989).-RB 15. Cf. Charles Provan, The Bible and Birth Control (Monongahela, PA: Zimmer Printing, 1989) or the cassette sermon Birth Control and the Christian by Steve Schlissel. 16. Cf. George Grant, Legislating Immorality: The Homosexual Movement Comes Out of the Closet (Moody Press/Legacy Communications, 1993), George Grant or the video Gay Rights - Special Rights: Inside the Homosexual Agenda (Hemet, CA: Jeremiah Films, 1993).-RB 17. Cf. Steve Schlissel AIDS and the Wrath of God (cassette).-RB 18. For "a pro-life weapon of unprecedented might" obtain a copy of the video Hard Truth co-produced by American Portrait Films, The Center for Bio-Ethical Reform and Reel to Real Min istries. 19. See the video The Right to Kill (Cleveland, OH: American Portrait Films, 1989).-RB 20. Cf. The video set Hells Bells: The Dangers of Rock 'n' Roll written and produced by Eric Holmberg of Reel to Real Ministries (P.O. Box 4145, Gainesville, FL 32613) for docu men tation regarding this point.-RB 21. Proverbs 8:36-RB 22. Cf. Erik von Kuehnelt-Ledden, Leftism Revisited: From de Sade and Marx to Hitler and Pol Pot (Washington, DC: Regnery Gateway, 1990). To be tempered with Samuel Rutherfurd, A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience (London, England: Andrew Cook, 1649) and George Smeaton, The Scottish Theory of Ecclesiastical Establishments (Edinburgh, Scot land: Lyon & Gemmell, 1875).-RB 23. See the Puritan book The True Bounds of Christian Freedom (Edinburgh, Scotland: Banner of Truth, [1645] 1978) by Samuel Bolton, Dr. Greg L. Bahnsen's By This Standard: The Authority of God's Law Today (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1985), or Dr. Bahnsen's cassette set The Theonomic Thesis, for more study concerning the Lord's perfect law of life.-RB 24. This entire quotation, excepting the footnotes, is taken from: Franklin Sanders, Heiland (Hamilton, Bermuda: Machrihanish Limited, 1986), pp. 176-181. This novel is set in 2020 A.D. when America is divided into two societies: the Insiders and the Freemen. One is founded on the worship of death - the other on a new obedience to God (backcover). It takes a look at one scenario of where the ideas being promoted today, both Godly and ungodly, could lead us in a quarter of a century. Fascinating reading! This quotation (July, 1994) has been brought to you by Still Waters Revival Books. For a complimentary copy of our large discount Christian book, cassette, and video catalogue write: SWRB(Q) 4710-37A Ave, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6L 3T5.-RB 25. Kennedy, John. Cited in the bound photocopy of Hyper-Evangelism (Published as a bound photo copy by Still Waters Revival Books, reprinted 1992). Please feel free to copy and distribute this sheet, it is not copyrighted in any way! Also, write SWRB at 4710-37A Ave. Edmonton AB Canada T6L 3T5 for a com plimentary catalogue containing discounted Reformed books, tapes and videos (and some free samples newsletters too). 1. Glasgow, James. The Apocalypse Translated and Expounded (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1872), p. 507n. Available exclusively, in bound photocopy format, from SWRB for $30 postpaid. Also, write: SWRB 4710-37A Ave. Edmonton AB Canada T6L 3T5, for our complimentary catalogue carrying Reformed books, cas settes, videos, tracts, etc. at discount prices. 2 "Psalm 1A" The Book of Psalms for Singing (Pittsburgh, PA: Crown and Covenant Publications, 1973). See catalogue, page 18-10% off! 3. A "ceremonial" (or restorative) law is one which has been "put out of gear" by the redemptive mission of Jesus Christ and redefinition of the New Covenant people of God - rather than a law (such as the case laws) which is differently applied today because of cultural differences. The latter category of commands would include even New Testament com mands (such as the story of the good Samaritan) which have nothing whatsoever to do with the monumental change brought in redemptive history by the work of Christ. 4. Greg Bahnsen. No Other Standard: Theonomy and Its Critics (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1991), pp. 96-97. 5. Joe Morecraft, With Liberty and Justice For All, (Sevierville, TN: Onward Press, 1991), pp. 137, 138. See the cover of our May/92 catalogue or page 29-40% off! 6. "Thornwell's Theocracy," in Presbyterian Heritage, Vol. 1, No. 1, published by Atlanta Christian Training Center, Atlanta, GA (Cited in Morecraft, With Justice & Liberty For All, pp. 137, 138).

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